Page images
PDF
EPUB

83,000 Customs officers-Special-deposit account. 84,000 Disbursing agent, Coast and Geodetic Survey. 85,000 Chiefs of parties, Coast and Geodetic Survey. 86,000 Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce.

89,000 Special and miscellaneous.

90,000 Legislative

MISCELLANEOUS.

91,000

Secretary of the Senate.

Clerk, House of Representatives.

Sergeant at Arms, House of Representatives.
Librarian of Congress.

Superintendent, Library Building and Grounds.
Executive offices.

92,000 Permanent independent offices, commissions, etc.-
Smithsonian Institution.

Government Printing Office.

Interstate Commerce Commission.

Civil Service Commission.

Isthmian Canal Commission.

Superintendent, State, War, and Navy Department Building.
Commission of Fine Arts.

93,000 Temporary independent boards, commissions, etc.

94.000 District of Columbia.

95,000

Government in the Territories.

99,000 Special and miscellaneous.

FRANKLIN MACVEAGH,

Secretary.

Issue, care, and use of disbursing officers' checks.

[1913. Department Circular No. 8. Public moneys.]

TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, Washington, February 27, 1913. To disbursing officers of the United States and others concerned: The following instructions relative to the issue, care, and use of disbursing officers' checks are hereby promulgated:

1. All blank checks on the Treasurer of the United States for use by disbursing officers shall be issued by the Secretary of the Treasury, Division of Printing and Stationery, to whom all correspondence relating thereto should be addressed, and only blank checks thus issued shall be used by disbursing officers in drawing checks on the Treasurer of the United States.

2. The Chief of the Division of Printing and Stationery, as well as others who may issue blank checks to disbursing officers, shall keep a complete record of the class, numerical symbol, and serial numbers of all checks issued, and of the transfer to another disbursing officer or return to the issuing office of unused checks.

3. A disbursing officer receiving a supply of checks shall receipt for the same to the issuing officer (to the Director of the Bureau of Engraving and Printing, in case of a new issue on requisition), and when he ceases to act as a disbursing officer or agent he shall return the unused checks to the Chief of the Division of Printing and Stationery, retaining with his official records the stubs or register of checks issued by him. In case one disbursing officer is succeeded by

another, the officer relieved may transfer his unused checks to his successor, retaining for file with his official records the stubs or register of checks issued. The successor may temporarily use the checks of the former disbursing officer by striking out his predecessor's numerical symbol and inserting his own until such time as he can secure a supply of checks with his own numerical symbol printed thereon, after which the unused checks of his predecessor shall be returned to the Chief of the Division of Printing and Stationery through the official who issued them.

4. Should a disbursing officer or agent make an erasure or alteration on any of his checks he shall certify across the face of the check to the correctness of such erasure or alteration.

5. Spoiled or canceled checks shall be sent quarterly, by each disbursing officer, direct to the Auditor for the Treasury Department. by whom his accounts are settled, for preservation and future refer

ence.

6. For the interest of all concerned, the greatest care should be exercised in the custody of blank checks. Keep under lock and key when not in use.

7. No disbursing officer shall issue a check on the Treasurer of the United States until after he has ascertained his individual numerical symbol from the Treasurer of the United States, which numerical symbol shall be printed, stamped, or written in the lower right-hand corner of each check.

8. Checks rendered obsolete by the new forms issued under the provisions of department Circular No. 5, dated January 9, 1913, shall be returned to the official from whom received for record, after which that official shall send to the Secretary of the Treasury, Division of Printing and Stationery, all such checks originally issued from that division.

9. Requisitions for blank checks shall be made on the Secretary of the Treasury. Division of Printing and Stationery, on the form prescribed by the department, allowing six weeks time for the printing and delivery of the checks, and for a quantity sufficient to last six months, unless for good reason (which should be stated on the requisition) the quantity should be more or less than six months' supply.

10. Department Circular No. 30, dated June 25, 1909, which requires that on checks of United States disbursing officers the amounts and names of payees shall be filled in either with pen and ink or with the needle-point typewriter, which perforates the paper, and prohibits the use of the ordinary typewriter for the purpose, is hereby amended so as to permit the use of the ordinary typewriter with plain type or rubber stamps for filling in names and amounts on warrants and checks, provided such warrants and checks are written on the protective surface-tinted blanks furnished by the Treasury Department. Only typewriter record ribbons, writing black or blue, the ink of which must be heavy and of the most permanent nature, or stamp pads inked with a permanent heavy black ink, shall be used for the purpose, so as to secure clear, well-inked impressions, which can not be easily erased without removing the protective surface tinting at the same time.

FRANKLIN MACVEAGH,

Secretary.

Hawaiian Islands excepted from provisions of Treasury Department Circular No. 5, dated January 9, 1913.

[Circular letter.]

TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, Washington, February 28, 1913.

To disbursing officers of the United States, assistant treasurers, designated depositary banks, and others concerned:

You are advised that on January 30, 1913, the Secretary of the Treasury excepted the Hawaiian Islands from the operations of Treasury Department Circular No. 5, dated January 9, 1913, by cablegram addressed to the cashier, First National Bank of Hawaii, Honolulu, Hawaii, as follows:

Circular 9 amended until further notice. Hawaii and your bank treated like Philippines under paragraph 10. Inform disbursing officers.

Accordingly deposits to the official credit of disbursing officers stationed in the Hawaiian Islands who have no other depositary account shall be made with the First National Bank of Hawaii as heretofore, and such officers shall draw their checks on that bank as heretofore. The First National Bank of Hawaii shall pay warrants and checks drawn on the Treasurer of the United States as provided in paragraph 3 of circular No. 5.

R. O. BAILEY, Assistant Secretary.

Transfer of funds from official credit of a disbursing officer to credit of Treasurer of the United States.

[Circular letter.]

TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, Washington, February 28, 1913.

To disbursing officers of the United States and others concerned: Whenever a disbursing officer having funds on deposit to his official credit with the Treasurer of the United States desires to pay such funds into the Treasury, either as revenue or as a repayment to an appropriation, he shall draw a check on the Treasurer of the United States to the order of the treasurer, an assistant treasurer, or an active designated depositary bank as may be most convenient, showing that the amount is "for deposit to the credit of the Treasurer of the United States on account of (state specifically on what account deposit is made)." The check shall be sent to the treasurer, assistant treasurer, or active designated depositary bank in whose favor drawn. The treasurer, assistant treasurer, or bank shall issue the usual certificates of deposit, indorse the check "Credited as directed," charge the check in the daily schedule of warrants and checks paid, and credit the certificate of deposit in the regular transcript of the general account of the Treasurer of the United States.

R. O. BAILEY, Assistant Secretary.

Mr. W. S. CADE,

United States Marshal, Guthrie, Okla.

JANUARY 25, 1913.

SIR: Replying to your communication of the 21st instant addressed to the Secretary relative to department circular No. 5, dated January 9, 1913, you are advised that at the close of business on the 31st instant the balance standing to your official credit with your present depositary will be transferred to your official credit with the Treasurer of the United States without any action on your part. Beginning on February 1 you should draw your checks on the Treasurer of the United States instead of on your present depositary, in accordance with paragraph 5 of circular No. 5. It does not appear that this change in method will in any manner interfere with the transaction of your business, and there therefore appears to be no necessity for postponing the date when the change in method is to go into effect. Respectfully,

R. O. BAILEY, Assistant Secretary.

DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE,

OFFICE OF UNITED STATES MARSHAL,
Guthrie, Okla., January 21, 1913.

The SECRETARY OF THE TReasury,

Washington, D. C.

SIR: Referring to circular letter No. 5, dated January 9, 1913, from your office, I respectfully request that, if not inconsistent with other arrangements, the transfer of funds and the change of method of payment ordered to take place the last day of this month may be changed to a later date on account of the court now being in session at Guthrie, and the grand jury will meet again on the 29th of this month and will probably be discharged on the 1st day of February. There will be, a large number of witnesses in attendance on the last day of this month and the 1st of February; many of them Indians, and the others from outside districts, who will need the money as soon as discharged, and it would cause considerable trouble and delay should the transfer be made on the last day of this month. The criminal cases will not last more than about two weeks in February, and there would then be ample time to settle the matter in proper shape.

In this connection I also beg to call your attention to the fact that the marshal's office has recently been moved from Guthrie to Oklahoma City, and that some of the records are now at Oklahoma City and some at Guthrie, and that court being in session at Guthrie, it will be almost impossible to have the vouchers checked up and the proper amounts ascertained in time to commence payment on the 1st day of February, as directed in your circular.

Very respectfully,

W. S. CADE, United States Marshal, By C. MADSEN, Chief Office Deputy.

DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE,

OFFICE OF THE UNITED STATES MARSHAL,
Norfolk, January 16, 1913.

Hon. FRANKLIN MACVEAGH,

Secretary of the Treasury, Washington, D. C.

SIR: In pursuance to circular No. 5, dated January 9, 1913, I desire to know if I construe the circular correctly, which is as follows:

At the close of business January 31, 1913, I am to draw a check of the balance in my hands of the different funds and deposit same to the credit of the United States, and thereafter draw my checks on the Treasury of United States.

In regard to other funds, such as the proceeds of the sale of vessels, etc., I deposit same in the registry of the court to the credit of the court, and to be paid out only on court orders.

The collections of marshal's costs I pay to the clerk of the United States court, taking receipt as heretofore.

Thanking you in advance for the information asked, I remain,

Very respectfully,

CLARENCE G. SMITHERS,

United States Marshal.

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR,
UNITED STATES LAND OFFICE,

Vernal, Utah, February 17, 1913.

Honorable SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY,

Washington, D. C.

DEAR SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of department Circular No. 5, dated January 9, 1913, and also circular dated January 18, 1913.

I have taken the instructions contained in these circulars to apply only to disbursing agents; that is, to funds advanced from the Government to such officers. However, I am now in receipt of another check book, and notice that the checks are made for the receiver of public moneys to sign. Will you kindly instruct me whether I am right or not? Am I to transfer my receiver's "Unearned and unofficial moneys account into the Treasury of the United States? Am I thereafter to return unearned moneys by Treasury check and also to transfer such moneys to your credit by receiver's checks on the Treasury when unearned moneys become earned? For what purpose am I supposed to use the check on the Treasurer of the United States drawn by me as receiver of public moneys (Form 377 E. O. 4. Number on check, 61036)? These checks were recently sent, and I don't understand what they are to be used for.

I should appreciate a reply before I have to send in my monthly reports. DON B. COLTON,

Very respectfully,

81241-S. Doc. 1136, 62-3- -2

Receiver.

« PreviousContinue »