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EDUCATION OF THE POOR

IN

ENGLAND AND EUROPE.

BY

JOSEPH KAY, B.A.,

OF TRINITY COLLEGE, CAMBRIDGE,
TRAVELLING BACHELOR OF THE UNIVERSITY.

“See what a work the four and twenty letters have done for themselves in
Scotland—the natural enemies of vice, and folly, and slavery—the great
sowers, but the still greater weeders of the human soil.”—CURRAN.

LONDON:
J. HATCHARD AND SON, 187, PICCADILLY.

1846.

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TO THE SENATE

OF THE

UNIVERSITY OF

OF CAMBRIDGE.

GENTLEMEN,

When the Master of Trinity did me the honour of recommending me to your notice, as a Candidate for the office I now have the privilege of holding under you, he informed me, that you would expect me to publish a Report of the results of my inquiries on the State of Primary Education in Europe.

I hesitated at first whether I should offer you this Report at the close of the period during which I shall have the honour of holding my present office, or whether I should present a separate Report at the end of each year's travels.

The progress which measures of economical legislation have recently made, has induced me to decide on the latter course, as I cannot but think it very necessary to press this subject on the attention of the Public, at a time when we are embarking in a course of legislation, which will render the adoption of some great system of education more imperative upon Government

than ever.

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I therefore humbly beg your acceptance of the accompanying Report; and, though I dare not believe that you will agree with all the opinions I have expressed in it, yet I venture to hope that its design and intention will meet with your unqualified approbation.

I beg most earnestly to recommend to your serious attention, the important extracts I have inserted from the reports published last year, by the Committee of Council on Education. They offer a very lamentable commentary on the present state of primary education in England, and more than bear out all the observations I have made upon it.

I feel it but just to my brother, Mr. Kay Shuttleworth, to say, that he is not answerable for any of the opinions I have ventured to express, as he has neither seen, nor conferred with me upon any part of this Report, previous to its publication; and I acknowledge with gratitude, that it was he, who first led me to take interest in this most important subject.

I beg also to acknowledge, with gratitude, the very valuable assistance I have received, in my educational researches on the Continent, from my friend, the Hon. W. F. Campbell, who accompanied me on my Swiss tour.

I remain, Gentlemen, with deep respect,
Your most obedient Servant,

JOSEPH KAY.

1, Hyde Park Gate South,

Kensington Gore.

March 30th, 1846.

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