Selections Illustrating Economic History Since the Seven Years' War

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Macmillan, 1895 - Economic history - 647 pages

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Page 1 - THE colony of a civilized nation which takes possession either of a waste country, or of one so thinly inhabited that the natives easily give place to the new settlers, advances more rapidly to wealth and greatness than any other human society.
Page 402 - Whereas it is necessary for the support of government, for the discharge of the debts of the United States, and the encouragement and protection of manufactures, that duties be laid on goods, wares, and merchandises imported: Be it enacted, etc.
Page 623 - Bricks and coarse tiles, and potters' wares. 6. Ardent spirits and malt liquors. 7. Writing and printing paper, sheathing and wrapping paper, pasteboards, fullers' or press papers, paper hangings. 8. Hats of fur and wool, and mixtures of both; women's stuff and silk shoes. 9. Refined sugars. 10. Oils of animals, and seeds, soap, spermaceti and tallow candles.
Page 2 - ... the land ; and the disproportion between the great extent of the land and the small number of the people, which commonly takes place in new colonies, makes it difficult for him to get this labour.
Page 613 - States in the same from the said foreign nation or from any other foreign country, the said suspension to take effect from the time of such notification being given to the President of the United States and to continue so long as the reciprocal exemption of vessels belonging to citizens of the United States and their cargoes, as aforesaid, shall be continued, and no longer...
Page 612 - Vessels built within the United States and belonging wholly to citizens thereof; and vessels which may be captured in war by citizens of the United States and lawfully condemned as prize, or which may be adjudged to be forfeited for a breach of the laws of the United States...
Page 114 - ... not to seize any neutral vessel which shall be carrying on trade, directly between the colonies of the enemy, and the neutral country to which the vessel belongs...
Page 211 - Bennet, a committee of the House of Commons was appointed to inquire into the state of the police of the metropolis.
Page 610 - Berwick-upon-Tweed, or are of the built of and belonging to any of the said lands, islands, plantations or territories as the proprietors and right owners thereof, and whereof the master and three fourths of the mariners at least are English...
Page 614 - States from any foreign port or place in North America, Central America, the West India Islands, the Bahama Islands, the Bermuda Islands, or the coast of South America bordering on the Caribbean Sea, or the Sandwich Islands, or Newfoundland...

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