Famous London Merchants: A Book for Boys

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Harper & Brother, 1869 - Diligence - 295 pages
Sir Richard Whittington.--Sir Thomas Gresham.--Sir Edward Osborne.--Sir William Herrick.--Sir Thomas Smythe.--Sir Henry Garway.--Sir Dudley North.--Thomas Guy.--William Beckford.--Henry Thornton.--Nathan Meyer Rothschild.--Samuel Gurney.--George Peabody.
 

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Page 218 - Shylock, we would have moneys : ' you say so ; You, that did void your rheum upon my beard And foot me as you spurn a stranger cur Over your threshold : moneys is your suit. What should I say to you ? Should I not say ' Hath a dog money ? is it possible A cur can lend three thousand ducats...
Page 218 - Signior Antonio, many a time and oft In the Rialto you have rated me About my moneys and my usances : Still have I borne it with a patient shrug ; For sufferance is the badge of all our tribe.
Page 218 - Shylock, we would have monies', You say so; You, that did void your rheum upon my beard, And foot me, as you spurn a stranger cur Over your threshold; monies is your suit. What should I say to you? Should I not say, Hath a dog money? is it possible, A cur can lend three thousand ducats'?
Page 268 - The time shall come, when, free as seas or wind, Unbounded Thames shall flow for all mankind ; "Whole nations enter with each swelling tide, And seas but join the regions they divide; Earth's distant ends our glory shall behold, And the new world launch forth to seek the old.
Page 152 - Our ships are laden with the harvest of every climate. Our tables are stored with spices, and oils, and wines. Our rooms are filled with pyramids of China, and adorned with the workmanship of Japan. Our morning's draught comes to us from the remotest corners of the earth. We repair our bodies by the drugs of America, and repose ourselves under Indian canopies. My friend Sir Andrew calls the vineyards of France our gardens ; the spice-islands, our hot-beds ; the Persians our silk-weavers, and the...
Page 152 - For these reasons, there are not more useful members in a commonwealth than merchants ; they knit mankind together in a mutual intercourse of good offices, distribute the gifts of nature, find work for the poor, add wealth to the rich, and magnificence to the great.
Page 153 - ... is every day filled. In this case, how would he be surprised to hear all the languages of Europe spoken in this little spot of his former dominions, and to see so many private men, who in his time would have been the vassals of some powerful baron, negotiating like princes for greater sums of money than were formerly to be met with in the royal treasury ! Trade, without enlarging the British territories, has given us a kind of additional empire. It has multiplied the number of the rich, made...
Page 139 - ... of all sorts, and tents erecting to shelter both people and what goods they could get away. Oh, the miserable and calamitous spectacle...
Page 183 - Permit me, sire, further to observe, that whoever has already dared, or shall hereafter endeavour, by false insinuations and suggestions, to alienate your Majesty's affections from your loyal subjects in general, and from the City of London in particular, and to withdraw your confidence...
Page 151 - ... perfection than a crab : that our melons, our peaches, our figs, our apricots, and cherries, are strangers among us, imported in different ages, and naturalized in our English gardens ; and that they would all degenerate...

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