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h. 3490

h. 3531
h. 8533
h. 3533
h. 3536
h. 3515
h. 3519?
b. 3466
h. 3570

h. 3573
h. 3577
h. 3580
h. 3588
h. 3589
h. 3596
h. 3603
h. 3601
h. 3611
h. 3612
h. 3615
h. 3616
h. 3618
h. 3619
h. 3622
h. 3623

h. 3621
h. 3626
h. 3627
h. 3641
h. 3642
h. 3644
h. 3644

h. 3646
h. 3648
h. 3650
h. 3652
h. 3651

3
3
1
29

12-15
12-13

5-13
(9-11!
(9-12)
[10-12)

co es

9-12 adopted.

TABLE C. (Continued).

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1

CLUSTER.

NO. OF STARS.

REMARKS.

MAGNITUDES
BETWEEN
a......bin

h. 3655

9-14 adopted.

nearly equal.
very equal.

h. 3656
h. 3657
h. 3658
h. 3659
h. 3660
h. 3661
h. 3662
h. 3663
h. 3664
h. 3665
h. 3666
h. 3667
h. 3670
h. 3671
h. 3672
h. 3677
h. 3683

(9-12]
[9-15)

8-12
13
20
11-15
11-12
15
10-12
14-16

9-11
16
16-18
15-16
16-17
16-17
12-14
14
equal ?
(12-16)
(14-17]
6.5-13

17-20
all
equal
7-10
8-12
10-12
equal ?
12-13
12-15
7.5-12
equal ?

13-17 adopted.

h. 3684
h. 3689
h. 3690
h. 3698
h. 3699
h. 3702
h. 3703
h. 3705
b. 3706
h. 3707
h. 3710
h. 3720

20-30

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equal.

h. 3721
h. 3723
h. 3726
h. 3730
h. 3731
h. 3736
h. 3737
h. 3739
h. 3742
h. 3743
h. 3746
h. 3747
h. 3749
h, 3751
h. 3753
h. 3756
h. 3758
h, 3763
h. 3770
h 3778
h. 3798

9-13
equal
16-16
14-20
16
15
16
13
equal
14-16
12-15
11-15
15-16

9-13
(11 and 15)

15-17

9-15
14-15
14-16
11-16
(13-16)
(11-131
12-16

stars of these mags, only.

stars of two sizes only. 12–15 adopted.

h. 3978

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By THOMAS IIill, of

PROBLEMS IN Watson's CO-ORDINATES.
Portland, Me.

[ABSTRACT.]

The equation p= A (a-sin m »)", in which, as in Vol. XXII, pp. 27-30, and Vol. XXIV, pp. 41-47, p is the length of a perpendicular from the origin on the tangent, and is the angle it makes with the axis, was discussed for the case in which n=-1. The curves represented by it are peculiar; and touch the conic sections in the parabola and circle, but not in any other forms; a new illustration of the fact that the capability of assuming certain forms in common is not proof of community of origin.

ON TWO NEW INSTRUMENTS FOR THE DETERMINATION OF TIME AND

LATITUDE. By S. C. CHANDLER, jr., of Boston, Mass. I desire to call the attention of practical astronomers to two new instruments for the determination of time, one of them also for latitude, the principles of construction of which I believe to be novel. They seem to possess advantages which entitle them to consideration.

The first of the instruments I propose to call the Almacantar, from an Arabic term, now obsolete, but appropriate for this purpose. From the results attained with an experimental instrument, I feel justified in claiming that in accuracy, efficiency, and convenience, this construction, for instruments of moderate size, is superior to the transit instrument, while it is very much cheaper. The principle involved is the same as that of Kater's floating collimator for determining the zenith point of a graduated circle. Beyond this, however, there is no further resemblance.

Briefly described, the instrument consists of a heavy base, with approximate levelling screws at the corners. From the centre arises an upright cylindrical pillar surmounted by a cap of hard brass, and surrounded at the middle and the base of the pillar by brass collars. These serve as bearings for a hollow brass sleeve, closely fitting and turning smoothly on the pillar. This sleeve is provided with a cross-head and lateral diagonal braces which support a shallow trough, in the form of a long, hollow rectangle. In this trough is contained the mercury, to the depth of about an

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eighth of an inch, upon which swims a float of wood or iron, also a hollow rectangle, a little smaller than the trough. By means of two pins projecting from the sides of the trough and playing in vertical slots in the sides of the float, the latter is kept in place, while it is free to seek its equilibrium. From the middle of the inside edges of the float project two bent arms of brass, the lower ends of which support the horizontal axis of the telescope. The axis is provided at one end with a clamp, and at the other with an illuminating contrivance ; and the telescope has a reticule of five horizontal spider-lines. (Fig. 1.)

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