American Edition of the British Encyclopedia: Or, Dictionary of Arts and Sciences ; Comprising an Accurate and Popular View of the Present Improved State of Human Knowledge, Volume 1

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Mitchell, Ames and White, 1819 - Arts
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Page 4 - The Sanskrit language, whatever be its antiquity, is of a wonderful structure; more perfect than the Greek, more copious than the Latin, and more exquisitely refined than either, yet bearing to both of them a stronger affinity, both in the roots of verbs and in the forms of grammar, than could possibly have been produced by accident; so strong indeed, that no philologer could examine them all...
Page 2 - ... being paid in proportion to the little work which he could execute, and paying in his turn for the materials which he might sometimes spoil through awkwardness and inexperience.
Page 2 - Long apprenticeships are altogether unnecessary. The arts, which are much superior to common trades, such as those of .making clocks and watches, contain no such mystery as to require a long course of instruction.
Page 8 - Now .} of f- is a compound fraction, whose value is found by multiplying the numerators together for a new numerator, and the denominators for a new denominator.
Page 4 - ... paper, was, by the ministry of the angel Gabriel, sent down to the lowest heaven, in the month of Ramadan, on the night of power: from...
Page 4 - The style of the Koran is generally beautiful and fluent, especially where it imitates the prophetic manner, and scripture phrases. It is concise, and often obscure, adorned with bold figures after the eastern taste, enlivened with florid and sententious expressions, and in many places, especially where the majesty and attributes of God are described, sublime and magnificent...
Page 1 - When those particular incorporations which are now peculiarly called universities were first established, the term of years which it was necessary to study, in order to obtain the degree of master of arts, appears evidently to have been copied from the term of apprenticeship in common trades, of which the incorporations were much more ancient.
Page 1 - Seven years seem anciently to have been, all over Europe, the usual term established for the duration of apprenticeships in the greater part of incorporated trades. All such incorporations were anciently called universities, which indeed is the proper Latin name for any incorporation whatever. The university of smiths, the university of tailors, etc., are expressions which we commonly meet with in the old charters of ancient towns.
Page 8 - ... by broad bases. The breadth of the bases upon which the parts severally rest, and the closeness of the junction, give to the chain its firmness and stability; the number of parts, and consequent frequency of joints, its flexibility.
Page 13 - The shape is that of a parallelogram standing from north to south ; on the south side there is a broad apron or step, about...

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