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ability to open new markets for themselves when the American market was closed against theni, and the clear path for them is to follow up, with redoubled energy and perseverance, the policy on which they have entered. Let the Americans load their industries with customs duties as they choose; be it the firm policy of Canada to remove every barrier in the way of commercial extension, to repeal all duties on raw materials, on articles used in manufacturing, and on the common necessities of daily life, and to replace the revenue lost, if needed, by a wiser and cheaper system of taxation ; let them seek to develop their great national industries, and especially the agricultural, shipping, fishing, mineral, and lumber industries ; let them open up new markets adapted to their traffic; and let the Canadian flag be found floating on every sca.

INDEX.

Act, Imperial, authorizes Canadian provinces to deal with clergy reserves,

52.
Adherence to principles distinctly stated vital to responsible government,

49.
Albion newspaper, 10.
Assassination of Mr. Brown, 141.

Bagot, Sir Charles; short term and illness, 3.
Baldwin, Robert, had confidence of reformers, 26; his timidity, 27, 147;

retires from Government, 38; criticised by Mr. Brown, 70; his personal

integrity, 70; withdraws candidature for Legislative Council, 71.
Baldwin-Lafontaine ministry formed, 16; its personal integrity, 26; its

blunders, 27; its failure to reforın abuses, 29.
“Baldwin reformers,” their defection, 22; their characters, 22; assailed

by Mr. Brown, 149.
Banner newspaper, 11.
Barren speech from the throne in 1851, 44.
Belleau, Sir Narcisse, becomes premier of coalition government, 101; too

weak for position, 103.
Bennett, assassinates Mr. Brown, 141.
Bishop of Toronto, his agitation of the clergy reserve question, 7.
Bow Park farm, 118, 119.
Bribery at elections of 1872; Mr. Mackenzie's statement, 129; Mr. Brown's

statement, 130.
British system of government in America compared with that of United

States, 49.
“British North American League,” 20.
Brown, Mr. Peter, emigrates to New York, 10; his character, 9, 10; pub-

lishes British Chronicle, 10; comes to Toronto, 11; his reputation vin-
dicated by his son, 75; dies, 81; described, 81; reminiscences of, 81;

death-bed scene, 81.
Brown, Jr. (afterwards Hon.) George, his parentage and education, 9;

connection with British Chronicle, 10; first visit to Canada, 10; re-
moves to Toronto and publishes Banner, ll; establishes Weekly Globe,
12; declines nomination, 13; as a speaker and writer, 14; as secretary
of Commission on Provincial Penitentiary, 16; prosecuted for libel, 16;
defends himself, 17; detends Lord Elgin, 19; champions constitutional
government, 20; reluctant to break with government, 23; letters to
Mr. Hincks in 1851, 23, 28; nominated for Haldimand, 24; address to
electors, 24; causes of his defeat, 25; denounces the government, 25;
real position in favour of religious equality, 34; advocates a non-denom-
inational school system, 35; nominated for Kent and Lambton, 36;
reluctant to enter parliament, 36; letters to secretary of Lambton
Reform A-sociation, 37; opposed by Mr. Rankin, 38; declines to
pledge support to the government, 33; elected, 39; declarations on
state-churchism, 39; defence of his motives, 41; was he responsible
for breaking up reform party in 1851, 41; his appearance in parlia-
ment, 43; declines to oppose Mr. Cameron in Huron, 44; his maiden

Brown, Hon. George-continued.

speech, 44; attitude towards the government, 44; increasing influence,
51; elected for Lambton in 1854, 52; supports conservative candidates
in 1834, 52; influence through the Globe, 53; advocacy of great prin-
ciples, 54; excessive labours, 5+; attacked by government in 1856, 55;
accused by Mr. J. A. Macdonald, 55; moves for committee to investi-
gate charges, 55; partisan character of committee and its report, 56;
attack a failure, 57; elected for Toronto and Oxford in 1857, 59; sits
for Toronto, 59; sent for to form ministry, 59; forms cabinet, 60;
allvises dissolution, 62; resigns, 64; out of parliament, 69; re-elected
in Toronto, 69; continues agitation for representation by population,
70; character attacked in parliament hy Mr. Powell, 74; splendid
vindication of his father and himself, 74; illness in 1861, 76; defeat
in Toronto East, 78; refuses all offers of constituencies, 78; resigns
leadership, 78; pleased with testimonial, 79; visits Europe, 79; married,
79; re-enters parliament, So; devotion to his father, 81; proposes con-
stitutional changes, 86, 87; consults Mr. J. A. Macdonald and Mr.
Galt, 88, 89; consents to enter coalition cabinet, 94; made President
of Council, 95; visits Maritime Provinces, 95; visits England, 96;
leaves coalition government, 103; calls convention of 1867, 112; con-
tests South Oxford, 117; visits Europe, 118; meets old college friends,
118; his enthusiasm in farming and stock-raising, 119; in consim-
mating confederation, 120; prosecuted for contempt of court, 133;
defends himself, 133; made senator, 135; goes to Washington, 136 ;
declines governorship of Ontario, 139; declines K. C. M. G., 140;
assassinated, 141; Christian resignation, 143; death, 144; funeral

obsequies, 145.
Bull, Papal, 1850, 33.
Burns, Dr., 81.

Cameron, Mr. Malcolm, enters ministry, 16; confided in by liberals, 29;

dubbed a clear grit, 38; overtures to Mr. Brown, 38; attacks Mr.
Brown, 40; accepts Presidency of Council, 44; attacked by Mr.

Brown, 38, 48.
Cameron, Mr. J. H., member of committee on constitutional changes, 85.
Canadians as commissioners for Canadian negotiations, 136.
Cardinal Wiseman's pronunciamento, 33.
Cardwell, Mr., approves confederation, 97; applies pressure to Maritime

Provinces, 97.
Carnarvon, Lord, appoints Canadian as commissioner, 137.
Cartier-Macdonald government defeated, so.
Cartier, member of committee on constitutional changes, 85; visits Eng.

land, 96; opposed to acquisition of North-West Territory, 102.
Catholic, Roman, separate schools, 33.
Catholics offended by Globe articles, 33.
Causes of Mr. Brown's leaving coalition, 103, 105.
Causes of insurrection of 1837-9, 1.
Cayley, Mr., moves amendment, 56.
Chapais, Mr., member of committee on constitutional changes, 85.
Chronicle newspaper, 10.
Clear grit,” origin of term, 38, 149.
Clergy reserves, lands seized by Church of England, 4; some Presbyterians

accept share, 5; Imperial Act ignored, 7; Mr. Hincks on, 7; French
liberals oppose secularization, 23; Lafontaine on, 26; Lafontaine-
Baldwin m unable to agree, 30; conservative government de-

feated for failing to deal with question, 52; question settled, 53.
Coalition government breaks faith with Mr. Brown, 106.
Colborne, Sir John, endowment of rectories founded by, 31.

Commission on management of Provincial Penitentiary, 16; report and

results, 16; accusations against Mr. Brown in connection with, 55.
Committee to investigate charges against Mr. Brown, 56; to prepare testi-

monial to Mr. Brown, 79; to consider constitutional changes, 85.
Compromise, terms not explained, 48.
Confederation accomplished, 108, 121, 151.
Conference between Messrs. Macdonald, Galt, and Brown, 88, 89.
Connor, Dr., appointed judge, 80.
Conservative government, under Lord Metcalfe, 7; expires in 1848, 7.
Contradictory opinions of law officers of crown on endowment of rectories,

31.
Convention, reform, of 1867, 112; of provincial delegates on confederation,

95.
Correspondence, official, between Sir E. Head and Mr. Brown, 59, 60, 61 ;

reviewed by author, 64-69; between Mr. Brown and Mr. Macdonald,
after death of Sir E. P. Taché, 99-101; between Mr. Cartier and Mr.
Brown, in reference to Mr. Brown's resignation, 104-5; between Mr.

Brown and Dr. Ryerson, 110, ill.
Cowardice of some reform leaders, 15.
Crawford, Hon. John, Mr. Brown's views of his appointment as Lieutenant-

Governor, 139; his death, 139.
Carrie, Mr., moves resolution at reform convention, 113.

Daly, Mr. Dominick, sole minister, 6.
Death-bed scenes, 143-4.
Defection of leading reformers, 15.
Defence, Mr. Brown's, of Lord Elgin, 19, 20; of religious equality, 34.
Derby, Lord, quoted on Canadian affairs, 2.
Disraeli, Mr., on Washington treaty, 136.
Dissertation on Mr. Brown's Canadian career, 147-154,
Dissolution, in 1844, and its results, 12.
Divergence of views of Messrs. Cameron, Hopkins, and Hincks, 47.
Division better than desertion of principle, 32.
Domestic relations of Mr. Brown, 154.
Dorion, Mr., resigns, 80; re-enters ministry, 80; opposes confederation, 95.
“Double shufile” perpetrated, 69.
Downing Street management, 120, 121.
Draper, W. H., 2.
Dufferin,

Lord, Lord Kimberley's instructions to, 6; course contrasted with
Sir Edmund Head's, 69; criticised by Globe, 129.

Ecclesiastical questions, 4.
Election, general, of 1847-8, 14; of 1854, 52; of 1857, 59; of 1872, 129.
Elgin, Lord, on colonial government, 2; governs constitutionally, 3, 21 ;

violent attack on, 19; Lord Grey's despatch to, 52.
Examiner newspaper, 8.
Expenses of commissions to Washington in 1854 and 1874, 138.
Explanation demanded from Ministry, 50; of Mr. Brown's position, 51.
Extracts from Lindsey, 1; Lord Derby, 2; Lord Elgin, 2; Mr. Walrond, 3;

Lord Elgin, 3, 17; Lord Brougham, 9; Globe, 11, 12, 23, 25, 28, 31,
32, 33, 43, 68, 70; Mr. Brown, 24, 28-29, 36, 41, 44, 45-50, 74, 77;
Sir F. Hincks, 30; Mr. Brown, 108, 112, 114, 115, 116; Mr. Justice
Wilson, 131; Mr. Brown in Globe, 131, 134,

Failure of Mr. J. A. Macdonald's attack on Mr. Brown, 57.
Family Compact denounced, 147.
Federal union proposed, 71; agreed to, 90.

Felton, Mr., moves amendment to amendment, 57.
Foley, Mr., leader of opposition, 80.
Funeral of Mr. Brown, 145.

Galt, Mr., on committee on constitutional changes, 85; visits England, 96;

visits Washington, 103.
Garfield, Mr., welcomes Mr. Brown, 135.
Gavazzi, Father, lectures in Quebec, 34; outbreak against, 34.
Gladstone, Mr., 117.
Globe building erected, 79.
Globe newspaper, articles from—see “Extracts"; founded, 12; progress of,

13; leniency to ministers, 22; reasons for denouncing government, 25;
description of Hincks' ministry, 43; appears as daily, 51; opposes
coalition government, 53; character and influence, 53; do., 129; atti.

tude during American War, 135.
Government, responsible, causes of failure, 1.
Gray, Mr., his history criticised, 117.
Greig, Dr., conversation with Mr. Brown, 143.
Grey, Earl, despatch to Lord Elgin, 52.
Gordon, Mr. Arthur, Governor of New Brunswick, 97; applies pressure in

favour of confederation, 97.

Harrington, Mr. Justice, 130, 133, 134.
Head, Sir Edmund, criticised, 64; excites indignation, 68; alleged perfidy,

68; course contrasted with Lord Dufferin's, 69.
Hincks, Sir Francis, on clergy reserves, 7; on Mr. Lafontaine, 30; declara-

tion of, 41; criticised, 42; as Sir J. A. Macdonald's colleague, 51;

forms coalition, 52 ; policy contrasted with Mr. Brown's, 151.
Holton, Mr., enters ministry, 80; proposed by Mr. Brown as delegate to

Washington, 84 ; on committee on constitutional changes, 85; opposes

confederation, 95 ; advice to Mr. Brown, 140.
Honours conferred on Mr. Brown, 140.
Howland, Mr., in coalition government, 103; visits Washington, 103 ;

censured, 107.

Inspector-General's overture to opposition, 48.
Insurrection of 1837-39, 1.
Isbester, Mr., aids in acquisition of North-West Territory, 102.

Jealousy of liberal journals, 25.
Joint Stock Bow Park Farm Company formed, 119.

Kimberley, Lord, instructions to Lord Dufferin, 6.
King's College, seized, 4 ; secularization of, 14.

Lafontaine, Mr., why placed in power, 15; forms ministry, 16; house

attacked, 20; retires, 30; criticised, 30.
Letellier, Mr., enters ininistry, 80.
Letters quoted, Mr. Prince to Mr. Brown, 13; Mr. Brown to Mr. Hincks,

23, 28-9; Mr. Brown to secretary Lambton Reform Convention, 36 ;
to friend, 51 ; do., 77; do., 78; Mr. J. S. Mac tonald to Mr. Brown,
83; Mr. Brown's reply, 84; Lord Monck to Mr. Brown, 96 ; Mr.
Brown to a friend, 118; to John O'Donohue, Patrick Hughes, J. D.
Merrick, and Thomas McCrosson, representing catholics of Ontario,
122-127; to Hon. John Crawford, Lieutenant-Governor of Ontario, 139.

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