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Page.

Septem. Commodore Rodgers-Cruise in the North Sea,...

221

General Harrison's Proclamation and General Order,..........

224

October.Commodore Chauncey-chase of, and skirmish with, Sir James,

225

General M'Clure's Address to the Patriots, &C...........

228

Colonel Smith to Colonel Nicol, .........

228

Secretary of War authorizes the destruction of Newark,

229

General Harrison-Victory on the Thames, .......

...............229 233 239

Lieutenant Nicholson-Capture of the Dart,..

229

General M'Arthur respecting the Indians,..

230

General M'Clure--skirmish with the Enemy,....

...................

230

Commodore Chauncey captures 5 vessels and chases Sir James,. 231

Tecumseh's Speech to General Proctor,............................

240

Colonel W. Scott to General Wilkmson, .......

241

Colonel Clark-Capture of the Enemy at Massiquoi,...... 244

General M'Clure's Address to the Canadians,...

244

General Harrison's Proclamation.......

246

General Proctor-asking clemency to prisoners,

246

General Harrison to General Vincent, in reply to Proctor,..

252

General Vincent's Reply to General Harrison, ...

260
General Wilkinson from Grenadier Island,....

247-8
Secretary of War to General Wilkinson from Denmark,

248

Noven.. General Hampton-Battle on the Chataugay,...................

249

General Coffee---Victory over the Creeks, ....

255

Commodore Chauncey- Affairs on Lake Ontario,

256

General Wilkinson's Proclamation--orders Hampton to join,.... 257-8

General Hampton refuses to join Wilkinson,....

259

Commodore Lewis-Affair at Long Branch,.

259

Governor Chittenden's Proclamation ordering the Militia home,.

261

Answer of the Officers refusing to obey him,..

262

General Jackson-Battle of Talladega,..

264

General Boyd-Battle of Williamsburg........ ...............

266

Return of killed and wounded in ditto,.........

274

General Wilkinson on General Hampton refusing to join, and

General Order,.........

268

General Harrison at Newark, to General M'Clure,........ 269

General Wilkinson's descent of the St. Lawrence,.

270

--on General Hampton's Conduct,. .,274, 282, 286

Colonel Purdy's Report on ditto,.....

275

Treatment of Prisoners at Quebec,.

279

General White-Victory over the Creeks,

281

Decem. General Floyd-Ditto..............................................

283

General Izard to General Wilkinson,..

286

General M'Clure's Orders to Captain Leonard and Address,.. 286

Commoclore Decatur-respecting the Blue Lights,.........

297

General M'Clure-loss of Fort Niagara,..

238

General Hall-Buffalo in ruins,.......

289

General M'Clure's Address to the Public,..

290

1814.

Jan'y. Captain Shaler-Privateer Governor Tompkins,

292

General Claiborne- Battle of the “Holy Ground,"

294

General Floyd-- Victory over the Creeks, ......................

296

General Jackson to Colonel William Cocke,....................

297

Battle of Emuckfau and Talladega,........ 298

Captain Deni-ihe Alligator and British Boats,....

305

Febr'y. General Floyd to General Pinckney,...

306

General Jackson to Colonel William Cocke,...

307

Commodore Rodgers-Cruise of the President,.....................

307

March. Surgeon Evans of the Constitution-British veracity,............ 310

Pare.

March, Colonel Butler and Captain Holmes-Victory on the Thames,.. 313

Commodore Decatur-Conduct of Captain Capel, .............

317

General Pinckney-Victory over the Creeks,......

318

Gen. Jackson-Battle of the Horse-Shoe and Address to his Army 319

to Governor Blount,.

General Cocke's Conduct, from Reid's Life of Jackson,..

323

General Wilkinson-Battle of La Cole,.......

325

April. Colonel William Cocke to General Jackson, ........................

327

General Jackson to Governor Blount,.......

327

Commodore Chauncey-British attempt to burn the new Ship,.. 328

Captain Morris captures several Vesselsg...............

329

Captain Warrington and Lieutenant Nicholson-Capture of the

Epervier,......

329

May. Commodore Chauncey-ship Superior launched,........

331

Captain Warrington--commending his Officers, .......

331

Commodore Chauncey-Battle at Oswego,...

332

General Brown and Colonel Mitchell's account of ditto,..

333

Commodore M‘Donough-Battle at Otter Creek,

335.

Commodore Lewis-Gun-Boats and the Enemy,..

336

June. Com. Chauncey & Capt. Woolsey-gallant Affair at Sandy Creek 337

Commodore Barney-Affair at St. Leonard's Creek,

340

Commodore Chauncey-Capture of a Gun-Boat,..

341

General P. Stuart-Affairs on the Potomac,...

312

Commodore Barney's Battle with two Frigates,.

343

Commodore Rodgers-Affairs in the Delaware,..

343

Colonel Wadsworth-Affair at St. Leopards,

343

July.
General Brown's General Order and descent on Canada,.

346

Commodore Porter-Cruise and Capture of the Essex,....

347

Captain Gamble--Sequel of the Essex's Cruise, ......

362

General Brown--Battle of Chippewa and General Order, ...,368 & 374

Sailing Master Shead-loss of the Alligator............

373

Commodore Chauncey-Schooner burnt at Presque Isle, .......

375

Captain Blakely---Capture of the Reindeer,......

376

Commodore Rodgers--Affairs in the Delaware,

377

Captain Hull-Capture of a British Tender,........

378

General Brown-skirmishing at Fort George,.......

complains of the Fleet not co-operating,

379

Battle of Niagara or Bridgewater,.

380

Names of Officers killed and wounded in ditto,...................

502

August. Major Morgan-Battle at Conjocta Creek,..........

383

General Gaines assumes the command at Fort Erie,......... 384

Comodore Chauncey-denies agreeing to meet General Brown,

385

complains of public murmurs about his Fleet, 386

General Gaines_Death of Major Morgan,

389

Defeat of the British at Fort Erie,...

.389 & 394

General Ripley's Report of ditto,......

390

Captain Morris–Frigate Adams grounded,..

392

General Winder-Battle of Bladensburg, ...

400

Commodore's Tingey and Barney on ditto.................... 402,405

Proclamation of Colonel Nichols of the British Army,.

407

Septem. General Hungerford--Affairs on the Potomac,....

409

Commodore Macdonough-battle on Lake Champlain), ...... 410,413

Captain Blakely-Avon sunk by the Wasp, ................ 411

General Macomb-Battle of Plattsburg, .......

415.

General Smith and General Stricker--Attack on Baltimore,.. 420,427

Colonel Armistead - Defence of Fort Mc. Henry,......

439

General Jackson and Maj. Lawrence-defence of Fort Bowyer, 421,426

General Brown) on General Drummond's Conduct,................. 430

Page Septem. President Madison's Message to Congress.........

451 General Brown and General P. B. Porter--Sortie at Fort Erie, 444,433 Octob. Captain Reid- Privateer General Armstrong.......

445 Governor Wright-Brutality of the enemy at Chaptico........... 449 General Izard-Affair at Lyons Creek,..

450 Novem. General Jackson-Pensacola taken.......

451 General Jackson-Battle below New Orleans,

455 1815. Jan'ry. Great victory of New Orleans,.......

.... 455, to461 Commodore Patterson's account of ditto,......

461 Major Overton-attack on Fort St. Philip, ........

464 General Jackson to the Troops on the right bank,.

465 Rev. W. Dubourg to General Jackson and his reply,

466 March. C. K. Blanchard — Traitors in New Orleans,... General Jackson's farewell to his Army..

469 Captain Massias-affair at point Petre,....

470 General Jackson's Address and General Orders,..

474,477 January.Commodore Decatur-Capture of the President, .................

481 Feb'ry General Winchester and Maj Lawrence-Loss of Fort Bowyer, 483 March. Lieutenant Watson-Capture of the Argus, ..............

485 Lt. Thomas Ap. Catesby Joves-Gun Boats and Flotilla,........ 487 Captain Biddle-Capture of the Penguin,.........

490 May. Captain Stewart-Capture of the Cyane and Levant,..

492 June. Captain Biddle's escape from a Ship of the line,.....

494 Extract from the journal of an officer of the Hornet,

496 Lt. Nicholson--Cruelty of the enemy,........

498 Treaty of Peace with Great Britain...

504

468

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which Great Britain is engaged, and omitting unrepaired wrongs of inferior magnitude, the conduct of her government presents a and carrying off persons sailing under it; not in the exercise of a the American flag on the great highway of nations, and of seizing belligerant right founded on the law of nations against an enemy, risdiction is thus extended to neutral vessels in a situation where no laws can operate but the law of nations and the laws of the which, if British subjects were wrongfully detained and alone country to which the vessels belong; and a self-redress is assumed, concerned, is that substitution of force, for a resort to the responsible sovereign, which falls within the definition of war. Could the seizure of British subjects in such cases be regarded as within the exercise of a belligerant right, the acknowledged laws of war, which forbid an article of captured property to be adjudged without a regular investiration before a competent tribunal, would imperiously demand the fairest trial, where the these rights are subject to the will of every petty commander. PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE.

June 1, 1812. To the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States.

I COMMUNICATE to Congress certain documents, being a continuation of those heretofore laid before them, on the subject of our affairs with Great Britain.

Without going back beyond the renewal, in 1803, of the war in British cruisers have been in the continued practice of violating

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The practice, hence, is so far from affecting British subjects alone, that under the pretext of searching for these, thousands of American citizens, under the safeguard of public law, and of their national flag, have been torn from their country and from every thing dear to them; have been dragged on board ships of war of a foreign nation, and exposed, under the severities of their discipline, to be exiled to the most distant and deadly climes, to risk their lives in the battles of their oppressors, and to be the melancholy instruments of taking away those of their own brethren.

Against this crying enormity which Great Britain would be so prompt to avenge if committed against herself, the United States have in vain exhausted remonstrances and expostulations. And that no proof might be wanting of their conciliatory dispositions, and no pretext left for a continuance of the practice, the British government was formally assured of the readiness of the United States to enter into arrangements, such as could not be rejected, if the recovery of British subjects was the real and the sole object. The communication passed without effect.

British cruisers have been in the practice also of violating the rights, and the peace of our coasts. They hover over and harass our departing commerce. To the most insulting pretensions they have added the most lawless proceedings in our very harbors; and have wantonly spilt American blood within the sanctuary of our territorial jurisdiction. The principles and rules enforced by that nation, when a neutral nation, against armed vessels or belligerants hovering near her coasts, and disturbing her commerce, are well known. When called on, nevertheless, by the United States, to punish the greater offences committed by her own vessels, her government has bestowed on their commander additional marks of honour and confidence.

Under pretended blockades, without the presence of an adequate force, and sometimes without the practicability of applying one, our commerce has been plundered in every sea; the great staples of our country have been cut off from their legitimate markets; and a destructive blow aimed at our agricultural and maritime interests. In aggravation of these predatory measures, they have been considered as in force from the dates of their notification; a retrospective effect being thus added, as has been done in other important cases, to the unlawfulness of the course pursued. And to render the outrage the more signal, these mock blockades have been reiterated and enforced in the face of official communi. cations from the British government, declaring as the true definition of a legal blockade, * That particular ports must be actually invested, and previous warning given to vessels bound to them not to enter."

Not content with these occasional expedients for laying waste our neutral trade, the cabinet or Great Britain resorted, at length, to the sweeping system of blockades, under the name of orders in council, which has been moulded and managed, as might best suit

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