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to information obtained from the proprietors, consumed last year 103,100 bushels of barley, and about 71,700 pounds of hops.* The following table will show the amount consumed by each establishment:

No bu.
No. lbs.

No. bu. No. lbs.
Names.
Barley.
Hops. Names.

Barley.

Hops. St. Louis, 20,000 15,000

City,

14,000 8.000 Western,

6,000
4,000 Union,

9,000

6.000 Fulton,

14.000
6,000 Phænix,

8,000

5,600 Geo. Busch, 8,000 2,500 Washington, 7,000 5,000 Camp Spring, 8,500

6,000 Rocky Branch, 4,000 1,500 Mound,

6,000
6,000 Franklin,

1,200

600 National,

2,500

2,100
Oregon,

500

1,200 Lafayette, 2,500 1,500

2,000

800

Eagle,

28,700

67,500 43,000

45,700 • A small quantity of hops purchased was sold for other purposes.

DISTILLERIES. There are three distilleries in the city, which, according to information obtained from the proprietors, consume in the aggregate about six hundred and eighty bushels of grain per diem, or over two hundred thousand bushels per annum.

Mr. Richard W. Ulrici consumes at his establishment two thousand bushels of corn per week, and employs twenty hands, and makes two hundred barrels of whisky per week, besides feeding two hundred and fisty head of catile. He has made arrangements to feed and fatten four thousand head of hogs, which he desires to purchase during the season, to which fact he calls the attention of those who may have stock for sale.

W. C. Jackson & Co. use at the distillery about two hundred bushels of grain per day; and the Rocky Branch Distillery use about one hundred and fifty bushels. There is also an extensive distillery on the opposite side of the river.

ART. IX.-ST. LOUIS AND CINCINNATI RAILROAD. The following preamble and resolutions adopted by a convention held not long since at Indianopolis, Indiana, show the laudable interest which our eastern neighbors take in this important work:

“Whereas, public attention has of late been directed to the importance of constructing a railway between the city of St. Louis on the Mississippi river and Cincinnati on the Ohio, whereby in course of time a continuous railway commu. nication will be formed with the Eastern Atlantic cities; and whereas, the right of way for such purpose has already been granted by the States of Ohio and Indiana un ier liberal charters passed by the respective Legislatures; and whereas, the Terre Haule and Richmond Railroail Company, created under the charter of the last Legislature of Indiana, has already been organized, be it

Resolved, That this Convention does not doult the practicability and ultimate completion of this great public improvement, passing, as it does, through one of the richest agricultural regions in the world—connecting the cominerce of the East and West—bringing into ihé immediate proximity the chief commercial cities of the Union, and promising the richest returns for their investment of capital.

Resolved, That a committee of seven, (of whom the President of this Convention shall be one,) be appointed by the chair to prepare and publish an address setting forth to the country the character, importance and practicability of this work — the commercial and agricultural resources of the country through which it passes — the great advantages it will secure to the country and to capitalists, and such other matters connected with it as may be of general importance, and that the same be prepared and published at as early a period as possible after the aujournment of this convention.”

Founds.

ART. X.--PRODUCT OF THE LAKE SUPERIOR COPPER MINES. Colonel D. R, McNair, as we learn from the Lake Superior Neu's," the or. gan of the mining interest in that region, has made up his report to the 30th of September, 1847, which exhibits returns of ores and metals raised, and shipments out of the district for smelting, from the commencement of operations, as follows:

Ores and Metals raised. Am't. Shipped.
Companies.

Pounds.
Lake Superior Company,

1,114,841

31,411 Eagle Harbor Company,

321,000

81,164 Copper Falls Company,

317.050

15,263 Pittsburgh and Boston Copper Harbor Co., 7,283,340 1,497,181 Northwest Company,

190,000

7.264 Lac La Belle Company,

200.000

1,3:29 Suffolk Company,

300,000

383 Algonquin Company,

120,000

11.135 Mendenhall Company,

80,000

4,049 All others making reports,

1,327,969

40,296

Total,

10,211,200 1,693,805 Leaving the balance of 8,550,395 lbs. of mineral to be smelted in the mining district.

It is further stated in the “ Lake Superior News,” that “ the receipts, since the transfer of the charge of these lands from the War Department to the Treasury Department, exceed, by a very considerable amount, every expense attendant upon their management and the collection of rents; and it is computed that, with what will be raised by the 30th September, 1848, at the rates of this year, the rents will amount to some $25,000 over and above expenses. There are many companies who have commenced mining, with good shows of mineral and prospects of success, who are not as yet sufficiently advanced to make returns; and a great many who were doing well have turned iheir forces to building, opening of roads, clearing the land, and raising potatoes, until they could erect smelling works, four of which are going up, and will be in operation the ensuing summer-one on the Ontonagon, one at Eagle River, one at Dead River, and one at Isle Royal. It should also be mentioned that explorations dave been carried on extensively, with the anticipation of taking up these lands when they come into market, and that the discoveries surpass all previous anticipations. Gen. E. J. Roberts, assistant agent United States mineral lands, will, we understand, make his head quarters for the winter at Eagle River, the Ontonagon, or Fort Wilkins, where the business of the agency will be transacted until the re-opening of navigation.

ART. XI.-COMMERCE OF ST. LOUIS.

We are indebted to the St. Louis Price Current for the following statistical tables of the commerce of St. Louis. The editor of this valuable paper is entitled to much credit for his industry and enterprise, in collecting and collating the facts connected with the conmerce of the west.

IMPORTS INTO ST. LOUIS FOR FIVE YEARS,

Commencing January 1, 1843.

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• kegs

Bacon
Beef
Bagging
Bale Rope
Barley
Bufialo Robes ....
Beeswax
Beeswax
Corn ...........
Coffee
Flour
Fish
Fish
Hemp...
Hides....
Iron .....
lron........
Iron
Lead
Cotton Yarn
Lard
Lard
Liquors
Molasses
Nails ...
Oats ....
Oil, Lard
Oil, Linseed
Oil, Castor..
Oil. Sperm.
Poik....
Pig Metal
Rice
Sugar
Sugar:
Sugar
Salt, T. I.
Sall, G. A....
Salt, Kanawha.
Salt, L. B.......
Spirits Turpentine •
Skins, deer
Seed, flax......
Tobacco
Tobacco
Tallow..
Tar...
Wool
Whisky
Wheat
Wheat.....

casks 12,472 12,631 8,620 11,208 15,555

bbls 10,254 12,346 7,029 4,172 11,283 pieces

1,432

3,299 6.036 4,594 3,270 .... Coils

10,798 5,802 9,229 14,316 9,622 ... sacks 36,527 13,212 15,128 7,005 3,114 ..... bales

7,782 6,976 3,567 3,5981 7,787 ......bbls

759
532
531 677

73 sacks 798

827 599 928 832 ......sacks 478,449 352,381 44,341 25. 270 32,707

bags 77,767 60,450 46,802 43,476 40,297 bbls 435,019 223,670 132,196 96,203 80,479 bbls

3,481 1,572 4,006 1.970 1,386 kits 2,734 2,620 1,492 1,642 1,758 ... bales

81,525 34,739 30,985 62,732 37,553 71,577

61,980 72,918 42,802 45,814 bundles

15,695 22,651 13,238 11.647 10,314 bars 91,513 63,712 59,697 67,316 26,855 ..... tons

17,016 1,716 964 880 1,089 pigs 767 656 763,489 757,908 621,900 584,131 bxs, bgs 15,117 17,726 15.322 13,716

11,347 ...bbis 31,005 24,542

8.502 15,792 13,844 12,247 19,351 5,362

19,709

21,337 ..casks

3,192 3,122 2,638 1,752 1,505 bbls 21.554 16,774 11,876 12,068 4,139 ......kegs 22,789 33,303 14,831 23,183 26,895 .. sacks 101,203

69,620 21,969 21,916 14,212 ........bbls

478
274

292 688 1,154 .......bols

485
866
810 449

625 .bbls!

332
230
48
97

273 ....ca ks

186
169 169

190 ...... bbls 45.922 15,613 16,199 46,836 19,805

tens 2,263 2,504 1,303 1,110 2,041 tierces 762 8,666 708

618

341 hhds

81

12,661 13,898 10,237 10,738 10,470 • • bols

4,033 4,917 3,193 2,679 1,953 ....bxs 15,028 1,090

1,053 1,607 624 .... sacks

22983 15,823 20,278 49,683 34,569 ..sacks 92,809 107,581 82,520 86.001 65,574 .....bbis

44.380 62,159 21,684 14,277 37,350 .... sacks

17,632

28,478 20,387 17,454 30,300 ....bbls

740 317

419 635 .bales

1,609 1,862 1,283 1,103 bbls 4,992 4.081 2,015 4,273 3,629 hhds 10,935 8,767 12,856

10,013 20,668 bxs

9,592 6,676 7,372 4,823 6,307 .... bb's 2,217 1,754 1,705 5.331 974 bbls and legs 5,656 6,235 4,942 5,141 3,455 • bales 2,107 1,903 1,899

1,377 ..........bbls 30,247 29,832 29,445 24 147 18,605 bbls 97,123 81,350

64,887 70,777 saclis 1,222,433 743,491 382,323 267,6321 131,427

619 2,697

EXPORTS FROM ST. LOUIS, FOR FIVE YEARS,

Commenting January 1, 1843.

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Bacon, ass'd,

casks 14,085 13,641 7,628 14,953 17,676 Bacon,

bbls 4,092 4,916 7,798 6,207 1,470 Bacon, bulk,

tons
675
569 148

292 302 Beef,

bbls 12,798 20,113 5,324 5,694 11,288 Bagging,

pieces 3,363 4,781 8,192 4,218 5,007 Bale Rope,

coils 12,632 10,016 12,896 22,431 15,490 Beeswax,

bbls
624

913 1,219 1,5761 1,145 Beans,

bbls 4,490 4,408 2,170 1,448 1,327 Buffalo Robes, bales 3,879 3,630

2,716 7,404 8,141 Corn,

sacks 395,633 243,026 23 478 25,191 21,605 Flour,

bbls 448,614 359,858 202,790 130),274 123,977 Hides,

73,586 44,962 50,828 57,220 39,175 Hemp,

bales 65,752 31,332 29,604 52,654 23,704 Lead,

pigs 591,791 663,505 637,033 553,719 538,762 Lead, bar,

boxes 3,136 2,932 1,850 4,442 2,624 Lard,

bbls 39,513 26,412 13,318 25,127 22,187 Lard,

kegs 21,344 32,729 15,691! 36,410 27,790 Oats,

sacks 16,957 41,176 8,434 7,889 7,396 Oil, Linseed, bbls 1,007 522

526 Oil, Castor,

bbls 933 1,269 1,231 1,455 1,493 Oil, Lard,

bbls

619 733 3,337 3,420 Pork,

bbls 56,467 62,820 22,330 50,225 35,211 Pork, bulk, tons 661 805 203

183 Rye,

sacks 2,250 1,167 1,750 4,1851 3,120 Shot, kegs 2,506 4,122 4,216 3,0701

3,393 Skins, deer,

packs 3,700 2,162 2,687 2,726 1,034 Seed, flax,

tierces 660 1,118 1,300 2,103 2,432 Tobacco,

hhds 9,881 8,450 11,2841 9,500 19,730 Tobacco, manufactured, boxes 4,841 6,183 7,832 8,844 7,734 Tallow,

bbls

2,092 5,955 1,316 2,313 1,330 Wheat,

bbls

10,319 16,231 29,796 16,864 20,691 Wheat,

sacks 640,239 217,319 68,634 60,894 48,331 Wool,

bales 1,414 1,335 1,326 1,0841 311

TOBACCO. Comparative Receipts, Sales, and Direct Shipments, for the last five years. YEAR. Total Receipts.

Sales Here. Shipped Direct. 1843 20,668

6,847

13,822
1844
10,013
4,447

5,566
1845
12,856
6,290

6,506
1846
8,767
3,898

4,869
1847
10,935
5,089

5,846
COMPARATIVE MONTHLY PRICES OF TOBACCO,

For the last four years.
MONTHS.

1847. 1846. 1845. 1844.

January,
February......
March....
April..............
May
June ...............
July
August
September ................
October ..............................
November.....................
December....................

$3 00@3 25 84 00 14 25 $3 00@3 25 $3 00@3 60
300 a3 25 3 7501 00 3 00a3 25 3 00 a3 50
3 00 a3 25 3 7504 00 3 00 a3 25 3 00 a3 60
3 00a3 26 3 74 00 3 00 W3 26 2 60 23 00
3 00 a3 26 375 074 0 3 26 a360 2 7523 00
3 50 24 00 4 00@4 25 4 0004 26 3 7524 00
3 50.84 110 3 75 a4 00 4 25-64 50 3 75%a4 CO
3 75a4 25 3 7504 00 4 2604 60 3 754 00
3 604 00 3 750 00 4 26 04 60 3 603 76
3 7524 25 3 50 @3 73 4 25@4 50 3 50a3 75

75 25 3 26 03 60 4 25 24 60 00a 3 75@4 25 3 00@3 25 4 2604 60 3 00@3 26

COMPARATIVE MONTHLY PRICES OF FLOUR,

For the last four years.
MONTHS.

1847. 1846. 1845.

1844.

January
February
March ...
April........
May
June.
July .........
August..
September,..
October ..
November.....
December...

$3 62@3 75
4 62 4 75
4 37 @ 4 50)
4 624 75
4 97a5 00
6 25 a 6 50
4 50a4 62
4 62 4 75
3 87@4 00
4 30 a 4 37
4 50 24 62
5 (Ora 5 25

$4 3704 50
4 00" @ 4 12
3 87% @4 00
3 60 3 624
2 95 (3 00
3 05 a3 10
2 00 @2 25
2 50 la 2 55
2 871 a3 00
3 75 a3 80
3 80 a3 87
3 75 a3 80

$3 624@3 70 $375 04 00
3 60 @3 62 3 75 a 4 10
3 60 a 3 62 3 95 24 123
3 45 a3 50 3 70 a 3 75
3 65 a 3 70 3 70 a 3 75
3 65 @ 3 70 3 50 @3 55
3 70 a 3 75 3 70 @ 3 75
3 45 a 3 50 3 75 a 4 00
3 00 Q3 061 3 80 a 3 90
3 124 03 25 3 87124 00
3 70 @3 75 3 56 3 00
5 75 a 6 00 3 75 @ 4 00

COMPARATIVE MONTHLY PRICES OF WHEAT,

For the last four years.
1817.
1846.

1815.

MONTHS.

1844.

Cts.

January
February
Alarch
April
May.
June ....
July.....
August..
September
October
November
December.

Cts. 50@ 62 Cts.

80'a 85
65 a 75
80W 85
90 a 95
1100 125
89 @ 90
75 @ 85
700 80
CO(87
750 85
87 a 100

70 @ 75 Cts.
65 a 68
63 a 66
62a 65
63 à 65
50 (a 52
38 a 40
48 a 50
60 la 53
60 a 63
67 @59
58 a 60

68 a 70
60 a 65
68 lar0
66 a 67
68 670
66 a 70
70 a73
60 a 53
64 @ 56
62,065
775 a 80
65 a 90

65 a 70 65 (170 75 180 70 a 75 70072 602 625 50 56 60 a 65 65 a 68 60@625 70 73 67 a 70

COMPARATIVE MONTHLY PRICES OF CORN,

For the last four years.
1847.
1846.

1845.

MONTHS.

1844.

Cts.

Cts.

Cts.

Cts.

January
February
March...
April....
May
June ...
July..
August
September
October ...
November..
December....

33 a 35
35 36
45 050
4550
33034
432 45
33 35
33 a 35
31 a 33
35 a 37
29 a 30
28 a 31

26 a 28 24 a 26 25 26 21 a 23 20021 19. a 20 16@18 17 a 19 23 @ 25 300 33 23 a 25 28 a 30

28 (30 28030 28 a 30 29 0 31 27029 27a28 29 a 30 26 a 28 24 a 26 24 a 26 24 a 26 30 a 35

24 a 26 25 26 25 a 26 25 26 26 @28 260.23 33 a 35 28 a 31 28630 280 30 33 35 30 d 32

COMPARATIVE MONTHLY. PRICES OF HEMP,

For the last four years.
MONTHS.

1847.
1846

1845.

1844.

January.................
February
March
April....................
May.....................
June
July.
August...............
September.......
October.....
November
December...............

50 @ 60
55 @ 65
60 a 70
85 a 95
75 @ 85
65@ 72
850 95
90 a 100
90d 100
1052 115
105 @ 120
1000 110

$65a68
68 a 60
58 a 60
626 65
48 a 50
48 050
46 @ 48
486 50
44 a 46
46018
48 a 50
56 a 60

$58 @ 60
6S/a 60
58 a 60
62 a 65
68 70
68a70
70/a 75
60 a 70
65 a 68
60 a 65
65 a 68
62 a 65

$70075
70 a 75
760 $0
73 a 75
70 a 73
60 a 65
68 @ 60
65 a 70
70072
65 a 68
63 a 65
60@62

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