Page images
PDF
EPUB

Mississippi Regiment, Volunteers, Confederate States Army, as a private; was promoted to First Lieutenant in same regiment, and served through the war; was educated at Centre College, Danville, Kentucky, and at the University of Mississippi, at Oxford, graduating at the latter college in the class of 1868; was admitted to practise law at Canton, Mississippi, in 1868; in 1869 removed to Fort Smith, Arkansas, where he has since resided and practised his profession; in 1877 was elected Circuit Judge; was re-elected in 1878, and resigned in May, 1882; and was elected to the Forty-eighth and was re-elected to the Forty-ninth Congress as a Democrat, receiving 16,256 votes against 11,324 votes for Sarber, Republican.

FIFTH DISTRICT.

COUNTIES.Baxter, Benton, Boone, Carroll, Fulton, Izard, Madison, Marion, Newton, Searcy, and Washington.

Samuel W. Peel, of Bentonville, was born in Independence County, Arkansas, September 13, 1832; received a common-school education; was elected Clerk of the Circuit Court of Carroll County, Arkansas, in 1858, and again in 1860; entered the Confederate service in 1861 as a private, and was elected Major of the Third Arkansas Infantry (State troops); re-entered the Confederate service in 1862 as a private, and was elected Colonel of the Fourth Regiment, Arkansas Infantry; at the close of the war he commenced the practice of law in the State courts; was appointed Prosecuting Attorney of the fourth judicial circuit of Arkansas in 1873; upon the adoption of the new constitution in 1874, was elected to the same place; was elected to the Forty-eighth Congress and was re-elected to the Forty-ninth Congress as a Democrat, receiving 11,514 votes against 5,107 votes for Keener, Republican, 286 votes for Byrd Smith, and 29 votes scattering.

CALIFORNIA.

SENATORS.

John F. Miller, of San Francisco, was born in Indiana, in 1831, his parents being Virginians; he received an academical education at South Bend, and was fitted for college at Chicago, but did not enter; commenced the study of law in 1849, and graduated at the New York State Law School in 1852; commenced practice at South Bend, soon went to California, where he practised law for three years, when he returned to Indiana and resumed practice there; in 1860 he was a member of the State Senate, but resigned to enter the Army as Colonel of the Twenty-ninth Indiana Volunteers, and was soon placed in command of a brigade, serving under Sherman, Buell, Rosecrans, and Thomas, and receiving severe wounds in the battles of Stone River and Liberty Gap; promoted to Brigadier-General; in the battle of Nashville he commanded the left division of 8,000 men, and was brevetted a Major-General for conspicuous bravery; at the close of the war he was offered a high commission in the Regular Army, but he declined it, and returned to California, where he was Collector of the Port of San Francisco four years, declining a reappointment; he was a Republican candidate for Presidential Elector in 1872, in 1876, and in 1880; he was a member of the California State Constitutional Convention in 1879; was elected to the United States Senate as a Republican, to succeed Newton Booth, Anti-Monopolist, and took his seat March 4, 1881. His term of service will expire March 3, 1887.

Leland Stanford, of San Francisco, was born in Albany County, New York, March 9, 1824; received an academical education; entered the law office of Wheaton, Doolittle & Hadley, at Albany, in 1846, and after three years' study was admitted to practise law in the Supreme Court of the State of New York; removed to Port Washington, in the northern part of the State of Wisconsin, where he was engaged in the practice of his profession for four years; a fire in the spring of 1852 destroying his law library and other property, he went to California, where he became associated in business with his brothers, three of whom had preceded him to the Pacific Coast; he was at first in business at Michigan Bluffs, and in 1856 removed to San Francisco to engage in mercantile pursuits on a large scale; was a Delegate to the National Republican Convention at Chicago in 1860; was elected Governor of California, and served from December, 1861, to December, 1863; as President of the Central Pacific Railroad Company he superintended its construction over the mountains, building 530 miles of it in 293 days; he is interested in other railroads on the Pacific Slope, in agriculture, and in manufactures. He was elected to the United States Senate, as a Republican, in the place of J. T. Farley, Democrat, and took his seat March 4, 1885. His term of service will expire March 3, 1891.

1

REPRESENTATIVES.

FIRST DISTRICT.

COUNTIES.Colusa, Del Norte, Humboldt, Lake, Lassen, Mendocino, Modoc, Napa, Plumas, Shasta, Sierra, Siskiyou, Sonoma, Tehama, and Trinity.

Barclay Henley, of Santa Rosa (son of Thomas J. Henley, who was a Representative in Congress from Indiana, 1842-1849), was born in Clark County, Indiana, March 17, 1843; came to California in 1853; returning to Indiana, was educated at Hanover College ; studied law in San Francisco; was admitted to the bar in 1864; has been District Attorney of Sonoma County ; was a member of the State Assembly; in 1876 was nominated Presidential Elector on the Democratic ticket; in 1880 was again nominated for the same position and elected; was elected in 1882 to the Forty-eighth Congress, and was re-elected to the Forty-ninth Congress as a Democrat, receiving 16,461 votes against 16,316 votes for Carothers, Republican, and 321 votes sor Bateman, Prohibitionist.

[ocr errors]

ܪ

SECOND DISTRICT.

COUNTIES.-Amador, Butte, Calaveras, El Dorado, Mariposa, Merced, Nevada, Placer, San Joaquin, Stanislaus, Sutter, Tuolumne, and Yuba.

J. A. Louttit, of Stockton, was elected to the Forty-ninth Congress as a Republican, receiv. ing 18,327 votes against 18,208 votes for Sumner, Democrat, and 558 votes for Webster, Pro. hibitionist.

THIRD DISTRICT.

COUNTIES.Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, Sacramento, Solano, and Yolo.

Joseph McKenna, of Suisun, was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, August 10, 1843; went to California with his parents in January, 1855; was District Attorney of Solano County for two terms, commencing in March, 1866; served in the California Legislature in the sessions of 1875 and 1876; was the unsuccessful Republican candidate for Congress in 1876 from the Third District, as the State was then districted, and was again the unsuccessful candidate in 1879; and was elected to the Forty-ninth Congress as a Republican, receiving 17,435 votes against 13,197 votes for Glasscock, Democrat, and 212 votes for Burns, Prohibitionist.

FOURTH DISTRICT.

[ocr errors]

ASSEMBLY DISTRICTS OF CITY OF SAN FRANCISCO.-29th, 30th, 31st, 320, 338, 34th, 35th, 36th, 37th, 38th, and 41st.

William W. Morrow, of San Francisco, was born near Milton, Wayne County, Indiana, July 15, 1843; removed with his parents to Illinois in 1845, and settled in Adams County; went to California in 1859; received a common-school education, supplemented by private tuition in special branches; in the spring of 1862, joined a party which discovered gold placers on the headwaters of the John Day River in Oregon; engaged in mining for a season; returned East in January, 1863, intending to pursue a course of studies in some Eastern college; but the active operations of the Government in the war of the rebellion drew him to Washington, where he was appointed to a position in the office of the Secretary of the Treasury; served in the National Rifles, a military organization raised in the District of Columbia; appointed Special Agent of the Treasury Department in January, 1865, and placed in charge of a large shipment of treasure to California; employed during the next four years in confidential positions under the Secretary of the Treasury; studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1869, and has since been engaged in the practice of his profession; Assistant United States Attorney for California from 1870 to 1874; Chairman of the Republican State Central Committee of California from 1879 to 1882; Attorney for the State Board of Harbor Commissioners from 1880 to 1883; Chairman of the California Delegation to the National Republican Convention at Chicago in 1884, and was elected to the Forty-ninth Congress as a Republican, receiving 15,083 votes against 10,422 votes for R. P. IIastings, Democrat, 123 votes for H. S. Fitch, Greenbacker, and 15 votes for George Babcock, Prohibitionist.

FIFTH DISTRICT.

COUNTIES.—Assembly Districts and Counties 39th, 40th, 420, 43d, 44th, 45th, 46th, 47th, 48th, San Mateo, Santa Clara, and Santa Cruz Counties.

Charles N. Felton, of San Francisco, was born in Erie County, New York, in 1832; received an academic education; after having retired from active business was assistant

Treasurer and Treasurer of the Mint of San Francisco for six years; was elected to the Legislature of California for two terms; and was elected to the Forty-ninth Congress as a Republican, receiving 17,019 votes against 15,706 votes for F. J. Sullivan, Democrat, 232 votes for Crowhurst, Prohibitionist, and 42 votes scattering.

SIXTH DISTRICT. COUNTIES.-Alpine, Fresno, Inyo, Kern, Los Angeles, Mono, Monterey, San Benito, San Bernardino, San Luis Obispo, San Diego, Santa Barbara, Tulare, and Ventura.

Henry H. Markham, of Pasadena, was born in Wilmington, Essex County, New York, November 16, 1840; received an academic education; served in the Union Army from Wisconsin, and was discharged in June, 1865; practised law in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, until he removed to Pasadena, Los Angeles County, California, in 1879; he never ran for or held any public office until he was elected to the Forty-ninth Congress as a Republican, receiving 17,397 votes against 16,990 votes for R. F. Del Valle, Democrat, 821 votes for Gould, Prohibitionist, and 236 votes for Kinley, Greenbacker.

COLORADO.

SENATORS.

Thomas M. Bowen, of Del Norte, was born near the present site of Burlington, Iowa, October 26, 1835; received an academic education at Mount Pleasant, Iowa; was admitted to the bar at the age of eighteen, and very soon thereafter removed to Wayne County, Iowa, where, in 1856, he was elected to the House of Representatives of that State; removed to the then Territory of Kansas in 1858; served in the Union Army from June, 1861, until July, 1865, first as a Captain in the First Regiment Nebraska Volunteers, after which he raised and commanded, as Colonel, the Thirteenth Kansas Infantry until the close of the war; was BrigadierGeneral by brevet and had command of a brigade the last two years of the war, first in the Army of the frontier, but later in the Seventh Army Corps; was a member of the National Republican Conventiòn as a Delegate from the State of Kansas in 1864; at the close of the war remained in Arkansas; was a member and President of the Constitutional Convention of that State, which convened under the reconstruction acts of Congress, and was a Justice of the Supreme Court of that State for four years, when he accepted the position of Governor of Idaho Territory, tendered to him by President Grant in 1871, but resigned and returned to Arkansas, where he was defeated for the Senate of the United States by Hon. S. W. Dorsey in an open contest before the Legislature, the party caucus having failed to agree; in January, 1875, he removed to Colorado, then a Territory, resumed the practice of law, and at the organization of the State government was elected Judge of the Fourth Judicial District, and served in that capacity for four years, after which he engaged in several large mining enterprises and remained in private life until the fall of 1882, when he was elected a Representative in the State Legislature; served in that body as Chairman of the Committee of Ways and Means until he resigned, having been elected to the United States Senate as a Republican, to succeed Horace A. W. Tabor, (who had been elected to fill the unexpired term of H. M. Teller), and took his seat December 3, 1883. His term of service will expire March 3, 1889.

Henry M. Teller, of Central City, was born in Allegany County, New York, May 23, 1830; studied law, was admitted to the bar in New York, and has since practised; removed to Illinois in 1858, and from there to Colorado in 1861; never held office until he was elected to the United States Senate (on the admission of Colorado as a State), and took his seat December 4, 1876; was re-elected December 11, 1876, and served until March 4, 1881 ; was appointed Secretary of the Interior by President Arthur, April 17, 1882, and served until March 3, 1885; was elected to the United States Senate as a Republican, to succeed Nathaniel P. Hill, Republican, and took his seat March 4, 1885. His term of service will expire March 3, 1891.

REPRESENTATIVE.

STATE AT LARGE.

George G. Symes, of Denver, was born in Ashtabula County, Ohio, April 28, 1840; received a common-school education ; studied law, was admitted to the bar, and has practised continuously since the close of the war, except when on the bench; enlisted as private in Company B, Second Regiment of Wisconsin Volunteers, April 12, 1861 ; was wounded in the first battle of Bull Run; was Adjutant of the Twenty-fifth Wisconsin Infantry; was in the Sioux Indian campaign of 1862; was in the Vicksburg campaign of 1863 and the Atlanta campaign of 1864, and was wounded in the battle of Atlanta, July 22, 1864; was commissioned Colonel of the Forty-fourth Regiment of Wisconsin Volunteers in August, 1864; commanded the post at Paducah, Kentucky, during the summer of 1865, and was mustered out with his regiment at Madison, Wisconsin, about September ist, 1865; practised law at Padu. cah, Kentucky, from January 1, 1866, until appointed Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of Montana Territory in April, 1869; resigned said judgeship in December, 1870, to take effect February 1, 1871; resumed and continued the practice of law, at Helena, Montana, until February, 1874; then removed to Denver, Colorado, where he has since resided; and was elected to the Forty-ninth Congress as a Republican, receiving 35,446 votes against 28,720 votes for Charles S. Thomas, Democrat, and 2,489 votes for Way, Greenbacker.

CONNECTICUT.

SENATORS.

Orville H. Platt, of Meriden, was born at Washington, Connecticut, July 19, 1827; received an academic education; studied law at Litchfield; was admitted to the bar in 1849, and has since practised law at Meriden; was Clerk of the State Senate of Connecticut in 1855 and '56; was Secretary of State of Connecticut in 1857; was a member of the State Senate in 1861 and ’62; was a member of the State House of Representatives in 1864 and 1869, serving the last year as Speaker; was elected to the United States Senate as a Republican, to succeed William H. Barnum, Democrat (who had been elected to fill the vacancy occasioned by the death of Orris S. Ferry, Republican), took his seat March 18, 1879, and was re-elected. His term of service will expire March 3, 1891.

Joseph R. Hawley, of Hartford, was born at Stewartsville, Richmond County, North Carolina, October 31, 1826; graduated at Hamilton College, New York, in 1847; was admitted to the bar in 1850 at Hartford, Connecticut, where he has since resided; practised law six and

years; became editor of “The Hartford Evening Press,” February, 1857, which was consolidated with “The Hartford Courant,” of which he is editor, in 1867; enlisted in the Union Army as a Lieutenant, April 15, 1861; became Brigadier and Brevet Major General; was mustered out January 15, 1866; was elected Governor of Connecticut, April, 1866; was Presidential Elector in 1868; was President of the National Republican Convention of 1868; was Secretary of the Committee on Resolutions in the similar Convention of 1872; was Chairman of the Committee on Resolutions in the Convention of 1876; was President of the United States Centennial Commission from its organization, in March, 1873, to the completion of the work of the Centennial Exhibition; was elected a Representative in the Forty-second Congress in November, 1872, to fill a vacancy caused by the death of Hon. J. L. Strong;' was reelected to the Forty-third Congress, and was elected to the Forty-sixth Congress; was elected to the United States Senate as a Republican, to succeed William W. Eaton, Democrat, and took his seat March 4, 1881. His term of service will expire March 3, 1887.

a half

REPRESENTATIVES.

FIRST DISTRICT.

COUNTIES.Hartford and Tolland, including the cities of Hartford and New Britain. John R. Buck, of Hartford, was born at Glastonbury, Connecticut, December 6, 1836; was educated at the Select School in East Glastonbury, at Wilbraham (Massachusetts) Academy, and was one year at Wesleyan University; studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1862, and has since practised law at Hartford; was assistant clerk of the Connecticut House of Representatives in 1864, Clerk in 1865, and Clerk of the Senate in 1866; was President of the Common Council of the city of Hartford in 1868; was City Attorney in 1871 and in 1873; was treasurer of the county of Hartford 1863–1881; was State Senator from the First Senatorial District 1880-1881; was a member of the Forty-seventh Congress, and was elected to the Forty-ninth Congress as a Republican, receiving 16,589 votes against 16,285 votes for William W. Eaton, Democrat, 410 votes for Hammond, Prohibitionist, and 237 votes for Andrews, Greenbacker.

SECOND DISTRICT.

COUNTIES.--Middlesex and New Haven, including the city of New Haven.

Charles Le Moyne Mitchell, of New Haven, was born at New Haven, Connecticut, August 6, 1844; received an academical education; was a member of the State House of Representatives in 1877; was elected to the Forty-eighth Congress, and was re-elected to the Forty-ninth Congress as a Democrat, receiving 22,589 votes against 20,593 votes for Allen, Republican, 718 votes for Baldwin, Greenbacker, and 552 for Dowd, Prohibitionist.

THIRD DISTRICT.

COUNTIES.-New London and Windham, including the cities of New London and Norwich.

John Turner Wait, of Norwich, was born at New London, Connecticut, August 27, 1811; received a mercantile training in early life, and afterwards was two years at Trinity College, Hartford; studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1836, and commenced to practise at Norwich, where he has since remained; was State's Attorney for the County of New London in 1842–’44 and in 1846—'54; has been President of the Bar Association of that county from its organization in 1874 to the present time; was an unsuccessful candidate for Lieutenant-Governor on the Democratic ticket in 1854, '55, '56, and ’57, receiving each year the highest vote on the ticket; was the first Elector at Large, as a War Democrat, in 1864, on the Lincoln and Johnson ticket; was a member of the State Senate in 1865 and ’66, serving the last year as President pro tempore; was a member of the State House of Representatives in 1867, 1871, and 1873, 'serving as Speaker the first year and subsequently declining that position; was an unsuccessful candidate for Lieutenant-Governor on the Republican ticket in 1874, receiving the highest vote on the ticket; was elected to the Forty-fourth Congress (to fill the vacancy caused by the death of Hon. H. H. Starkweather); was elected to the Forty-fifth, Forty-sixth, Fortyseventh, and Forty-eighth Congresses, and was re-elected to the Forty-ninth Congress as a Republican, receiving 11,700 votes against 9,238 votes for Johnson, Democrat, 255 votes Vallette, Greenbacker, and 521 votes for Crocker, Prohibitionist.

FOURTH DISTRICT.

3

COUNTIES.— Fairfield and Litchfield, including the city of Bridgeport.

Edward Woodruff Seymour, of Litchfield, was born at Litchfield, August 30, 1832 ; was graduated at Yale College in 1853; studied law; was admitted to the bar in 1856, and has practised law since; was a member of the Connecticut House of Representatives in 1859, 1860, 1870, and 1871; was a member of the Connecticut Senate, 1876; was elected to the Forty-eighth Congress, and was re-elected to the Forty-ninth Congress as a Democrat, receiving 18,526 votes against 18,373 votes for Lyman W. Coe, Republican, 298 votes for Taylor, Greenbacker, and 602 votes for Strang, Prohibitionist.

DELAWARE.

SENATORS.

Eli Saulsbury, of Dover, was born in Kent County, Delaware, December 29, 1817; attended common and select schools, and an irregular course at Dickinson College; studied and practised law; was a member of the State Legislature of Delaware in 1853 and 54; and was elected to the United States Senate as a Democrat, to succeed Willard Saulsbury, Democrat; took his seat March 4, 1871; was re-elected in 1876 and in 1883. His term of service will expire March 3, 1889.

George Gray, of New Castle, was born at New Castle, Delaware, May 4, 1840; he graduated at Princeton College when nineteen years old, receiving the degree of A. B., and in 1862 the degree of A. M.; after studying law with his father, Andrew C. Gray, he spent a year in the Harvard Law School, and was admitted to practice in 1863; he was appointed AttorneyGeneral of the State of Delaware in 1879 by Governor Hall, and re-appointed AttorneyGeneral in 1884 by Governor Stockley; he was a Delegate to the National Democratic Conventions at Saint Louis in 1876, at Cincinnati in 1880, and at Chicago in 1884; was elected to the United States Senate as a Democrat to fill the vacancy caused by the appointment of Thomas F. Bayard as Secretary of State, and took his seat March 19, 1885 His term of service will expire March 3, 1887.

REPRESENTATIVE.

AT LARGE.

Charles B. Lore, of Wilmington, was born at Odessa, Delaware, March 16, 1831; received a primary education at public schools and at Middletown Academy, Delaware, and collegiate education at Dickinson College, Pennsylvania, graduating in June, 1852, with the honors of · his class; studied law with Judge John K. Findlay, of Philadelphia, and Chancellor D. M. Bates, of Wilmington, Delaware; was admitted to the bar of New Castle County, Delaware, in 1861, and has since then been practising law in Wilmington, Delaware; was Clerk of the

« PreviousContinue »