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J. O. D. LILLY & SONS,

MANUFACTURERS OF

RAILWAY VARNISHES AND JAPANS.

IN DIANAPOLIS, IND.

ESTABLISHED 1827.

EDWARD SMITH & CO.,
Coach and Car Varnishes,

AND COLORS.

158 WILLIAMS ST,

NEW YORK.
HUSSEY, HOWE & CO.--LIMITED,

MANUFACTURERS OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS OF

BOSTON, 34 Oliver St.,
NEW YORK, 3 Cliff St.,
CHICAGO, 146 Lake St.

Branch Warehouses

CAST STEEL, Specially Adapted to Railroad Use.

PITTSBURGH, Pa. BERRY BROTHERS, RAILWAY VARNISHES.

ESTABLISHED IN 1858.

ESTABLISHED IN 1858.

MANUFACTURERS OF

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COTTON SEED HULLS

Make the Best Packing for the Journal Boxes of Cars, Locomotives, Etc.

Superior in Every Respect and Costing Less than

ONE-SIXTH THE PRICE

THE PRICE OF COTTON WASTE.

This Packing has been in use for some months on several roads, and has proved a most complete success

The use of Cotton Soed Hulls for this purpose is covered by patents owned by the

RAILWAY PATENT WASTE COMPANY, of Chicago, Who are prepared to deliver the material in any part of the United States, and to grant licenses to use the same. Railroads desiring to make a test, can obtain permission by applying to this Company. Tha hulls a ill be furnished in any quantity, and directions given for using them, by

F. K. BOWES, Manager, 31 Dearborn Street,

OHIOAGO. Send for Circulars and specimens of Cotton Seed Hulls, which will be mailed free to railway men.

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And Dealers in HEAD LIGHT CHIMNEYS & GLASS, LANTERN GLOBES, Etc

Reflectors Replated, Lanterns and Gauges Repaired at Short Notice. QAQA and Works 11 Warehouse St.

ROCHESTER NY

HUSSEY, BINNS & CO. BARNUM & RICHARDSON MF'G CO. .,
PITTSBURGH,
64 South Jefferson Street,

CHICAGO.

MANUFACTURERS OF

MANUFACTURERS OF
Chilled Car Locomotive Wheels,
FROM PURE SALISBURY IRON.

Also all Descriptions of Castings
WM. H. BARNUM, President,

ALBERT ALLING, General Manager, LIME Rock, Conn.

CHICAGO, II.

Hammered, Crucible, Cast

Steel

AND THE ONLY

SHOVELS, L. G. TILLOTSON & CO.,

RAILROAD CAR
Manufacturers, Importers and Dealers in

Locomotive Trimmings,
Plain Back Crucible Cast Steel FURNISHINGS,

RAIL WAY

Head-Lights, Steam Gauges,

AND TELEGRAPH
Locomotive Scoops
Head Linings, Lanterns, Lamps,

Water-Gauges, Spring Bal-
etc. Gilt Mouldings, Heat- MACHINERY ances, Gongs, Cab Fasten.
MADE.
ers, Springs, Ventilators.

ings, Oilers and Lu. Journal Bearings. Guaranteed Superior to any in

And SUPPLIES.

bricators, EngiP L U SHES

neers' Lamps. And Car Upholstery. Nos. 5 & 7 Dey St.. NEW YORK. LANTERNS, Etc. Track Materials & Tools of Every Description. Telegraph Machinery & Supplies of Every Variety.

the Market

FOR SALE BY

L. G. TILLOTSON.

E. S. GREELEY.

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SVEREU

Special Locomotive Tubes of Eomogeneous Iron.

CLEVELAND, O.,

MANUFACTURERS OF
Solid Cast Steel
SHOVELS,
SPADES,

SCOOPS,
And Coal Shovels.
Special Attention Called

to Their
Patent Lipped
R. R. TRACK
SHOVELS

STEAM, GAS AND WATER PIPE,
4 inch to 16 inches diameter.

189 and 161 Lake Street, CHICAGO

OFFICE:

ECLIPSE LUBRICATING OIL CO.--Limited.

And Their

SOLID
THICK CENTRE

SCOOPS,
For Coal & Grain.

MANUFACTURERS OF
Lubricating Oils of all Grades and Gravities and Cold Tests.

Adapted to the Weather and Climate.

Also Manufacturers of the Celebrated Matchless Valve and Cylinder ou. Warranted not to CORRODE the IRON or EAT the PACKING, and to make more mileage than tallow or lard, and which we sell only to Railroad Companies or through our au thorized agents. The Matchless Cylinder Oil cannot be bought of dealers. Give the Oil a trial. SATISFACTION GUARANTEED.

CHARLES J. LANDQUIST,

Branch Office & Works. ERIE, Pa. Main Office & Works, FRANKLIN, Pa.

RAILROAD TANKS

Verona Tool Works.

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And all kinds of

WARRANTED CAST STEEL, SOLID:EYE,

AND THE PATENT

AND

DISTILL BY

Specialty: THE STANDARD
VERONA TAMPING and CLAY PICKS,
Brewery
Vinegar VERONA NUTLOCKS.
TUBS,

For Prices and Information Address METCALF, PAUL & CO.,
CISTERNS,
40 Dearborn St., Chicago.

PITTSBURGH.
Etc., Etc. THE STANDARD STEEL WORKS
31'Milwaukee Ay.
LOCOMOTIVE

TIRES
AND CAR WHEEL

All Work Warranted.

Near Lake and

1

PURCHASING AGENT,

Devoted to the Interests of the Purchasing Department of Railways.

CHICAGO, JANUARY, 1881.

Volume 4.

No. 1,

THE RAILWAY PURCHASING AGENT ed, and analysis shows that some of the hardest solute correctness and promptness seems hardly

anthracite coals contain less carbon than some of possible; but we endeavor to approximate it. SMITH & COWLES,

We are
Publishers,
the softer ones.

ng a list of General SuperintenAt the annual meeting of the Western Railroad dents, by request, which we will publish hereIs published on the 15th of every month, and is intended Association in Chicago, the St. Louis & San after, and we solicit information for making it for circulation among all who are interested in any way

reliable. Francisco was represented by Mr. A. G. Thompin buying for or selling to railways. It is the sole medium

There is great carelessness on some roads of publication of the proceedings and discussions of the

son, and the Louisville & Nashville by Mr. GilRailroad Purchasing Agents' Association of the United bert C. Breed.

about informing the public of official changes. All

publications which publish lists of officers of railStates and Canada, and will contain all of the official notices of that organization.

The Missouri, Kansas & Texas has been con- ways experience this trouble. Communications on subjects within the scope of this solidated with the Missouri Pacific, with Mr. A.

THE INDIA RUBBER AND GUTTAPERCHA INpaper are solicited.

A. Talmage as general manager.

Mr. R. B. Subscription price, One Dollar and fifty cents ($1.50) Lyle has been appointed supply agent of the com

DUSTRIES.-VJI.* per year, payable in advance. Advertising rates given on application.

pany and will make all purchases of supplies and The Sources of India Rubber-Chemical and PhysiADDRESS:

cal Properties-Behavior with Chemical materials. RAILWAY PURCHASING AGENT,

Reagents--Action of Various Sol. 182 and 184 Dearborn Street, CHICAGO, ILL.

vents-Effects of Heal, | Mr. L. M. Johnson having resigned the super

Cold and Light. intendency of the Cairo & St. Louis Railroad, is RAILROAD PURCHASING AGENTS' ASSOCIA

(Continued from December Number.) TION

succeeded by Mr. Charles Hamilton, who in the OF THE UNITED STATES AND

Indiarubber steam packing is of very great CANADA. future will have charge of the purchases. Mr.

value for making the stuffing boxes of engines Johnson has accepted the position of assistant to steam-tight. It is also employed for packing the Organized June 17th-19th, 1874.

the president of the Pullman Palace Car Co. shaft holes of vessels and other similar purposes. OFFICERS. President, G. C. Breed, Louisville & Nashville R., The completion of the works at Pullman, the The steam packing generally takes the form of a

Louisville, Ky.
First Vice President, W. S. Cuddy, St. Louis, Iron new suburb of Chicago, has been delayed by the cord, built up of indiarubber, frictioned canvas,
Mountain & Southern R., St Louis, Mo.
severe weather.

and lubricated, or stearined cotton. The extra

The Allen Paper Car Wheel
Second Vice President, W. R. Shelby, Grand Rapids &
Indiana R., Grand Rapids, Mich.

Works will probably be in running order by April ordinary number of patterns or devices into which
Secretary and Treasurer, Willard A. Smith, Editor RAIL-
WAY PURCHASING AGENT, Chicago.

1. The Pullman car works will not be completed these materials are occasionally worked is well Executive Committee, J. C. Febiger, Jr C., St. L. & until mid-summer. It is stated that an Eastern illustrated by the sections which are exhibited by NO. R., New Orleans; Allan Bourn, M C.R., Detroit; Wm. Irving, C., B. & Q., R., Chicago; E. H. Andress,

the Silvertown Company and Mr. Tuck. This locomotive manufacturing company has purL. E. & W.R., Lafayette, Ind.; J. H. Holway, N. Y., P. &0. R

chased 30 acres of land near Pullman, for the gentleman has made an especial study of the Cleveland, O.

manufacture of rubber packing, and you will be The Eighth Annual Meeting will be held at St. Louis, purpose of building locomotive works. beginning on the third Tuesday in May, 1881.

interested in studying his model, which illustraTHE RAILWAY PURCHASING AGENT has reason

We understand that passenger coaches on the tes the method of placing the packing into the to feel satisfied with the year 1880 and with the Chicago, St. Louis & New Orleans Kailroad have stuffing boxes, &c. Generally, packing contains

a small square core of rubber, and this is bound prospects of 1881. It has become one of the made over 35,000 miles, with cotton seed hulls as fixed institutions.

packing for the journal boxes, with satisfactory round with several layers of frictioned canvas

results. The pay car of this road weighs 25 tons In such a case the indiarubber core gives the nec Mr. J. H. Dowland has been appointed Pur- --seven tons more than any passenger coach on

essary spring or elasticity, while the frictioned chasing Agent of the Sedalia, Warsaw & South- the road- and it never went over the road with- canvas endures the hard wear, and so tightnes ern Road, with office at Sedalia, Mo.

out having a hot box until the journals were is secured in the stuffing box.

packed with cotton seed hulls. Since this pack- The use of gas bags, air pillows, beds, &c, The office of Purchasing Agent has been abol. ing has been used, the car has made over 10,000 formed of two thicknesses of cloth separated b ished on the Tuckerton Road. The general

miles and “has never had anything like a hota layer of rubber, has now become very genera superintendent assumes the duty of purchasing

box.” Engine tenders have been running since and one can only appreciate the ingenuity exei supplies, etc.

last April with this packing and some of them cised in the manufacture of such articles by eith Mr. Cummisky is a St. Louis boy who has have made over 20,000 miles; and are still run- seeing them put together or cutting one of the served the Texas & Pacific Company for the past ning without trouble.

open, so as to expose the method adopted six years, and has advanced step by step to his

building it up. Gas bags have been found vei

The St. Louis Republican says: The following useful for carrying a supply of illuminating g present responsible position.

circular has been received from the vice-presi- for the lighting of trains, but the use of the Purchasing Agents are having a very busy dent's office of the Texas & Pacific Railway Com- somewhat impoverishes the gas, as the caoute time, in common with other railway men. The pany:

ouc absorbs several of these hydrocarbons whi heavy traffic and extensions of lines have largely

MARSHALL, Tex., Nov. 20, 1880.

contribute largely towards its illuminating pr increased the duties of many.

[General Order.]

perties.

C. C. Cummisky is hereby appointed superinMr. H. P. Jacques has been appointed Pur-tendent of transportation and purchasing agent. other electrical wires, caoutchouc holds a ve

As an insulating material, for telegraph a chasing Agent of the Kansas City, Ft. Scott &

He will have charge of records of cars and enGult & Kansas City, Lawrence & Southern gines, and full power to assign engines and cars by the Silvertown Company, and by Mess

high place, and these specimens, kindly suppli Kansas Railroad Companies. His office will be to the several divisions of the road. at Kansas City.

He will also act for the general superintendent trate this use of indiarubber, and the method

Rickards & Co., of Derby, will abundantly illi in his absence.

John C. BROWN, A very large proportion of people who use coal

coating the wires.

Vice-President. persist in the belief that the harder the coal

Belting, for the transmission of power, can the more heat it will produce, which is not Friends sometimes send us notices of errors in very advantageously made of alternate layers always true, for science and experience demon- our list of Purchasing Agents, and then criticise rubber and frictioned canvas, these being b Lokata that the coal containing the largest amount us for not having discovered the error sooner. up to the required thickness. Beiting is gene

nahonra ondmolo on

Jy urad hy dry hent and in the followme

provided, this being planed out to the exact width it must always be used in conjunction with an a- drawing the tube the hole closes and the freshlyof the belting. Into this gutter-like nould, which bundant supply of water, as the friction between divided surface of the unvulcanized rubber unites may be about 20ft. long, a strip of iron fits accu- indiarubber and dry glass is very great. Consi- again. rately; so that a piece of belting introduced into derable use is made of the squeegee in several of

I did not think I told you anything about the the mould is enclosed everywhere excepting at the photo-mechanical printing processes, which so-called india-rubber sponge, or froth-like rubthe ends. One end of a length of made-up, but I had the pleasure of illustrating to you two ber, which may be used for toilet purposes, as not cured, belting being introduced into the iron years ago, as some of you will doubtless re- padding, or as rubbers for cleaning shoes or mould, the necessary heat for curing is applied member.

various other articles. It is made by incorpoby means of a massive steam press, which con

Door-mats of vulcanised rubber are now being rating with the rubber certain substances which sists of two rectangular cast-iron chests, heated extensively made use of. The mixture employes will give off vapor or gas during the process of internally by steam. Generally speaking the in their manufacture is generally of a very low curing. Among these may be mentioned damp chests are heated to a temperature as high as quality, old vulcanised caoutchouc, fibrous mate- sawdust, crystalized alum, and carbonate of 150° Centigrade, in order that the vulcanisation rials, and mineral matters, such as whiting, being ammonia. The sponge is vulcanized in molds, may proceed quickly. In about 20 or 30 minutes freely added, about 20 per cent of a low quality which it fills during the act of expanding. An a fresh portion of the belting is exposed to the of new rubber, such as African tongue being often ingenious application of the sponge rubber is heat of the mould, and so on until the whole considered sufficient. The material having been made in the manufacture of a certain kind of length has been vulcanised. The method of vul- calendered to the required thickness, a very par- playing ball. Some of the sponge rubber comcanising in question possesses the advantage of tial and imperfect curing is generally effected at position, which, by-the-by, may be compounded yielding belts with very accurately square edges, this stage, the sheets being exposed to a moder- as follows: so that the whole width is available for the trans- ate heat between metal plates, these being often 20 parts washed rubber of low quality. mission of power. The steam press is excellent corrugated. After this the patterns of the mats

10 parts red lead or other pigment. ly well adapted for the vulcanisation of figured or

50 parts old vulcanized rubber in a finely divided state, are cut out by means of punches and cutters, the 8 parts sulphur. patterned sheets of caoutchouc intended for orna- device having been stencilled on the sheet by

6 parts damp sawdust finely ground. mental purposes. Indiarubber belting should

6 parts oxodized linseed oil, means of French chalk dusted through a personaturally be protected as far as possible from the rated metal plate. The mats are then laid in

100 action of oil, as the continual motion and strain- French chalk, and cured by steam. The punch

is wrapped round a small ball of wood, and the ing very much favour the destructive action of ings are worked over again, the slight

prelimina- whole is then placed in a spherical mold somefatty matters upon it. Caoutchouc has been largely employed in the ry curing or setting being insufficient to offer any what larger

than the wooden core and its rubber notable hindrance to this course.

envelope. The heat necessary for the curing be. manufacture of surgical appliances, several examples of such uses of caoutchouc being now A very excellent method of manufacturing ing now applied the rubber swells and fills the before you. Elastic stockings, belts, and band- mats, but one not adopted to any great extent in mold. On taking one of these sponge balls into

the hand its softness would naturally cause one ages are of considerable value, as they exercise this country is to mould them in cast-iron moulds, to think it was made of a fine quality of rubber, a more continuous and equal strain than would and then to cure by the dry heat of the steam and to wonder at it being sold at the low price

the be the case with ordinary bandages. Messrs. press. Other methods, such as building up Cow & Co. have provided some samples of their mats out of strips, are also occasionally aropted. charged; but on cutting it in two the mystery is extra-elastic bandages, made out of spread sheet Nearly related to door-mats are door-stops or low quality sponge rubber being its factors. Very -a form of rubber which will be considered in buffers, articles of considerable utility in preventthe course of the evening. Other appliances, ing damage to houses by a continual banging of many hollow articles are made in molds, in the such as infants' feeding gear, injection appara - in the door frames of railway carriages, to re

same manner as the hollow balls, not only toys, the doors. Small blocks of rubber are often set such as dolls, being produced in this way but tus, pessaries, &c.—are represented in the col

also such goods as injection bottles and analo. ection before you, but they require no special ceive and deaden the first effects of the blow re

gous articles, the principle of utilizing the exexplanation. sulting from a rapid shutting of the doors.

pansive force of air for forcing the rubber up the As regards uses of caoutchouc bearing on

In the manufacture of toys, the applications of sides of the molds being of widespread applicaeveryday life very much might be said, but the caoutchouc are very numerous, and often ex

tion in the rubber industry. Tin or cast-iron time is, unfortunately, rapidly advancing. The ceedingly ingenious. Here is a small air-ball, or molds are often employed, and in some cases a making of an umbrella ring is a very ingenious balloon, to which is attached a wooden tube, pro- compression of air into the finished article is and curious operation, which I will proceed to vided with an india-rubber strip, acting as a reed. rendered unnecessary, by adopting the expeillustrate to you. A strip of the softened and This reed does not vibrate while the balloon is dient of forcing air into the article after it is mixed sheet rubber is cut off obliguely at each being distended, and by closing the tube by placed in the mold, but before curing, the soft end, as you see me now cut it (Fig. 15), and means of one finger the air may be retained in mixed rubber closing immediately on the minute after it has been rubbed over with rubber solu- the balloon; but on removing the finger, out it hole which is necessary for this purpose. tion, to render it adhesive, the obliquely cut ends goes with a rush, causing an unearthly screak,

The use of india-rubber for cleaning paper and A and B are brought in contact, so that a short calculated to delight the infant mind. Hollow erasing pencil marks is a well-known application tube is formed. This being next placed on a playing balls are made of four segments of cal

endered sheet, put together balloon fashion.
Here is one at this stage. It certainly does not

look much like a ball, but more like a withered A

B

pear, which has resided for some time in a square

tube rather too small for it. The next step is to Fig. 15.

enclose the incipient ball in a hollow spherical mandril, one end of the short tube is turned over mould, best made of slate, and to expose it to a on itself continuously, so as to conyert the tube vulcanising heat. The air inside the india-rub. into a round rimmed ring. In practice the oper- ber now expands, forcing the material into close ation is conducted much more rapidly than I contact with the mold, and when the vulcanizahave done it. The rings are laid in French chalk, tion is complete a perfect counterpart of the inand cured by a steam heat; but very often these terior of the mold is the result. As the included articles, instead of being made of mixed rubber, air contracts, the ball, to some extent, collapses, are manufactured from cut sheet.

as you see in the case of these samples; but by The squeegee is an instrument of American cutting a small circular hole in one of the balls it, origin, and consists of a stoutish strip of vulcan- as you see, can be made to regain its spherical ised rubber mounted scraper fashion in a piece shape immediately. In some cases it is considof wood. The scraper-like edge of the india- ered better to tightly distend the cured balls by rubber slides with very great ease over any wet compressed air; and this may be effected by at

FIG. 16. surface, forcing before it any dirt or foreign mat- taching a small lump of unmixed rubber to the of the material, but its usefulness in this respect ter in a manner which is surprisingly complete. interior of the ball, before it is made up, and this can be very much increased by incorporating cerNo doubt you have all seen the squeegee made lump undergoes no change in the curing process. tain gritty materials with it, such as pumice or use of for cleansing the roads and payments in When the cured ball is taken from the mold, a finely-divided silica. Messrs. Wolff and Sons rainy weather. The squeegee forms an admir- sharp-pointed or string-like tube is passed exhibit a collection of rubber especially prepared able window cleaner, and as I can illustrate to through at the point where the lump is sitated, for these uses; and they have adopted the plan

wouhonolving one to a piece of dirty glass: but and air is forced in through this tuha

On with

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