Beethoven after Napoleon: Political Romanticism in the Late Works

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University of California Press, Aug 15, 2004 - Music - 304 pages
In this provocative analysis of Beethoven's late style, Stephen Rumph demonstrates how deeply political events shaped the composer's music, from his early enthusiasm for the French Revolution to his later entrenchment during the Napoleonic era. Impressive in its breadth of research as well as for its devotion to interdisciplinary work in music history, Beethoven after Napoleon challenges accepted views by illustrating the influence of German Romantic political thought in the formation of the artist's mature style. Beethoven's political views, Rumph argues, were not quite as liberal as many have assumed. While scholars agree that the works of the Napoleonic era such as the Eroica Symphony or Fidelio embody enlightened, revolutionary ideals of progress, freedom, and humanism, Beethoven's later works have attracted less political commentary. Rumph contends that the later works show clear affinities with a native German ideology that exalted history, religion, and the organic totality of state and society. He claims that as the Napoleonic Wars plunged Europe into political and economic turmoil, Beethoven's growing antipathy to the French mirrored the experience of his Romantic contemporaries. Rumph maintains that Beethoven's turn inward is no pessimistic retreat but a positive affirmation of new conservative ideals.

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Contents

1 A KINGDOM NOT OF THIS WORLD
9
2 THE HEROIC SUBLIME
35
3 PROMETHEAN HISTORY
58
4 1809
92
PRELUDE AND FUGUE
109
DOUBLE FUGUE
133
7 ANDROGYNOUS UTOPIAS
156
8 VOX POPULI VOX DEI
195
9 A MODERNIST EPILOGUE
222
Notes
247
Works Cited
267
Index
279
Copyright

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Page 86 - Act in such a way that you always treat humanity, whether in your own person or in the person of any other, never simply as a means, but always at the same time as an end.
Page 50 - Two things fill the mind with ever new and increasing admiration and awe, the oftener and the more steadily we reflect on them: the starry heavens above and the moral law within.

About the author (2004)

Stephen Rumph is Assistant Professor of Music History at the University of Washington, Seattle.

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