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Jamaica is by far the most flourishing and important of all the islands belonging to Great Britain, it produces more sugar and rum than are imported from all the rest together. Many great estates have been acquired in Jamaica, and the inhabitants in

general

being overwhelmed by a swift rolling sea, six feet above the surface, without any wind. Being forced back to Liguania, we found all the houses even with the ground, not a place to put our heads in but negroes' huts. The earth continues to shake (June 20th) five or six times in twenty-four hours; and often trembling, great part of the mountains fell down, and fails down daily.” Another writer, in the same collection, gives a still more lively description of the earthquake: “ Between eleven and twelve (says he) we felt the tavern where I then was shake, and saw the bricks begin to rise in the floor. At the same time we heard a voice in the streets cry, an earthquake! and immediately we ran out of the house, where we saw all people, with lifted-up hands, begging, God's assistance. We continued running up the street, while on either side of us we saw the houses, some swallowed up, others thrown on heaps; the sand in the street rising like the waves of the sea, lifting up all persons that stood upon it, and im.' mediately dropping down into pits. At the same time a flood of water broke in, and rolled these poor souls over and over, some catching hold of beams and rafters of houses; others were found in the sand, that appeared when the water was drained away, with their legs and arms out. Sixteen or eighteen of us, who beheld this dismal sight, stood on a small piece of ground, which, thanks be to God, did not sink. As soon as the violent shake was over, every man was desirous to know if any part of his family was left alive. I endeavoured to go towards my house upon the ruins of the houses that were floating upon the. water, but could not. At length I got a canoe, and rowed up the great sea-side towards my house, where I saw several men and women floating upon the wreck out at sea; and, as many of them as I could I took into the boat, and still rowed on till I came where I thought my house stood, but could hear of neither my wife nor family. Next morning

general vie in luxury and expense with their fellow subjects of Great Britain. Of so much importance is this island to the commerce of the mothercountry, that a squadron of ships of war is always Btationed at Port Royal for its defence. All the forts are kept in excellent order, a regiment of regular troops is kept in actual service, and there is a strong militia of horse and foot arrayed in case of an invasion from abroad, or insurrection of the negro slaves on the island*.

forts

I went from one ship to another, till at last it pleased God I met with my wife and two of my negroes. She told me, when she felt the house shake she ran out, and called all the house to do the same. She was no sooner out, but the sand lifted up, and her negro woman grasping about her, they both dropt into the earth together, when at the very instant, the water came in, rolled them over and over, till at length they caught hold of a beam, where they hung till a boat came from a Spanish vessel and took them up."

The wharfs of Port Royal sunk down at once with many of the most eminent merchants; and water, to the depth of several fathon, filled the space where the street had stood. The earth, in its openings, swallowed up people, and threw them up in other parts of the town; nay, some of them survived this violence. About a thousand acres to the north of the town subsided, mountains were split, and plantations removed half a mile from the places where they formerly stood; and no fewer than two thousand black's and whites are said to have perished in the town. The ships in the harbour had their share in this disaster. Several of them were overset; the motion of the sea carried the Swan frigate over the tops of houses, by which means she was the instrument of saving many lives. The rest of the island suffered in proportion; and scarce a house in it was left undemolished or undamaged. In short, it entirely changed not only its improved, but natural, appear. ance; scarce a mountain or picce of ground standing where it formerly did. Upon the whole, this earthquake was a mere wreck of nature, and its lorrors were such as cannot be described.

When the first shock was over at Port Royal, the clergymen assembled the people to implore the divine forgiveness; and some miscreant sailors took that opportunity of robbing the houses of the wretched inhabitants, when a second shock happened, by which many of those villains

were

were swallowed up. The whole system of the air and soil was changed; putrid smells issued from the apertures in the earth, and occasioned pestilential disorders, which are said to have destroyed above three thousand of the white inhabitants.

* At this period there are on the Jamaica station six şhips of the line, and thirteen frigates and smaller vessels. And on the Leeward Island station there are two ships of the line, two frigates of 44 guas each, and nipe smaller

ones.

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general vie in luxury and expense with their fellow subjects of Great Britain. Of so much importance is this island to the commerce of the mothercountry, that a squadron of ships of war is always stationed at Port Royal for its defence. All the

forts

I went from one ship to another, till at last it pleased God I met with my wife and two of my negroes. She told me, when she felt the house shake she ran out, and called all the house to do the same. She was no sooner out, but the sand lifted up, and her negro woman grasping about her, they both dropt into the earth together, when at the very instant, the water came in, rolled them over and over, till at length they caught hold of a beam, where they hung till a boat came from a Spanish vessel and took them up."

The wharfs of Port Royal sunk down at once with many of the most eminent merchants; and water, to the depth of several fathon, filled the space where the street had stood. The earth, in its openings, swallowed up people, and threw them up in other parts of the town; nay, som of them survived this violence. About a thousand acres to the north of the town subsided, mountains were split, and plantations removed half a mile from the places where they formerly stood; and no fewer than two thousand blacks and whites are said to have perished in the town. The ships in the harbour had their share in this disaster. Several of them were overset; the motion of the sea carried the Swan frigate over the tops of houses, by which mea » she was the instrument of saving many lives. The resto! the island suffered in proportion; and scarce a house in it was left undemolished or undamaged. In short, it entirely changed not only its improved, but natural, appea** ance; scarce a mountain or picce of ground standing whe's it formerly did. Upon the whole, this earthquake was . mere wreck of nature, and its horrors were such as cano be described.

When the first shock was over at Port Royal, the clerg: men assembled the people to implore the divine forgii ness; and some miscreant sailors took that opportunity, robbing the houses of the wretched inhabitants, when : second shock happened, by which many of those villair

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