The International Cyclopedia: A Compendium of Human Knowledge, Rev. with Large Additions, Volume 12

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Harry Thurston Peck
 

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Page 338 - Bounty (that is, the governors of the Bounty of Queen Anne for the Augmentation of the Maintenance of the Poor Clergy).
Page 453 - The quality of mercy is not strained, It droppeth as the gentle rain from heaven Upon the place beneath. It is twice blessed: It blesseth him that gives, and him that takes...
Page 172 - Pitt on the 7th instant, for the appointment of a committee of the House of Commons, to inquire into the state of the...
Page 261 - Mining claims upon veins or lodes of quartz or other rock in place bearing gold, silver, cinnabar, lead, tin, copper, or other valuable deposits...
Page 177 - And that the private property of the subjects or citizens of a belligerent on the high seas shall be exempted from seizure by public armed vessels of the other belligerent, except it be contraband.
Page 232 - These are also proverbs of Solomon, which the men of Hezekiah king of Judah copied out.
Page 268 - Pugilists." 1. That a square of a yard be chalked in the middle of the stage ; and every fresh set-to after a fall, or being parted from the rails, each second is to bring his man to the side of the square, and place him opposite to the other, and till they are fairly set-to at the lines, it shall not be lawful for the one to strike the other.
Page 224 - Herself the supreme type of vice, she is ultimately the most efficient guardian of virtue. But for her, the unchallenged purity of countless happy homes would be polluted, and not a few who, in the pride of their untempted chastity, think of her with an indignant shudder, would have known the agony of remorse and despair.
Page 224 - That unhappy being whose very name is a shame to speak; who counterfeits with a cold heart the transports of affection, and submits herself as the passive instrument of lust; who is scorned and insulted as the vilest of her sex, and doomed, for the most part, to disease and abject wretchedness and an early death, appears in every age as the perpetual symbol of the degradation and sinfulness of man.
Page 345 - In using the quern, the grain was dropped with one hand into the central opening, while, with the other, the upper stone was revolved by means of a stick, inserted in a small opening near the edge.

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