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variety is as great as with us the quantities are correspondingly small in many cases.

We fail to see how the Government could lose or be in any way inconvenienced if the method adopted at Somerset House in England were adopted here, which is, that we merely take from our stock shelves such medicines containing alcohol as are intended for export to various countries, and when they are ready for placing upon the vessel and the bill of lading is delivered the Government controls the amount of alcohol contained in each shipment and rebates us that amount and no more.

There is comparatively little done by the manufacturers of standard pharmaceutical preparations in this country in the way of foreign business, although we are distinctly in advance of other countries in this line of manufacture, and the reason is that the inadequacy of the regulation practically makes it impossible for us to compete. The field is large and the possibilities for this foreign business is considerable, and if your committee feels disposed to enact such regulation as would accomplish the desired end the writer will be glad to appear before same with a representative committee of his line of manufacture and answer such questions or give such information as may be desired or necessary.

Very truly, yours,

SHARP & DOHME,

Manufacturing Chemists. ALFRED R. L. DOHME, Second Vice-President.

THE LINSEED ASSOCIATION, NEW YORK, ASKS THAT DRAWBACK BE ALLOWED ON EXPORTED LINSEED-OIL CAKE.

Hon. SERENO E. PAYNE,

NEW YORK, December 22, 1908.

Chairman Ways and Means Committee,

House of Representatives.

DEAR SIR: The Linseed Association of New York, composed of importers of linseed and other East India merchandise and manufacturers of linseed oil, would respectfully call the attention of your committee to the present schedule relating to exported oil cake made from imported linseed, which schedule prohibits any allowance of drawback on same.

We, as an association, respectfully submit that great injustice is done in this provision, as apparently there is no other instance in the existing tariff where a drawback is denied on the exported products of imported merchandise.

The schedule also provides that no allowance shall be made for dirt or other impurities in any seed. This seems equally unjust, as while the Government imposes a duty of 25 cents per bushel on linseed it is really exacting in addition a duty of 25 cents per bushel on the dirt or other impurities contained in said linseed.

In the revision of the tariff now under contemplation we respectfully ask your serious consideration of the points above submitted and that an equitable adjustment of drawback be recommended by your honorable committee.

Respectfully, yours,

GEO. W. FORTMEYER,

President.

HON. JAMES KENNEDY, M. C., SUBMITS BRIEF STATEMENT AND LETTERS RELATIVE TO REBATE ON TIN PLATE.

WASHINGTON, D. C., December 28, 1908.

WAYS AND MEANS COMMITTEE:

I herewith transmit to you earnest appeals by the tin-plate makers of my district, asking the maintenance of the present tariff on tin plate. They also pray for the abrogation of the drawback feature of our existing law. It would very greatly help that great branch of our working men engaged in the manufacture of tin plate if the drawback feature of the tariff upon tin plate was so modified at least as to retain 50 per cent of the duties paid and rebate only one-half of the duty when the same tin is reexported. This change in the drawback might perhaps advance the price of cans for the export trade, but such an increase would be very slight, indeed, and would scarcely be appreciable. This increase would scarcely affect the farmer whose product is sent abroad in cans, and no one should be more willing to have that change made than the farmer, for the only prices that are excessive in the markets to-day are the prices of foodstuffs. In Youngstown 4 pounds of butter is worth as much as a hundred-pound keg of nails, and 40 dozen of eggs commands as great a price as a ton of pig iron, so that it seems it would be more profitable to be the owner of a flock of industrious hens than to own a blast furnace. I earnestly urge in behalf of my constituents who make tin plate that their communications be carefully considered when this schedule in the new bill is taken up, and that the drawback feature be so modified that with the liberal concession the workmen are willing to make in their own wages a part at least of the great amount of our own export tin plate in the future shall be manufactured at home.

Very respectfully submitted.

JAMES KENNEDY,

Member of Congress, Eighteenth Ohio District.

EXHIBIT A.

YOUNGSTOWN, OHIO, December 24, 1908.

Hon. JAMES KENNEDY, M. C.,

House of Representatives, Washington, D. C.

DEAR SIR: Being in possession of information that the Ways and Means Committee are going to introduce a tariff bill in this session of Congress, and being interested in the metal schedule directly, we desire to call your attention to the unjust provision of the drawback provision of the Dingley tariff law as it affects the importation of tin plate. Representatives of our association appeared before the committee on November 27, 1908, urging not alone the abrogation of the drawback agreement, but the maintenance of the present duty on tin plate. United States Treasury statistics show that during the six years ending in 1907, the amount of $10,911,635 has been refunded. to foreign manufacturers on reexported plates, which admits this product into the United States for one one-hundredth of 13 cents.

To enable American manufacturers to compete with imported plate American workingmen have taken a reduction of 25 per cent in

their wages, when working reexport plate. However, in view of this concession, importations are increasing, which is resultant in the American mills being closed in many instances, while the mills in Wales where this product is worked, are running at their full capacity.

By referring to the hearing of the Ways and Means Committee on November 27, 1908, and to a brief submitted on December 2, 1908, by the officials of our association, you will obtain added information bearing on this subject, which we deem of vital importance not alone to employees in American tin-plate mills, but to the industry in general.

Trusting you can see your way clear to give this matter your earnest support and cooperation, we are, on behalf of East Youngstown Lodge, No. 8, State of Ohio, located at Youngstown,

Respectfully, yours,

AMALGAMATED ASSOCIATION OF IRON,
STEEL, AND TIN WORKERS,

EDWARD CAVANAUGH, President.

ROBERT WILLIAMS, Recording Secretary.

EDWARD CAVANAUGH, Corresponding Secretary.

(Mr. Kennedy also filed a similar statement from the Youngstown (Ohio) Lodge, No. 14, Amalgamated Association of Iron, Steel, and Tin Workers of the United States.)

THE S. C. HERBST IMPORTING COMPANY, MILWAUKEE, WIS., WISHES DRAWBACK TO APPLY TO DOMESTIC ALCOHOL.

COMMITTEE ON WAYS AND MEANS,

MILWAUKEE, January 2, 1909.

Washington, D. C.

GENTLEMEN: It has come to our knowledge that there is now pending before your honorable committee a measure entitled "An amendment to the tariff bill to encourage the sale and exportation of articles of domestic manufacture," and providing that a drawback shall be allowed on articles manufactured or produced in the United States in part from domestic alcohol equal to the amount of tax paid on the alcohol so used, when such articles are exported.

We desire to add our hearty indorsement to this amendment, believing its provisions to be just and calculated to encourage and stimulate the industries affected thereby, and further would respectfully suggest that said amendment also provide:

That on articles so exported which are manufactured in the United States and composed wholly or in part of cordials, brandy, gins, bitters, whiskies, etc., of foreign manufacture on which duty has been paid, a drawback equal to the amount of duty so paid shall be allowed when exportation is made.

As large exporters of our brand, the Chancellor cocktails, we find ourselves handicapped by the fact that as these cocktails are largely composed of foreign liquors, thus we are obliged to pay duty on the material coming in, and must again take into consideration that a duty must be paid on the finished product when exported by the foreign merchant.

On a number of occasions, and of late particularly in the Canadian market, we have found it impossible to lay down the goods abroad at a price satisfactory to prospective buyers, whereas with the benefit of a drawback, as above, we could unquestionably enlarge our export trade to quite an extent. The popularity of the American cocktail abroad is constantly increasing, and it will readily be seen that it would be much less difficult to interest the foreign merchant if the necessity of paying double duty was removed.

We would ask that you kindly file this letter with the amendment as introduced on December 15, 1908.

Trusting your honorable committee will report favorably to the passage of the amendment, we beg to remain,

Yours, respectfully,

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GEO. BENZ & SONS, OF ST. PAUL, MINN., ASK FOR APPLICATION OF DRAWBACK TO INTERNAL-REVENUE TAX.

ST. PAUL, MINN., January 6, 1909.

COMMITTEE ON WAYS AND MEANS,

House of Representatives, Washington, D. C.

GENTLEMEN: Our attention having been called to a proposed "amendment to the tariff bill to encourage the sale and exportation of articles of domestic manufacture," a copy of which is hereto attached, we desire to record our favor of such an amendment to our existing tariff law. We will thank you to have this, our approval, filed with the amendment introduced December 15, 1908.

Respectfully,

GEO. BENZ & SONS,

Distillers of Kentucky, Maryland, and Pennsylvania Whiskies.

AN AMENDMENT TO THE TARIFF BILL TO ENCOURAGE THE SALE AND EXPORTATION OF ARTICLES OF DOMESTIC MANUFACTURE.

SECTION 1. That on the exportation of spirits, whisky, brandy, and cordials manufactured or produced in the United States on which an internal-revenue tax has been paid there shall be allowed a drawback equal in amount to the tax paid on same.

SEC. 2. That on the exportation of articles manufactured or produced in the United "States in part from domestic alcohol on which an internal-revenue tax has been paid there shall be allowed a drawback equal in amount to the tax paid on the alcohol so used: Provided, That no other than domestic tax-paid alcohol shall have been used in the manufacture or production of such articles. Such drawback shall be determined by the appraiser of customs at port of exportation and paid in manner provided for payment of drawback on exportation of articles of domestic manufacture and production made wholly or in part from imported duty-paid materials, under section thirty of an act entitled "An act to provide revenue for the Government and to encourage the industries of the United States," approved July twenty-fourth, eighteen hundred and ninety-seven.

The above resolution was also indorsed by the following: Chapin & Carr, Nepeenauk Building, 16 Adams street, Chicago, Ill., and Grommes & Ullrich, 194 Dearborn street, Chicago, Ill.

HON. EDWIN DENBY, M. C., FILES LETTER FROM THE AMALGAMATED ASSOCIATION OF IRON, STEEL, AND TIN WORKERS RELATIVE TO TIN-PLATE DRAWBACK.

Hon. SERENO E. PAYNE,

WASHINGTON, D. C., January 7, 1909.

Chairman Committee on Ways and Means,

Washington, D. C.

DEAR SIR: I send you inclosed herewith for the consideration of the committee letter received from Michigan Lodge, No. 1, Amalgamated Association of Iron, Steel, and Tin Workers of the United States, of Detroit, Mich., urging the abrogation of the drawback provision of the Dingley tariff law as it affects the importation of tin plate.

Will you please send me, if convenient, a copy of the hearing upon this subject held November 27, 1908, and also a copy of the brief submitted on December 2, 1908, by the officials of the above-named association?

Yours, very truly,

Hon. EDWIN DENBY,

EDWIN DENBY, M. C.

DETROIT, MICH., January 4, 1909.

House of Representatives, Washington, D. C.

DEAR SIR: Being in possession of information that the Ways and Means Committee are going to introduce a tariff bill in this session of Congress, and being interested in the metal schedule directly, we desire to call your attention to the unjust provision of the drawback section of the Dingley tariff law as it affects the importations of tin plate. Representatives of our association appeared before the committee on November 27, 1908, urging not alone the abrogation of the drawback agreement, but the maintenance of the present duty on tin plate. United States Treasury statistics show that during the six years ending in 1907 the amount of $10,911,635 has been refunded to foreign manufacturers on reexported plates, which admits this product into the United States for one-hundredth of 1 cents. To enable American manufacturers to compete with imported plate, American workingmen have taken a reduction of 25 per cent in their wages when working reexport plate. However, in view of this concession, importations are increasing, which is resultant in the American mills being closed in many instances, while the mills in Wales, where this product is worked, are running at their full capacity.

By referring to the hearing of the Ways and Means Committee on November 27, 1908, and to a brief submitted on December 2, 1908, by the officials of our association, you will obtain added information bearing on this subject, which we deem of vital importance not alone to employees in American tin plate mills but to the industry in general. Trusting you can see your way clear to give this matter your earnest support and cooperation, we are, on behalf of Michigan Lodge No. 1, State of Michigan, located at Detroit,

Respectfully, yours,

LEO HOPPE, President.
JAS. B. BUCKLEY, Cor. Rep.

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