The parliamentary remembrancer, conducted by T. Smith, Volume 4

Front Cover
Joshua Toulmin Smith
1881
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 142 - That Mr. Speaker do issue his warrant to the Clerk of the Crown, to make out a new writ, for the electing of a...
Page 207 - The same combination, in short, would result from an apprehension of the federal, as was produced by the dread of a foreign yoke ; and unless the projected innovations should be voluntarily renounced, the same appeal to a trial of force would be made in the one case, as was made in the other.
Page 177 - An Act to defray the charge of the pay, clothing, and contingent and other expenses of the disembodied Militia in Great Britain and Ireland ; to grant allowances in certain cases to Subaltern Officers, Adjutants, Paymasters, Quartermasters, Surgeons, Assistant-Surgeons, and Surgeons Mates of the Militia ; and to authorize the employment of the Non-commissioned Officers.
Page 198 - I know that prerogative is part of the law ; but sovereign power is no parliamentary word. In my opinion it weakens magna charta, and all the statutes ; for they are absolute, without any saving of sovereign power...
Page 198 - Facto, an inherent Right and Interest of Liberty and Freedom, in the Subjects of this Realm, as their Birthrights and Inheritances descendable to their Heirs and Posterity ! — Statutes, incorporate into the Body of the Common Law ; over which — (with Reverence be it spoken) — there is no Trust in the King's Sovereign Power...
Page 199 - Will you solemnly promise and swear to govern the people of this kingdom of England, and the dominions thereto belonging, according to the statutes in parliament agreed on, and the laws and customs of the same?
Page 57 - For every Englishman is intended to be there present, either in person or by procuration and attorneys, of what preeminence, state, dignity or quality soever he be, from the prince, be he king or queen, to the lowest person of England. And the consent of the parliament is taken to be every man's consent.
Page 207 - When the sword is once drawn, the passions of men observe no bounds of moderation. The suggestions of wounded pride, the instigations of irritated resentment, would be apt to carry the States, against which the arms of the Union were exerted to any extremes necessary to revenge the affront, or to avoid the disgrace of submission. The first war of this kind would probably terminate in a dissolution of the Union.
Page 14 - To consolidate and amend the statute law of 'England and Ireland relating to malicious injuries to property...
Page 22 - That a Select Committee be appointed to inquire into the administration of the relief of the poor under the orders and regulations issued by the Commissioners appointed under the provisions of the Poor Law Amendment Act.

Bibliographic information