Interoceanic communications; nationality; domicil; passports

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U.S. Government Printing Office, 1906 - International law
 

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Page 718 - ultimo, a copy of which you transmit. " In answer to the first point presented by you, I may observe that on the 27th of July, 1868, Congress declared that the right of expatriation is a natural and inherent right of all people, indispensable to the enjoyment of ' life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.
Page 157 - vicinity thereof, or should. occupy or fortify or colonize or assume or exercise any dominion over Nicaragua, Costa Rica, the Mosquito coast, or any part of Central America.' "So far as the United States and Great Britain were concerned, these stipulations were expressed in unmistakable terms, and in reference
Page 799 - the place where a person lives or has his home;" and, in " a strict and legal sense," as the place " where he has his true, fixed, permanent home, and principal establishment, and to which, whenever he is absent, he has the intention of returning.
Page 254 - war as in time of peace, to every vessel of commerce or of war. without distinction of flag. Consequently, the High Contracting Parties agree not in any way to interfere with the free use of the Canal, in time of war as in time of peace. The Canal shall never
Page 272 - the Revised Statutes of the United States, incorporating the provisions of the act of February 10, 1855. "All children heretofore born or hereafter born out of the limits and jurisdiction of the United States, whose fathers were or may be at the time of their birth citizens thereof,
Page 507 - all children" born or hereafter born out of the limits and jurisdiction of the United States, whose fathers were or may be, at the time of their birth, citizens thereof, are to be declared ' to be citizens of the United States; but
Page 276 - all children heretofore or hereafter born out of the limits and jurisdiction of the United States whose fathers were or may be at the time of their birth citizens thereof are declared to be citizens of the United States; but the rights of citizenship shall not descend to children whose fathers have never resided in the United States,
Page 10 - perfect neutrality of the before-mentioned Isthmus,' but they have further obliged themselves to 'also guarantee in the same manner the rights of sovereignty and property which New Granada has and possesses over the said territory.' While, therefore, the United States have perfect confidence in these representations, as well as in the
Page 225 - and shall be maintained and protected in the free enjoyment of their liberty, property, and religion. The uncivilized tribes will be subject to such laws and regulations as the United States may from time to time adopt in regard to aboriginal tribes of that country.', In all these cases, as will
Page 287 - Congress having declared by resolution that the people of the island of Cuba " are and of right ought to be free and independent," and the status of the island in this regard not having been changed by the treaty with Spain of December 10,

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