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ty showed the interest which he took in the welfare of both parties.

Wherever the United States may treat, they will treat with the sincere desire they have repeatedly manifested, of terminating the present contest with Great Britain on conditions of reciprocity consistent with the rights of both parties, as sovereign and independent nations, and calculated not only to establish present harmony, but to provide, as far as possible, against future collisions which might interrupt it.

Before giving an answer to the proposition communicated by your lordship, to treat with the United States independently of the Russian mediation, it would have been agreeable to the President to have heard from the plenipotentiaries of the United States sent to St. Petersburg. The offer of a mediation by one power, and the acceptance of it by another, forms a relation between them, the delicacy of which cannot but be felt. From the known character however of the emperor, and the benevolent views with which his mediation was offered, the President cannot doubt that he will see with satisfaction a concurrence of the United States in an alternative, which, under existing circumstances, affords the best prospect of obtaining speedily what was the object of his interposition. I am accordingly instructed to make known to your lordship, for the information of his royal highness the prince regent, that the President accedes to his proposition, and will take the measures depending on him for carrying it into effect at Gottenburg, with as little delay as possible; it being presumed, that his majesty the king of Sweden, as the friend of both parties, will readily acquiesce in the choice of a place for their pacifick negotiations, within his dominions.

The President is duly sensible of the attention of his royal highness the prince regent, in giving the orders to the admiral commanding the British squadron on this coast, which your lordship has communicated. I have the honour to be, &c.

JAMES MONROE.

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MESSAGE

FROM THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES TO THE HOUSE

OF REPRESENTATIVES. JAN. 18, 1814. I TRANSMIT to the House of Representatives a report of the Secretary of State, complying with their resolution of the 13th inst.

JAMES MADISON.

REPORT. The Secretary of State, to whom was referred the resolution of the House of Representatives, of the 13th inst. requesting the President to lay before the house such documents relative to the Russian mediation, as in his opinion it may not be improper to communicate, has the honour to transmit to the President, for the information of the House, the following letters in relation to that subject, viz:

A letter in French (with a translation) from Mr. Daschkoff, envoy extraordinary and minister plenipotentiary of his majesty the emperor of Russia, to the Secretary of State, of the 8th March, 1813, with the answer of the Secretary of State of the 11th March.

An extract of a letter from the Secretary of State to Mr. Adams, minister of the United States at St. Petersburg, of the 1st July, 1812, and four letters and extracts from Mr. Adams to the Secretary of State, bearing date respectively on the 30th Sept. 17th Oct. and 11th Dec. 1812, and on the 26th June, 1813. All which is respectfully submitted.

JAMES MONROE. Department of State, Jan. 18, 1814.

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TRANSLATION.

Mr. De Daschkof, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister

Plenipotentiary of His Imperial Majesty the Emperor of all the Russias, to the Secretary of State of the United States.

The undersigned, envoy extraordinary and minister plenipotentiary of his majesty the emperor of all the Russias, has the honour to make known to the Secretary of State of the United States of America, that he has just received orders from the emperor his master, to make the following overture to his excellency the President of the United States.

The peace of Russia with England seemed to present this immense advantage to the commerce of nearly all sea faring people, that it freed their relations from that constraint, from that continual vexation to which it had been subjected for many years without intermission. The emperor viewed with pleasure a result so conformable to all his wishes, and which appeared as not being at all doubt. ful. It became so, however, by the war between England and America.

The undersigned is directed to express to the President of the United States the regret with which his imperial majesty foresees the great shackles which this new episode is about to oppose to the commercial prosperity of nations. The love of humanity and what he owes to his subjects, whose commerce has already sufficiently suffered, command him to do every thing in his power to remove the evils which this war is preparing even for those nations who will not take part in it.

His majesty, who takes pleasure in doing justice to the wisdom of the government of the United States of America, is convinced that it has done all that it could do to prevent this rupture, but that treating of it directly would take away from the negotiation all semblance of impartiality. In a direct discussion, every thing would tend to excite the prejudices and the asperity of the parties. To obviate this inconvenience his majesty the emperor, gratified at being able to give a proof of his friendship alike for his majesty the king of Great Britain and the United

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States of America, wished to offer to them his mediation, and charged the undersigned to propose it to the President of the United States.

The undersigned baving the honour to communicate to the Secretary of State the sentiments and the wishes of his imperial majesty, begs him to make them known to the President of the United States. The emperor would feel great satisfaction if a like disposition on the part of the government of the United States should have the effect of stopping the progress of this new war, and of extinguishing it in its origin. From the satisfactory assurances which the President of the United States has constantly given to the undersigned of the sentiments of regard and friendship on the part of the United States, and of his excellency for Russia, and particularly for the august person of his majesty, he cannot but flatter himself that he will receive an answer which shall correspond with the generous wishes of the emperor his master.

The undersigned cannot refrain from expressing on this occasion, to the Secretary of State, his individual wishes for whatever may have a tendency to re-establish active relations between Russia and the United States, and to advance the prosperity of the Republick.

He seizes with eagerness this occasion to renew to the Secretary of State the assurance of his highest consideration and respect.

ANDRE DE DASCHKOFF. Washington, 24th Feb. (March 8) 1813.

The Secretary of State to Mr. Daschkoff. Department of

State, March 11, 1813. Sir, I have had the honour to receive your note of the 8th inst. making known to the President of the United States the disposition of his majesty the emperor of Russia, to promote peace, by his friendly mediation, between the United States and Great Britain.

I am instructed by the President to assure you, that he sees in this overture, on the part of your sovereign, strong proofs of that humane and enlightened policy, which have characterized his reign. It was impossible that a var between the United States and Great Britain should not materially affect the commerce of Russia, and it was worthy the high character of a prince, distinguished by his attachment to the interests of his people, to interpose his good offices for the restoration of peace. The President sees, at the same time, in this overture, and in the circumstances attending it, a strong proof of the friendly interest which his imperial majesty takes in the welfare of the United States.

The United States, conscious that they were not the aggressors in this contest; that on the contrary, they had borne great wrongs for a series of years, before they appealed to arms in defence of their rights, are willing and ready to lay them down as soon as Great Britain ceases to violate those rights.

The President is aware that many of the inconveniences resulting from a direct communication between the parties themselves may be avoided, by the mediation of a third power, especially one entitled to, and possessing the entire confidence of both the belligerents. To the claim of Russia to that distinguished consideration, the President does not hesitate to express on the part of the United States his full acknowledgment. He recollects with much satisfaction that during

a period of great and general contention, the relations of friendship have always subsisted between the United States and Russia ; and he finds in the personal qualities, and high character of the emperor Alexander, a sacred pledge for the justice and impartiality which may be expected from his interposition.

Influenced by these sentiments, the President instructs me to inform you, that he willingly accepts the mediation of your sovereign to promote peace between the United States and Great Britain. I am instructed also to state, that such arrangements will be made, without delay, as will afford to his imperial majesty the opportunity he has invited, to interpose his good offices for the accomplishment of so important an event. Of these arrangements I shall have the honour to advise you in an early communication. I have the honour to be, &c.

JAMES MONROE.

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