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ment. The return of their messenger may perhaps dis-
close the motive of their reluctance in that respect.
We have the honour to be, &c.

JOHN QUINCY ADAMS,
J. A. BAYARD,
H. CLAY,
JONATHAN RUSSELL.

Draught of original Protocol made by the American Minis

ters, of the two first conferences held with the Britisk Commissioners.

At a meeting between the commissioners of his Britannick majesty, and those of the United States of America, for negotiating and concluding a peace, held at Ghent, August 8, 1914, the following points were presented by the commissioners, on the part of Great Britain, as subjects for discussion.

1. The forcible seizure of mariners on board of mer. chant vessels, and the claim of allegiance of his Britan. nick majesty, upon all the native born subjects of Great Britain.

2. The Indian allies of Great Britain to be included in the pacification, and a boundary to be settled between the dominions of the Indians, and those of the United States. Both parts of this point are considered by the British government as a sine qua non to the conclusion of a treaty.

3. The revision of the boundary line between the territories of the United States, and those of Great Britain adjoining them in North America.

4. Thc fisheries-respecting which, the British government will not allow the people of the United States the privilege of landing and drying fish within the territorial jurisdiction of Great Britain, without an equivalent.

The American commissioners were requested to say, whether their instructions from their government authorized them to treat upon these several points; and to state, on their part, such other points as they might be further instructed to propose for discussion.

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'The meeting was adjourned to Tuesday, the 9th of August, on which day the commissioners met again.

The American commissioners, at this meeting, stated, that upon the first and third points proposed by the British commissioners, they were provided with instructions from their government; and that on the second and fourth of those points, there not having existed, heretofore, any differences between the two governments, they had not been anticipated by the government of the United States, and were therefore not provided for in their instructions. That in relation to an Indian pacification, they knew that the government of the United States had appointed commissioners to treat of peace with the Indians; and that it was not improbable that peace had been made with them.

The American commissioners presented, as further points (subjects,) considered by the government of the United States, as suitable for discussion.

1. A definition of blockade, and, as far as may be agreed, of other neutral and belligerent rights.

2. Certain claims of indemnity to individuals, for captures and seizures preceding and subsequent to the war.

3. They further stated, that there were various other points to which their instructions extended, which might with propriety be objects of discussion, either in the negotiation of the peace, or in that of a treaty of commerce, which, in the case of a propitious termination of the present conferences, they were likewise authorized to conclude. That for the purpose of facilitating the first and most essential object of peace, they had discarded every subject which was not considered as peculiarly connected with that; and presented only those points which appeared to be immediately relevant to this negotiation.

The American commissioners expressed their wish to receive from the British commissioners a statement of the views and objects of Great Britain, upon all the points, and their willingness to discuss them all, in order that, if no arrangement could be agreed to, upon the points not in their instructions, which would come within the scope of the powers committed to their discretion, the government of the United States might be put in possession of the entire and precise intentions of that of Great Britain,

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with regard to such points; and that the British government might be fully informed of the objections on the part of the United States to any such arrangement.

They, the American commissioners, were asked, whether, if those of Great Britain should enter further upon the discussion, particularly respecting the Indian boundary, the American commissioners could expect that it would terminate by some provisional arrangement, which they could conclude, subject to the ratification of their government ?

They answered, that as any arrangement to which they could agree upon the subjeci, must be without specifick authority from their government, it was not possible for them, previous to discussion, to decide, whether an article on the subject could be formed, which would be mutually satisfactory, and to which they should think themselves, under their discretionary powers, justified in acceding.

The British commissioners declined entering upon the discussion, unless the American commissioners would say that they considered it within their discretion to make a provisional arrangement on the subject, conformable to the view of it prescribed by the British government, and proposed to adjourn the conferences, for the purpose of consulting their own government on this state of things.

The British commissioners were asked, whether it was understood, as an effect of the proposed boundary for the Indians, that the United States would be precluded from the right of purchasing territory from the Indians within that boundary, by amicable treaty with the Indians themselves, without the.consent of Great Britain ? and whether it was understood to operate as a restriction upon the Indians, from selling, by such amicable treaties, lands to the United States, as has been hitherto practised.

They answered, that it was understood, that the Indian territories should be a barrier between the British possessions and those of the United States; that the United States and Great Britain should both be restricted from such purchases of lands; but that the Indians would not be restricted from selling them to any third party.

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The meeting was adjourned to Wednesday, 10th of August.

C. HUGHES, JUN. Secretary to the Mission Extraordinary.

True copy,

Protocol of Conference, August 8, 1814. The British and American commissioners having met, their full powers were respectively produced, which were found satisfactory, and copies thereof were exchanged.

The British commissioners stated the following subjects, as those upon which, it appeared to them, that the discussions between themselves, and the American commissioners, would be likely to turn.

1. The forcible seizure of mariners from on board mer. chant ships on the high seas, and in connection with it, the right of the king of Great Britain to the allegiance of all his native subjects.

2. That the peace be extended to the Indian allies of Great Britain, and that the boundary of their territory be definitively marked out, as a permanent barrier between the dominions of Great Britain and the United States. An arrangement on this subject to be a sine qua non of a treaty of peace.

3. A revision of the boundary line between the British and American territories, with the view to prevent future uncertainty and dispute.

The British commissioners requested information, whether the American commissioners were instructed to enter into negotiation on the above points ? but before they desired any answer, they felt it right to communicate the intentions of their government, as to the North American fisheries, viz: That the British government did not intend to grant to the United States, gratuitously, the privileges formerly granted by treaty to them, of fishing within the limits of the British sovereignty, and of using the shores of the British territories for purposes connected with the fisheries.

August 9. The meeting being adjourned to the 9th of August, the commissioners met again on that day.

The American commissioners at this meeting stated, that upon the first and third points proposed by the British commissioners, they were provided with instructions from their government; and that the second and fourth of these points, were not provided for in their instructions. That in relation to an Indian pacification, they knew that the government of the United States had appointed commissioners to treat of peace with the Indians; and that it was not improbable that peace had been made with them.

The American commissioners presented as farther subjects, considered by the government of the United States, as suitable for discussion :

1. A definition of blockade, and as far as may be agreed, of other neutral and belligerent rights.

2. Certain claims to indemnity for captures and seizures preceding and subsequent to the war.

3. They further stated, that there were various other points, to which their instructions extended, which might with propriety be objects of discussion, either in the ne-. gotiation of the peace, or in that of a treaty of commerce; which, in the case of a propitious termination of the present conferences, they were likewise authorized to conclude. That for the purpose of facilitating the first and most essential object of peace, they had discarded every subject which was not considered as peculiarly connected with that, and presented only those points which appeared to be immediately relevant to this negotiation.

The American commissioners expressed their wish to receive from the British commissioners, a statement of the views and objects of Great Britain upon all the points, and their willingness to discuss them all.

They, the American commissioners, were asked, whether, if those of Great Britain should enter further upon this discussion, particularly respecting the Indian boundary, the American commissioners could expect that it would terminate by some provisional arrangement, which they could conclude, subject to the ratification of their government ?

They answered, that as any arrangement to which they could agree upon the subject, must be without specifick

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