The United Service Journal and Naval and Military Magazine, Part 3

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Page 201 - I've met with many a breeze before. But never such a blow!" Then reading on his 'bacco box. He heaved a heavy sigh. And then began to eye his pipe, And then to pipe his eye. And then he tried to sing ' All's Well,' But could not, though he tried; His head was turned — and so he chewed His pigtail till he died.
Page 177 - On a bed of green sea-flowers thy limbs shall be laid, — Around thy white bones the red coral shall grow; Of thy fair yellow locks threads of amber be made, And every part suit to thy mansion below.
Page 412 - ... 30 miles of the adjacent coast, or that to the north of the isthmus, which, by also taking a westerly direction, formed the termination of the western sea into a gulf. The rest of this season was employed in tracing the sea-coast south of the isthmus leading to the eastward, which was done...
Page 254 - They continued to advance till within fifty or sixty paces of the bank ; when the brigade had the order to stand up. Whether it was the sudden and unexpected appearance of a corps so near them, which must have seemed as starting out of the ground, or the tremendously heavy fire we threw into them, these men, who had never before failed, suddenly stopped.
Page 413 - Fury Beach, being the only chance left of saving our lives; owing to the very rugged nature of the ice, we were obliged to keep either upon or close to the land, making the circuit of every bay, thus...
Page 412 - Commander Ross, who volunteered this service early in April, and, accompanied by one of the mates, and guided by two of the natives, proceeded to the spot, and found that the north land was connected to the south by two ridges of high land, 15 miles in breadth, but, taking into account a chain of fresh-water lakes, which occupied the valleys between, the dry land which actually separates the two oceans is only five miles. This extraordinary isthmus was subsequently visited by myself, when Commander...
Page 412 - At this extreme point our progress was arrested on tke 1st of October by an impenetrable barrier of ice. We, however, found an excellent wintering port, which we named Felix Harbour. " Early in January, 1830, we had the good fortune to establish a friendly intercourse with a most interesting consociation of natives, who, being insulated by nature, had never before communicated with strangers ; from them we gradually obtained the important information that we had already...
Page 299 - A species of men to whom a state of order would become a sentence of obscurity, are nourished into a dangerous magnitude by the heat of intestine disturbances ; and it is no wonder that, by a sort of sinister piety, they cherish, in their turn, the disorders which are the parents of all their consequence.
Page 412 - America, that about forty miles to the SW there were two great seas, one to the west, which was divided from that to the east by a narrow strait or neck of land. The verification of this intelligence either way, on which our future operations so materially depended, devolved on Commander Ross, who volunteered...
Page 412 - It was also determined that there was no passage to the westward for 30 miles to the northward of our position. " This summer, like that of 1818, was beautifully fine, but extremely unfavourable for navigation, and our object being now to try a more northern latitude, we waited with anxiety for the disruption of the ice, but in vain, and our utmost endeavours did not succeed in retracing our steps more than four miles, and it was not until the middle of November that we succeeded in cutting the vessel...

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