Select Charters and Other Illustrations of English Constitutional History: From the Earliest Times to the Reign of Edward the First

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William Stubbs
Clarendon Press, 1905 - Constitutional history - 554 pages
 

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Page 510 - That no foreign prince, person, prelate, state, or potentate hath, or ought to have any jurisdiction, power, superiority, pre-eminence, or authority, ecclesiastical or spiritual, within this realm: So help me God.
Page 509 - I, AB, do sincerely promise and swear, that I will be faithful and bear true allegiance to Their Majesties King William and Queen Mary.
Page 509 - And that for redress of all grievances, and for the amending, strengthening and preserving of the laws, Parliaments ought to be held frequently.
Page 508 - ... of this nation, taking into their most serious consideration the best means for attaining the ends aforesaid; do in the first place (as their ancestors in like case have usually done) for the vindicating and asserting their ancient rights and liberties, declare: 1. That the pretended power of suspending of laws, or the * 1689 (New Style). execution of laws, by regal authority, without consent of parliament, is illegal.
Page 515 - That after the said limitation shall take effect as aforesaid, judges' commissions be made Quamdiu se bene gesserint, and their salaries ascertained and established ; but upon the address of both Houses of Parliament it may be lawful to remove them.
Page 512 - ... for preserving a certainty in the succession thereof, in and upon which the unity, peace, tranquillity and safety of this nation doth under God wholly consist and depend, the said Lords Spiritual and Temporal and Commons do beseech their Majesties...
Page 499 - Statutum de tallagio non concedendo, that no tallage or aid shall be laid or levied by the King or his heirs in this realm, without the good will and assent of the Archbishops, Bishops, Earls, Barons, Knights, Burgesses, and other the freemen of the commonalty of this realm...
Page 508 - And several grants and promises made of fines and forfeitures before any conviction or judgment against the persons upon whom the same were to be levied. All which are utterly and directly contrary to the known laws and statutes and freedom of this realm.
Page 507 - Whereas the late king James the Second by the assistance of divers evil counsellors, judges and ministers employed by him did endeavour to subvert and extirpate the Protestant religion and the laws and liberties of this kingdom.
Page 511 - ... during their lives and the life of the survivor of them; and that the sole and full exercise of the regal power be only in and executed by the said prince of Orange...

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