Handbuch des Oeffentlichen Rechts: Einleitungsband, Volume 2

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Mohr, 1899
 

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Page 245 - That all men are by nature equally free and independent, and have certain inherent rights, of which, when they enter into a state of society, they cannot by any compact deprive or divest their posterity; namely, the enjoyment of life and liberty, with the means of acquiring and possessing property, and pursuing and obtaining happiness and safety.
Page 245 - Le but de toute association politique est la conservation des droits naturels et imprescriptibles de l'homme.
Page 246 - That all power is vested in, and consequently derived from, the people; that magistrates are their trustees and servants, and at all times amenable to them.
Page 314 - That levying money for or to the use of the crown, by pretence of prerogative, without grant of parliament, for longer tune, or in other manner than the same is or shall be granted, is illegal.
Page 245 - La liberté consiste à pouvoir faire tout ce qui ne nuit pas à autrui; ainsi l'exercice des droits naturels de chaque homme n'a de bornes que celles qui assurent aux autres membres de la société la jouissance de ces mêmes droits; ces bornes ne peuvent être déterminées que par la loi.
Page 321 - Le Sénat a, concurremment avec la Chambre des députés, l'initiative et la confection des lois. || Toutefois les lois de finances doivent être, en premier lieu, présentées à la Chambre des députés et votées par elle.
Page 239 - But though men when they enter into society give up the equality, liberty, and executive power they had in the state of Nature into the hands of the society, to be so far disposed of by the legislative as the good of the society shall require, yet it being only with an intention in every one the better to preserve himself, his liberty and property (for no rational creature can be supposed to change his condition with an intention to be worse...
Page 246 - His meaning, as his own words import, and still more conclusively as illustrated by the example in his eye, can amount to no more than this, that where the whole power of one department is exercised by the same hands which possess the whole power of another department, the fundamental principles of a free constitution are subverted.
Page 228 - This therefore contains the power of war and peace, leagues and alliances, and all the transactions with all persons and communities without the commonwealth, and may be called federative if any one pleases.
Page 247 - Each individual of the society has a right to be protected by it in the enjoyment of his life, liberty, and property, according to standing laws.

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