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I have the honor to inclose herewith, with a copy of his answer, a copy of my letter to Rev. Mr. Entzminger exhorting him and his religious coworkers to avoid intemperate language against those who differ with them in religious belief. I have, etc.,

CHARLES PAGE BRYAN.

[Inclosure 1.)

Mr. Bryan to Rev. Entzminger.
LEGATION OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA,

Petropolis, Brazil, April 26, 1901. Dear Sir: Complying with my promise to you, I called yesterday on Gen. Quintino Bocayuva and I believe accomplished what we desire. Reviewing the facts related in your written and verbal communications regarding the attack on your church and the destruction of the property of the American Baptist Society, I stated that I had come unofficially to him as President of the State of Rio de Janeiro before making any diplomatic representations on behalf of my country people. He expressed gratification at this considerate method of procedure and promised that, ife you would send him a statement of the losses incurred by your society, he would give the same careful attention. President Bocayuva said that he had ordered prompt police protection for the other missions, and I inferred that he wishes that full atonement be made for the outrageous attack on your church. He, however, expressed indignation at the tone of the ex-priest's utterances in regard to his former religious associates. This violent talk the President regarded as having provoked the lamentable attack of which you and your congregation were the innocent victims.

I can not too strongly exhort my countrymen in Brazil to use moderation of speech regarding the religion and institutions of the land where they are living. They likewise would do well to counsel their colaborers of other nationalities to pursue a like course of Christian charity. I feel sure this is the policy you yourself have been following Hoping all will come right for you, I am, etc.,

CHARLES PAGE BRYAN.

[Inclosure 2.)
Mr. Entzminger to Mr. Bryan.

R10 DE JANEIRO, April 27, 1901. MY VERY DEAR Sır: Your kind and considerate favor of the 26th instant received and contents carefully noted. Please accept my hearty thanks for the service rendered, which promises to end well. I am glad to say that I am in full agreement with your observations about prudence in attacking the religion and institutions of the country. So far as I am acquainted with the work in general this is the policy in vogue, with possibly some exceptions. The list you request to be sent to the President of the State will be attended to promptly. For the present our services are entirely suspended in Nictheroy from the lack of a house and the necessary furniture. I can do nothing toward the equipment of another hall until remunerated for the property destroyed. Wishing you every happiness, etc.,

W. E. ENTZMINGER.

Mr. Bryan to Mr. Ilay.
No. 323. ] LEGATION OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA,

Petropolis, Brazil, May 20, 1901. Sir: Referring to the subject of my No. 318, of the 2d instant-the attack upon the Baptist mission church in Nictheroy-1 have the honor to report the gratifying information that, as promised me by General Bocayuva, the president of the state, the authorities of Rio de Janerio promptly paid the amount of damages demanded by the American Baptist Society for the destruction of their property by the mob. In confirmation hereof I inclose a copy of a letter from Rev. W. E. Entzminger. I have, etc.,

CHARLES PAGE BRYAN.

[Inclosure.]
Mr. Entzminger to Mr Bryan.

Rio, Box 252, May 17, 1901. MY DEAR Sir: It becomes my delightful duty to inform you that the matter between myself and the president of the State of Rio, His Excellency Gen. Quintino Bocayuva, was promptly and satisfactorily dispatched by his excellency.

I take occasion to once more express my hearty appreciation, and to return thanks for your very kind offices. Very respectfully,

W. E. ENTZMINGER.

Mr. Hay to Mr. Bryan. No. 241.]

DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

Washington, May 31, 1901. Sir: I have to acknowledge the receipt of your No. 318, of the 2d instant, reporting the sack of an American Baptist church by a Catholic mob at Nictheroy and your unofficial conference with the president of the State, during which you discussed the case.

In reply I have to say that the Department approves your course thus far, and will be glad to learn of the further developments of the

case.

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Mr. Hay to Mr. Bryan. No. 244.]

DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

Washington, June 19, 1901. SIR: The Department has been gratified to receive your No. 323, of the 20th ultimo, reporting that the government of the State of Rio de Janeiro has promptly settled for the damages done by the mob to the American Baptist mission at Nictheroy. The course pursued by you in the matter is commended. I am, etc.,

JOHN HAY.

RIOTS IN RIO DE JANEIRO OVER INCREASE IN STREET RAILWAY

FARES.

Mr. Bryan to Mr. Hay.
No. 339.] LEGATION OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA,

Petropolis, Brazil, July 3, 1901. Sir: I have the honor to report that serious disturbances occurred in Rio de Janeiro on the night of Saturday, June 18, and thereafter almost continuously until the night of Wednesday, June 22, when quiet was at last completely restored.

Under the terms of its contract recently concluded with the Govern. ment the São Christovão Street Railroad Company, one of three large companies operating street-car lines in the city and suburbs of Rio de Janeiro, raised its fares. Its lines serve the commercial and the poorest residental portions of the city, and this increase of fares met with determined and forcible resistance. Attacks were made on the cars on the night of the 18th, and some of them were burned. A large body of police succceded in dispersing the crowd of rioters, but on Sunday the disturbance continued, and on Monday six cars were burned in the Largo de São Francisco, which was finally cleared by the police only after several persons were wounded. On Tuesday, the 22d, barricades were built in the Ouvidor and other important business streets in the vicinity of the Largo de São Francisco, which is an important square in the heart of the city, and the streets were kept clear only by repeated charges of both cavalry and infantry. On Wednesday much the same sort of occurrences took place as on the preceding day, but before nightfall quiet had been restored by the company's announcement of a return to the old schedule of fares.

During the five days' disturbance at least five people were killed and the number of wounded is variously estimated at from one hundred to over two hundred. In spite, however, of the serious nature of the disturbances, any attempts that may have been made by disaffected elements in the community to swell them into a revolutionary movement were entirely abortive. Popular indignation against the company limited itself to sporadic attacks on the company's property and seemed not to concern itself with the Government's connection with the matter. The police roused almost universal protest by their recklessness and severity, but the only demonstrations against them were entirely unorganized and almost puerile. They were apparently directed, too, against the police as individuals rather than as constituted Government authorities, and the only legal questions as yet growing out of the disturbances have been suits instituted against individual police officers and men for undue violence. The fact that order was completely reestablished immediately upon the reinstatement of the old fare schedule is sufficient proof that the disturbances had no political significance whatever. I have, etc.,

CHARLES PAGE BRYAN.

CONDOLENCES ON ASSASSINATION OF PRESIDENT MCKINLEY.

President Campos Salles to the Vice-President of the United States.

[Telegram.]

RIO DE JANEIRO, September 14, 1901. I desire to extend to your excellency expression of my profound sorrow at the loss which the American nation has just suffered in the death of its First Magistrate.

M. FERRAZ DE CAMPOS SALLES, President of the United States of Brazil.

Mr. Ilay to Mr. Bryan.
[Telegram.]

DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

Washington, September 16, 1901. Please express in the name of President Roosevelt heartfelt thanks for condolence of President Campos. Our people greatly esteem Brazilian sympathy.

Hay.

CHILE.

PASSPORT APPLICATION OF A PORTO RICAN.

Mr. Lenderink to Mr. Ilay.

No. 185.]

LEGATION OF THE UNITED STATES,

Santiago, March 25, 1901. Sir: I am in receipt of an application for a passport from Isadoro Solis Marrero, a native of Porto Rico, who claims to be a loyal citizen of the United States. The applicant has resided in Chile since the year 1884, and now proposes to return to Porto Rico, within two years, to perform the duties of a citizen there.

As section 7 of the act to provide revenues and a civil government for Porto Rico, approved April 12, 1900, provides that all inhabitants continuing to reside therein, who were Spanish subjects on the 11th day of April, 1899, and then resided in Porto Rico, and their children born subsequent thereto, shall be deemed and held to be citizens of Porto Rico, and as such entitled to the protection of the United States," I am rather doubtful whether I am authorized to issue a pass. port to this applicant, he not residing on the island at the time specified in the law. For that reason I beg to refer the matter to the Department for its instruction. I have, etc.,

HENRY J. LENDERINK.

Mr. Hill to Mr. Lenderink.

No. 188.]

DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

Washington, April 29, 1901. SIR: I have to acknowledge the receipt of your No. 185, of the 25th ultimo, reporting the application for a passport of Mr. Isadoro Solis Marrero, a native of Porto Rico, who has resided in Chile since 1884, and who proposes to return to Porto Rico within two years.

You ask for instructions from the Department. In reply I have to say that the language of the Porto Rican law is to be construed in its general legal sense, in which continual personal presence is not necessary to constitute continuous residence. A native of Porto Rico who makes it the place of his permanent domicile does not, therefore, lose the benefits of the act because he was temporarily abiding elsewhere when it went into effect.

As regards the protection which you should accord, a Porto Rican is entitled under the law to the fullest protection. The legation should see that the applicant enjoys every right and that no obstacle be placed in the way of his contemplated departure from Chile for Porto Rico. It is deemed wise, at this time, to defer issuing passports to Porto Ricans until the Supreme Court of the United States shall have rendered its decision defining their status. In explanation of the Department's attitude on this subject, I inclose a copy of a letter to Messrs. Mulholland and Hickcox, of New York, dated April 24, 1901. I am., etc.,

DAVID J. HILL,

Acting Secretary.

[Inclosure.]

Mr. Hay to Messrs. Mulholland and Hickcox.'

DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

Washington, April 24, 1901. GENTLEMEN: The Department has received your letter of April 23, resubmitting the application for a passport of Mr. Pedro A. Fernandez with corroborative testimony of two witnesses, who state that he is, as he alleges, a native of Porto Rico and now resident in the United States, this testimony being in reply to the Department's request therefor of April 20.

The truth of Mr. Fernandez's allegations thus appears to be established, and he is under the law entitled to the protection of the United States as a citizen of Porto Rico. The precise status of citizens of that island is, however, now awaiting judicial definition by the Supreme Court of the United States, and the form of the passport which this Department might issue in Mr. Fernandez's favor would be materially affected by the decision of the court, which is daily expected. It is not, therefore, deemed advisable, at this time, to issue a passport in Mr. Fernandez's favor, but you are advised that he may proceed upon his travels, and in case of his requiring such protection as a diplomatic or consular officer of the United States may properly render, he is authorized to apply to the nearest one and present this letter as his authorization for so doing. I am, etc.,

John Hay.

COURTESIES OF CHILEAN OFFICIALS IN CONNECTION WITH REMOVAL OF REMAINS OF THE LATE LIEUT. S. E. WOODWORTH, U. 8. N.

Mr. Hay to Mr. Lenderink.

No. 183.]

DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

Washington, March 28, 1901. SIR: I inclose copy of a portion of the report made by the commanding officer of the U.S. S. Philadelphia, relative to the courtesies and aid extended to him by the Chilean authorities in removing the remains of Lieut. Selim E. Woodworth, United States Navy, from the cemetery at Valparaiso.

You will advise the Chilean foreign office that this Government sincerely appreciates the courtesies extended. I am, etc.,

JOHN HAY.

(Inclosure.)

Mr. Long to Mr. Hay.

NAVY DEPARTMENT,

Washington, March 23, 1901. Sir: The Department transmits herewith for the information of the State Department a copy of a report from the commanding officer of the U. S. S. Philadelphia in regard to the exhumation at Valparaiso, Chile, of the remains of the late Lieut. nelim E. Woodworth, United States Navy, and their subsequent buriai at sea.

FR 1901- -3

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