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The Department invites particular attention to the eighth paragraph of the report, and would be gratified if it should meet with the view of the State Department to communicate to the Chilean Government its appreciation of the courtesies rendered by Chilean officials in connection with this matter. Very respectfully,

John D. LONG,

Secretary.

[Subinclosure.)

Captain Mead to Commander in Chief.

U. S. S. PHILADELPHIA, At Sea, February 18, 1901. SIR: I have the honor to report that in obedience to Navy Department's order to the commander in chief, United States naval force, Pacific Station, directing that when a vessel of his command visits Valparaiso the remains of the late Lieut. Selim E. Woodworth, United States Navy, be exhumed and buried, I have this day buried at sea, in position indicated by latitude and longitude given above, and about 15 miles off the coast of Chile, the remains of the late Selim E. Woodworth, United States Navy.

On arrival at Valparaiso it was learned, through the United States consul, that a law of the country prohibited the exhumation of a body before the expiration of one year from the date of burial. As Lieutenant Woodworth died only about six months previous, there might be some difficulty in obtaining the necessary authority.

Application was, however, at once made to the intendente of Valparaiso and by him referred to the minister of interior of Santiago, who immediately granted my request for the removal of the remains.

Lieut. G. H. Burrage, United States Navy, attached to this vessel, was placed in charge to make all arrangements for the disinterment and embarkation of the body, having as an assistant Dr. McCullough, United States Navy. These officials engaged the same undertaker who officiated at the original burial, and were thus assured as to the correct location of the body, which had been placed in the Protestant cemetery in a numbered cemented niche, as is the custom in Chile.

Ön the morning of February 18, 1901, Lieutenant Burrage and Dr. McCullough witnessed and attended the removal and embarkation of the body. A municipal regulation required the casket to be inclosed in a zinc-lined case before removal from the cemetery, and this was attended to by the undertakers.

When the body was placed in the boat our flag was half-masted, in which mark of respect we were joined by the Chilean squadron of five vessels at anchor in the bay.

After the reception of the body on board, this vessel proceeded to sea, and at 2.45 p. m. the remains of the late Lieut. Selim E. Woodworth were committed to the deep with the burial service of the Episcopal church, read by Chaplain Boorom, United States Navy, all hands being called, and the ceremonies observed as prescribed in the United States Navy Regulations. The body was left in the original casket, this being inclosed in the zinc-lined case, and all sunk by a heavy weight lashed securely.

In concluding I wish to call special attention to the courtesy of the Chilean officials in connection with this matter. It was necessary to waive the law governing disinterment, yet I everywhere met with the most cordial and friendly assistance, and experienced no difficulty in obtaining the necessary permit, which I herewith inclose, as it may be of interest to the family of the late Lieutenant Woodworth. Very respectfully,

W. W. MEAD, Captain, United States Navy, Commanding.

Mr. Lenderink to Mr. Hay. No. 191.)

LEGATION OF THE UNITED STATES,

Santiago, May 13, 1901. Sir: I have the honor to acknowledge receipt of the Department's No. 183, instructing me to express to the Chilean foreign office the sincere appreciation of the Government of the United States for the courtesies and aid extended by the Chilean authorities to the officers of the U. S. S. Philadelphia in the removal of the remains of Lieut. Selim E. Woodworth, United States Navy, from the cemetery at Valparaiso.

In compliance with your instructions I have addressed a note to the minister of foreign relations expressing the sincere appreciation of the Government of the United States for the courtesies extended to the officers aforesaid. I have, etc.,

HENRY J. LENDERINK.

VISIT OF CHILEAN TRAINING SHIP GENERAL BAQUEDANO TO

THE UNITED STATES.

Señor Morla Vicuña to Mr. Hay.

LEGATION DE CHILE,

Washington, June 26, 1901. Sır: The Chilean training ship General Baquedano, recently returned to Chile from a voyage of instruction along the west coast of South and North America and over the eastern seas of Japan, China, and Australia, is being sent out again on a similar voyage along the coasts of America on the Atlantic Ocean. In the course of her voyage the General Baquedano will visit the port of New York on the first days of September next, and shortly afterwards that of Philadelphia, and my Government instructs me to request from the Government of the United States, through the State Department, the permission necessary for the commander, officers, and naval cadets belonging to the said training ship to visit the naval establishments existing in the two above-mentioned ports. With renewed assurances, etc.,

C. MORLA VICUÑA.

Mr. Hay to Señor Morla Vicuña. No. 43.]

DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

Washington, July 11, 1901. SIR: In reply to your note of the 26th ultimo, I have the honor to say that I am advised by the Secretary of the Navy that he has instructed the commandants at the New York and Philadelphia naval stations to offer all possible facilities for their inspection by the commander, officers, and naval cadets of the Chilean training ship General Baquedano. Accept, etc.,

JOHN HAY.

Señor Infante to Mr. Adee.

[Translation.]

LEGATION OF CHILE,

Washington, October 9, 1901. MR. SECRETARY: I am in receipt of instructions from the Government of Chile directing me to take such steps as may be required to obtain for the commander and officers of the training ship General Baquedano, at present anchored in the bay of New York, permission to deposit in the Washington Monument, on behalf of the people of Chile, a plaque commemorative of that illustrious leader of the American independence and founder of the Republic of the United States of America.

I shall be thankful if your excellency will kindly apply to appropriate authorities for the permission to place the said plaque, provided there should be no objection on your part. It is for me a pleasure, etc.,

E. INFANTE.

Mr. Hay to Señor Infante. No. 51.]

DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

Washington, January 11, 1902. Sir: In further reply to your note of October 9 last, stating that the commander and officers of the Chilean training ship General Baquedano desired to place in the Washington Monument a plate presented by the Government and people of Chile, I have the honor to say that I have just received a letter from the Assistant Secretary of War, stating that the Secretary of War has approved the recommendation of the Chief of Engineers that the tablet shall be accepted, and the Superintendent of Public Buildings and Grounds has been instructed to give it an appropriate place within the Monument.

It gives me pleasure to assure you that the Government of the United States deeply appreciates the cordial spirit of friendship manifested by the Government and people of Chile in the presentation of this tablet, and that it accepts it in the same spirit in which it is offered. Accept, etc.,

John Hay.

DEATH

OF THE

OF PRESIDENT ERRÁZURIZ—CONDOLENCES

UNITED STATES.

Mr. Wilson to Mr. Hay,

[Telegram.]
LEGATION OF THE UNITED STATES,

Santiago, Chile, July 14, 1901. Funeral of President Tuesday.

Wilson.

Mr. Hay to Mr. Wilson.
[Telegram.]

DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

Washington, July 15, 1901. The President of the United States conveys through you to the Government and the family of the late President Errázuriz his sincere sympathy.

HAY.

Mr. Wilson to Mr. Hay.

No. 203.]

LEGATION OF THE UNITED STATES,

Santiago, July 23, 1901. SIR: I have the honor to confirm my telegram of the 14th instant.

The President expired on Friday evening, July 12, but as the intelligence of his death was immediately communicated to the Chilean legation in Washington I did not deem it necessary to do more than advise the Department of the date of the funeral ceremonies, which date was afterwards changed to Wednesday, the 17th.

I beg also to confirm the receipt of the Department's telegram of the 15th instant.

This telegram was immediately communicated to the Chilean foreign office, together with a note, copy of which is inclosed.

Messages similar to that of the Department were received by all diplomatic representatives here and in most cases these messages of condolence were accompanied by instructions to send floral tributes in the name of the executive heads of their Governments. Under the circumstances it seemed to me proper to send some floral offering, and I therefore assumed the responsibility of purchasing a large artificial wreath, which I sent in the name of the President.

The death of the President was not unexpected. For the latter part of the year he has been considered in an extremely precarious condition; fülly one-half of this time he has been incapable of attending to his executive duties, and during the last three months he lost control completely of his mental faculties. His death being anticipated for so long a time rendered easy the transition of the executive power into the hands of the Vice-President. The acting President, Señor Zanartu, will retain the executive powers, which are in all respects equal to those of the deceased President, until the newly elected President, Señor Riesco, shall be inaugurated, September 18, 1901. I have, etc.,

HENRY L. WILSON.

[Inclosure.)

Mr. Wilson to Señor Rodriguez.

No. 172.]

LEGATION OF THE UNITED STATES,

Santiago, July 16, 1901. Mr. MINISTER: I have the honor to inform your excellency that I received last evening, from the Department of State at Washington, the following cablegram:

"The President of the United States conveys through you to the Government and the family of the late President Errázuriz his sincere sympathy."

The above reached my hands at 6 o'clock p. m., but as I found it impossible to communicate with your excellency's department last night it is only at this moment that I am able to transmit the message.

I beg to assure your excellency that the deplorable loss which the Government of Chile has just suffered in the death of its Chief Executive, His Excellency Don Fedrico Errázuriz Echaurren, has called forth the deep sympathy of the President of the United States and of the Government and people thereof.

My sad duty in expressing these sentiments would remain incomplete did I not in response to the desire of the President of the United States convey through your excellency's department to the Señora Jertrudis Echenique, viuda de Errázuriz his

a Printed ante.

sincere condolences for the irreparable misfortune which she has just sustained in the death of her distinguished husband, and express the hope that in the hour of her deep tribulation she may find Divine consolation. I gladly avail myself of this occasion to renew, etc.,

HENRY L. WILSON.

Mr. Wilson to Mr. Hay.

No. 207.]

LEGATION OF THE UNITED STATES,

Santiago, August 15, 1901. Sir: I have the honor to inclose herewith copy and translation of the reply of the Chilean minister of foreign relations to my note of condolence on the death of President Errázuriz. By an oversight my note was forwarded to the Department before the reply was received. I have, etc.,

HENRY L. WILSON.

Señor Rodriguez to Mr. Wilson.

[Inclosure.- Translation.) No. 703.]

REPUBLIC OF CHILE,
MINISTRY OF FOREIGN RELATIONS,

Santiago, July 22, 1901. Mr. MINISTER: The Chilean foreign office has received with genuine satisfaction your attentive note of the 16th instant, conveying the cablegram addressed to your legation by the Secretary of State of the United States of America, in which, in the name of the President, he sends to my Government his sincere sympathy for the death of His Excellency Federico Errázuriz.

It is very satisfactory to Chile that the great Republic of the North should take such cordial participation in this most lamentable national misfortune, and for that reason you will permit the undersigned, through your excellency, to express to His Excellency the President and the worthy Government of the United States of America the appreciation with which this Republic has received this delicate manifestation of condolence. I renew, etc.,

Luis M. RODRIGUEZ.

CONDOLENCES ON ASSASSINATION OF PRESIDENT M'KINLEY.

Vice-President Zanartu to the Vice-President of the United States.

[Telegram.)

SANTIAGO, CHILE, September 14, 1901. The people of Chile and its Government are astounded by the

apprehended issue of the abominable attempt at Buffalo. May Your Excellency and the American people be pleased to accept the most heartfelt condolences.

ANIBAL ZANARTU,
Vice-President of Chile.

Mr. Hay to Mr. Wilson.
[Telegram.)

DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

Washington, September 17, 1901. Please convey in the name of the American people and Government earnest appreciation of sympathy cabled by Vice-President Zanartu.

Hay.

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