European Commerce: Or, Complete Mercantile Guide to the Continent of Europe; Comprising an Account of the Trade of All the Principal Cities of the Continent, Copious Tables of Their Monies, Exchanges, Weights, and Measures, with Their Proportion to Those of England, the Local Regulations of Each Place, Their Tariffs of Duties, Methods of Buying and Selling, Tares and Other Allowances; Together with Numerous Official Documents, Ordinances, Etc., Forming a Complete Code of Commercial Information : to which is Added an Appendix, Containing Several Important Commercial Laws, and the Tariff of Duties, as Regulated by the Congress of the United States

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Baldwin, Cradock, and Joy, 1818 - Commerce - 691 pages
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Page 615 - ... are practised towards the most favoured nations. They shall be entitled to occupy dwellings and warehouses, and to dispose of their personal property of every kind and description by sale, gift, exchange, or will, and in any other way whatever, without the smallest loss or hindrance being given them on that head. They shall not be obliged to pay, under any pretence whatever, other taxes or rates than those which are paid, or than hereafter may be paid, by the most favoured nations in the dominions...
Page 615 - Majesty, subject to the same precautions of police, which are practised towards the most favoured nations. They shall be entitled to occupy dwellings and warehouses, and to dispose of their personal property of every kind and description, by sale, gift, exchange, or will, and in any other way whatever, without the smallest loss or hindrance being given them on that head.
Page 618 - The present separate and additional article shall have the same force and validity as if it had been inserted, word for word, in the convention of this day— it shall be ratified, and the ratification thereof shall be exchanged at the same time. In witness whereof, the respective plenipotentiaries have signed it, and have thereunto affixed the seal of their arms.
Page 616 - L. sentence of the competent tribunals. His Sicilian Majesty engages on all these occasions to guarantee to the subjects of his Britannic Majesty who shall reside in his states and dominions, the preservation of their property and personal security, in the same manner as those are guaranteed to his su-bjects, and to all foreigners belonging to the most favoured and most highly privileged nations.
Page 617 - Majesty has promised in the seventh article of the convention, signed this day between his Britannic Majesty and his Sicilian Majesty, it is declared by this present separate and additional article, that by the concession of ten per cent, of diminution, it is understood that in case the amount of the duty should be twenty per cent, upon the value of the merchandize, the effect of the reduction of ten per cent, is to reduce the duty from twenty to eighteen; and so for other cases in proportion. And...
Page 615 - Majesty engages that they shall have a free and undoubted right to travel and to reside in the territories and dominions of His said Majesty, subject to the same precautions of police which are practised towards the subjects or citizens of the most favoured nations.
Page 637 - ... cup, of the acorn, the better. It is of a bright drab colour, which it preserves so long as it is kept dry ; and dampness injures it, as it then turns black, and loses both its strength and value. It is principally used by tanners, and is always in demand. Though a very bulky article, it is uniformly bought and sold by weight. A ship can only take a small proportion of her register tonnage of valonia; so that its freight per ton is always high.
Page 615 - Art. 5. With respect to the personal privileges to be enjoyed by the subjects of his Britannic Majesty, in the kingdom of the Two Sicilies, his Sicilian Majesty promises that they shall have a free and undoubted right to travel, and to reside in the territories and dominions of his said Majesty, subject to the same precautions of police which are practised towards the most favoured nations.
Page 616 - ... of January 1816, upon the total of the merchandize or productions of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, her Colonies, Possessions, and Dependencies, imported into the States of His said Sicilian Majesty, according to the tenor of Article 4.
Page 614 - King of the Two Sicilies promises, that British commerce in general, and the British subjects who carry it on, shall be treated throughout his dominions upon the same footing as the most favoured nations, not only with respect to the persons and property of the said British subjects, but also with regard to every species of article in which they may traffic...

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