Seamanship: Comp. from Various Authorities, and Illustrated with Numerous Original and Select Designs, for the Use of the United States Naval Academy

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D. Van Nostrand, 1866 - Navigation - 663 pages
 

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Page 363 - ... so constructed as to show an unbroken light over an arc of the horizon of twenty points of the compass, so fixed as to throw the light ten points on each side of the vessel, namely, from right ahead to two points abaft the beam on either side, and of such a character as to be visible at a distance of at least five miles.
Page 361 - The friction must be continued under the blanket or over the dry clothing. Promote the warmth of the body by the application of hot flannels, bottles, or bladders of hot water, heated bricks, &c., to the pit of the stomach, the arm-pits, between the thighs, and to the soles of the feet.
Page 363 - ... from right ahead to two points abaft the beam on the port side, and of such a character as to be visible at a distance of at least two miles.
Page 508 - Whether clear or cloudy, a rosy sky at sunset presages fine weather ; a red sky in the morning bad weather, or much wind (perhaps rain) ; a grey sky in the morning, fine weather ; a high dawn, wind ; a low dawn, fair weather.
Page 363 - ... lantern so constructed and fixed as to show a white light from right ahead to two points on each bow, and a green light and a red light over an arc of the horizon from two points on each bow to two points abaft the beam on the starboard and port sides, respectively...
Page 364 - Fairways, shall exhibit, where it can best be seen, but at a Height not exceeding Twenty Feet above the Hull, a White Light in a globular Lantern of Eight Inches in Diameter, and so constructed as to show a clear uniform and unbroken Light visible all round the Horizon, and at a distance of at least One Mile.
Page 363 - ... uniform and unbroken light over an arc of the horizon of 20 points of the compass, so fixed as to throw the light 10 points on each side of the ship, viz., from right ahead to two points abaft the beam on either side...
Page 352 - If rowing to shore with the stern to seaward, by backing all the oars on the approach of a heavy sea, and rowing ahead again as soon as it has passed to the bow of the boat, thus rowing in on the back of the wave; or, as is...
Page 351 - If more speed can be given to a boat than is sufficient to prevent her being carried back by a surf, her way may be checked on its approach, which will give her an easier passage over it.
Page 364 - All vessels, whether steam- vessels or sail- vessels, when at anchor in roadsteads or fairways, shall, between sunset and sunrise, exhibit where it can best be seen, but at a height not exceeding twenty feet above the hull, a white light in a globular lantern of eight inches in diameter, and so constructed as to show a clear, uniform, and unbroken light, visible all around the horizon, and at a distance of at least one mile.

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