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URUGUAY

No. 198.

TREATY OF FRIENDSHIP, COMMERCE, AND NAVIGATION BETWEEN

GREAT BRITAIN AND URUGUAY.

Signed at Monte Video, November 13, 1885.*

[Ratifications exchanged at Monte Video, May 22, 1886.] Her Majesty the Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, and his Excellency the President of the Oriental Republic of the Uruguay, being desirous of maintaining and strengthening friendly relations, and of promoting commercial intercourse between the dominions of Her Britannic Majesty and the territories of the Republic, have resolved to conclude a Treaty of Friendship, Commerce, and Navigation, and have named as their Plenipotentiaries, that is to say:

Her Majesty the Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, William Gifford Palgrave, Esq., Minister Resident in the Oriental Republic of the Uruguay ;

And his Excellency the President of the Oriental Republic of the Uruguay, his Excellency Dr. Manuel Herrera y Obes, his

, Minister and Secretary of State for the Department of Foreign Affairs ;

Who, after having communicated to each other their respective full powers, found in good and due form, have agreed upon and concluded the following Articles :

ARTICLE I.

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Commerce and Navigation.-Most-favoured-nation Treatment.

The High Contracting Parties agree that, in all matters relating to commerce and navigation, any privilege, favour, or immunity whatever which either contracting Party has actually granted, or may hereafter grant, to the subjects or citizens of any other State shall be extended immediately and unconditionally to the subjects or citizens of the other Contracting Party; it being their intention that the trade and navigation of each country shall be placed, in all respects, by the other on the footing of the most favoured nation.

* Signed also in Spanish,

ARTICLE II.

Imports and Exports.Most-favoured-nation Treatment. The produce and manufactures of, as well as all goods coming from, the dominions and possessions of Her Britannic Majesty, which are imported into Uruguay, and the produce and manufactures of, as well as all goods coming from, Uruguay, which are imported into the dominions and possessions of Her Britannic Majesty, whether intended for consumption, warehousing, re-exportation, or transit, shall be treated in the same manner as, and, in particular, shall be subjected to no higher or other duties, whether general, municipal, or local, than the produce, manufactures, and goods of any third country the most favoured in this respect. No other or higher duties shall be levied in Uruguay on the exportation of any goods to the dominions and possessions of Her Britannic Majesty, or in the dominions and possessions of Her Britannic Majesty, on the exportation of any goods to Uruguay, than may be levied on the exportation of the like goods to any third country the most favoured in this respect.

Prohibitions of Importation, Exportation, or Transit.Most-favoured

nation Treatment. Neither of the Contracting Parties shall establish a prohibition of importation, exportation, or transit against the other which shall not, under like circumstances, be applicable to any third country the most favoured in this respect. Local Dues, Cųstoms Formalities, Brokerage, Commercial Travellers

Patterns, &c., Trade.- Most-faroured-nation Treatment. In like manner, in all that relates to local dues, Customs formalities, brokerage, patterns or samples introduced by commercial travellers, and all other matters connected with trade, British subjects in Uruguay, and Uruguayan citizens in the dominions and possessions of Her Britannic Majesty, shall enjoy most-favoured. nation treatment.

Notice to be given of changes in Uruguayan Laws, &c. In the event of any changes being made in Uruguayan laws Customs Tariff, or Regulations, sufficient notice shall be given in order to enable British subjects to make the necessary arrangements for meeting them.

ARTICLE III.

Vessels canul Cargoes.-National and Most-furoureil-nation Treatment.

British ships and their cargoes shall, in Uruguay, and Uruguayan vessels and their cargoes shall, in the dominions and possessions of Her Britannic Majesty, from whatever place arriving, and whatever may be the place of origin or destination of their cargoes, be treated in every respect as national ships and their cargoes. Harbour and other Dues.Pilotage.-- National and Most.favoured

nation Treatment. The preceding stipulation applies to local treatment dues, and charges in the ports, basins, docks, roadsteads, harbours, and rivers of the two countries, pilotage, and generally to all matters connected with navigation.

Every favour or exemption in these respects, or any other privilege in matters of navigation which either of the Contracting Parties shall grant to a third Power, shall be extended immediately and unconditionally to the other Party.

National Vessels. All vessels which, according to British law, are to be deemed British vessels, and all vessels which, according to the law of Uruguay are to be deemed Uruguayan vessels, shall, for the purpose of this Treaty, be respectively deemed British or Uruguayan vessels.

Coasting Trade Excepted. The coasting trade is excepted from the stipulations of the present Treaty, and remains subject to the respective laws of the two countries.

ARTICLE IV. Freedom of Residence.-Hiring, Sc., of Houses and Warehouses.

Acquisition and Disposal of Property.National Treatment.

The subjects or citizens of each of the Contracting Parties shall be permitted to reside permanently or temporarily in the dominions or possessions of the other, and to occupy and hire houses and warehouses for purposes of commerce, whether wholesale or retail. They shall also be at full liberty to exercise civil rights, and therefore to acquire, possess, and dispose of every description of property, movable and immovable. They may acquire and transmit the same to others, whether by purchase, sale, donation, exchange, marriage, testament, succession ab intestato, and in any other manner, under the same conditions as natives of the country. Their heirs and legal representatives may succeed to and take possession of it, either in person or by procurators, in the same manner and in the same legal forms as natives of the country.

Property.— lases, Imposts, 9c:- Vational Treatment, In none of these respects shall they pay upon the value of such property any other or higher impost, duty, or charge than is payable by natives of the country. In every case the subjects or citizens of the Contracting Parties shall be permitted to export their property, or the proceeds thereof if sold, freely and without being subjected on such exportation to pay any duty different from that to which natives of the country are liable under similar circumstances.

ARTICLE V. Domiciliary Visits.--National Treatment. The dwellings, manufactories, warehouses, and shops of the subjects or citizens of each of the Contracting Parties in the dominion and possessions of the other, and all premises appertaining thereto destined for purposes of residence or commerce, shall be respected Except under the conditions and with the forms prescribed by the laws for natives of the country, such dwellings and premises shall be exempt from search or domiciliary visit, and books, papers, or accounts shall be exempt from examination or inspection.

Administration of Justice.—National Treatment. The subjects or citizens of each of the two Contracting Parties in the dominions and possessions of the other shall have free access to the Courts of Justice for the prosecution and defence of their rights, without other conditions, restrictions, or taxes beyond those imposed on natives of the country, and shall, like them, be at liberty to employ, in all causes, their advocates, attorneys, or agents from among the persons admitted to the exercise of those professions according to the laws of the country.

ARTICLE VI.

Exemption from Military Service, Forced Loans, &c. The subjects or citizens of each of the Contracting Parties in the dominions and possession of the other shall be exempted from billeting and from all compulsory military service whatever, whether in the army, navy, or national guard or militia. They shall likewise be exempted from all contributions, whether pecuniary or in kind, imposed as a compensation for billeting and for personal service, and finally from forced Loans and military exactions or requisitions of

any kind.

ARTICLE VII.

Protection of Persons and Property.-National Treatment.

The subjects or citizens of either of the two Contracting Parties residing in the dominions and possessions of the other shall enjoy, in regard to their houses, persons, and properties, the protection of the Government in as full and ample a manner as native subjects or citizens.

Liberty of Conscience.Burials. In like manner the subjects or citizens of each Contracting Party shall enjoy in the dominions and possessions of the other full liberty of conscience, and shall not be molested on account of their religious belief; and such of those subjects or citizens as may die in the territories of the other party shall be buried in the public cemeteries, or in places appointed for the purpose, with suitable decorum and respect.

Freedom of Religious Worship. The subjects of Her Britannic Majesty residing within the territories of the Oriental Republic of the Uruguay shall be at liberty to exercise in private and in their own dwellings, or within the dwellings or offices of Her Britannic Majesty's Minister, Consuls, or ViceConsuls, or in any public edifice set apart for the purpose, their religious rites, services, and worship, and to assemble therein for that purpose without hindrance or molestation.

The same stipulations shall be observed in regard to the citizens of the Oriental Republic of the Uruguay within the territories of Her Britannic Majesty.

ARTICLE VIII. Trade-marks, &c.-National and Most-favoured-nation Treatment.

The subjects or citizens of each of the Contracting Parties shall have, in the dominions and possessions of the other, the same right as natives, or as subjects or citizens of the most favoured nation, in regard to patents for inventions, trade-marks, and designs, and the protection of industrial property upon fulfilment of the formalities prescribed by law.

ARTICLE IX. Appointment and Privileges of Consular Officers.--Most-favoured

nation Treatment. Each of the Contracting Parties may appoint Consuls-General, Consuls, Vice-Consuls, Pro-Consuls, and Consular Agents to reside respectively in towns or ports in the dominions and possessions of the other Power. Such Consular officers, however, shall not enter upon their functions until after they shall have been approved and admitted in the usual form by the Government to which they are sent. They shall exercise whatever functions, and enjoy whatever privileges exemptions, and immunities are, or may hereafter be, granted there to Consular officers of the most favoured nation.

ARTICLE X.

Intestate Estates.

In the event of any subject or citizen of either of the two Contracting Parties dying without will or testimony in the dominions

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