A Digest of International Law: As Embodied in Diplomatic Discussions, Treaties and Other International Agreements, International Awards, the Decisions of Municipal Courts, and the Writings of Jurists ...

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U.S. Government Printing Office, 1906 - International law
 

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Page 321 - be incorporated in the Union of the United States, and admitted as soon as possible, according to the principles of the Federal Constitution, to the enjoyment of all the rights, advantages and immunities of citizens of the United States.'' By this stipulation, citizenship of the United States was conferred on the inhabitants of the territory.
Page 225 - was now in a position to inform him officially of our views. "-Mr. Hay had suggested that in Article III., Rule 1, we should substitute for the words ' the canal shall be free and open to the vessels of commerce .and of war of all nations which shall agree to observe these Rules,
Page 305 - Congress having declared by resolution that the people of the island of Cuba " are and of right ought to be free and independent," and the status of the island in this regard not having been changed by the treaty with Spain of December 10, 1898, a citizen of Cuba is a citizen of a foreign state,
Page 243 - 1803, for the cession of Louisiana it is provided that 'the inhabitants of the ceded territory shall be incorporated in the Union of the United States, and admitted as soon as possible, according to the principles of the Federal Constitution, to the enjoyment of all the rights,
Page 327 - incorporated into the Union of the United States, and be admitted at the proper time (to be judged of by the Congress of the United States) to the enjoyment of all the rights of citizens of the United States according to the principles of the Constitution.
Page 539 - all children" born or hereafter born out of the limits and jurisdiction of the United States, whose fathers were or may be, at the time of their birth, citizens thereof, are to be declared * to be citizens of the United States; but
Page 342 - fide his intention to Income a citizen of the United States, and to renounce forever all allegiance and fidelity to any foreign prince, potentate, state, or sovereignty, and, particularly, by name, to the prince, potentate, state, or sovereignty of which the alien may be at the time a citizen or subject.
Page 294 - all children heretofore or hereafter born out of the limits and jurisdiction of the United States whose fathers were or may be at the time of their birth citizens thereof are declared to be citizens of the United States; but the rights of citizenship shall not descend to children whose fathers have never resided in the United States,
Page 599 - The declaration in the act of July 27. 1868, that the right of expatriation is "a natural and inherent right of all people," applies to citizens of the United States who seek to exercise it as well as to those of other countries.
Page 132 - may be constructed between the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans by the way of the river San Juan de Nicaragua, and either or both of the lakes of Nicaragua or Managua, to any port or place on the Pacific Ocean." By Article I. of the treaty it was provided as follows: "The Governments of the United