A Practical Treatise on Petroleum: Comprising Its Origin, Geology, Geographical Distribution, History, Chemistry, Mining, Technology, Uses and Transportation. Together with a Description of Gas Wells, the Application of Gas as Fuel, Etc

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Contents

Its use by the Central Pacific Railroad Company Manner of using
64
Spanish monopoly of petroleum pitch Facts reported by A
70
Its discovery on the border of the Rhine in 1735 by Dr Antoine LeBell
75
Oil lands of Japan Geological survey of the same
82
Statement of Jonas Hanway 1754 Russian use of petroleum for medi
88
Edward Stack on the output of the naphtha springs at Baku 1881
94
Naphtha well at Balakhani Naphtha yield of the great well Thorn
95
Owner of the fountain bankrupted by its copiousness Value of its daily
101
Excessive supply rendering the oil almost without price Capping of
107
Annual output of lubricating oils by Nobel Bros Russian liquid fuel
113
Conferences held at Baku between government delegates and the petro
119
CHAPTER V
125
Distillation of Seneca oil
131
Prof B Silliman Jr observations on the distillation of petroleum
137
History of Pithole City Pa
144
Table showing the yearly and the total production of the several oil dis
155
Table of the average daily runs in the petroleum regions for 18821886
162
Great variety of tools Construction of the carpenters rig illus
177
Four principal drilling tools
185
Operation of the regular drilling
191
Torpedoes Their invention 1862 usefulness and method of employ
197
CHAPTER VIII
203
Chemical analysis of natural gas
209
Table showing the properties of the chief gaseous elements of natural
215
Results of a number of average tests to discover the most efficient
221
Gas companies chartered in Pennsylvania up to February 5 1885 Great
227
Natural gas industry at Pittsburgh
233
Early date of the distillation of mineral oil for illuminating purposes 1694
239
Diagram showing arrangements for distributing distillates employed
245
Receiving crude oil Pipes and tanks in use
246
Vacuum stills
252
Petroleum in Alsace
307
Grading of oil by the West Virginia Transportation Company
310
Spindle oils Division of the distillates of residuum
316
Table of the specific gravities and flashing points of the products of dis
323
Apparatus worked by hand for mixing crude photogen illustrated
328
Manufacture of lubricating oil from Baku naphtha 834
334
Chemical purification of the lubricating oil
341
Tagliabues open tester illustrated and described
348
The Parrish Naphthometer illustrated and described
354
Table for converting Baumé markings into true specific gravities
360
The composition of oils and their freedom from admixture with other oils
369
The degree of cold to which oil may be exposed without the deposition
375
Analysis of cosmoline by J Moss Vaseline value for pharmaceutical
381
CHAPTER XII
387
Methods of using petroleum for illumination as a torch oil
391
Hitchcock tablelamp illustrated and described
397
Report of three National Commissions on the use of petroleum as a fuel
403
Percentage composition of bituminous and of anthracite coal and
409
Prof Peckhams report on the steamproducing power of petroleum
416
Petroleum stoves and furnaces for domestic purposes and the arts
422
Petroleum refuseComparative trials with petroleum anthracite bitumi
428
Brayton hydrocarbon engine
434
Tidewater Pipeline Limited
450
Pittsburgh Pipelines
452
THE GEOLOGY OF NATURAL GAS BRIEFLY STATED BY CHARLES
467
Testing the viscosity by means of the inclined plane W H Baileys
482
164
488
448
495
THE CHEMISTRY OF PETROLEUM
499
Copyright

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Page 387 - It has been said that he who makes two blades of grass grow where only one grew before is a benefactor to his species.
Page 102 - Some idea of the mass of matter thrown up from the well could be formed by a glance at the damage done on the south side in twenty-four hours — a vast shoal of sand having been formed which had buried to the roof some magazines and shops, and had blocked to the height of six or seven feet all the neighboring derricks within a distance of 50 yards.
Page iii - CREW. — A Practical Treatise on Petroleum : Comprising its Origin, Geology, Geographical Distribution, History, Chemistry, Mining, Technology, Uses and Transportation. Together with a Description of Gas Wells, the Application of Gas as Fuel, etc. By BENJAMIN J. CREW. With an Appendix on the Product and Exhaustion of the Oil Regions, and the Geology of Natural Gas in Pennsylvania and New York. By CHARLES A. ASHBURNER, MS.
Page 87 - Georgiania there is a fountain from which oil springs in great abundance, insomuch that a hundred shiploads might be taken from it at one time. This oil is not good to use with food, but 'tis good to burn, and is also used to anoint camels that have the mange.
Page 461 - The general conditions upon which the occurrence of natural gas seems to depend, from a consideration of the facts at present at our command, are: (a) the porosity and homogeneousness of the sandstone which serves as a reservoir to hold the gas ; (b) the extent to which the strata above or below the gas-sand are cracked ; (c) the dip of the gas-sand and the position of the anticlines and synclines...
Page 101 - ... with a roar in its upward course, and which served in a measure to check its velocity. The derrick itself was 70 feet high, and the oil and the sand, after bursting through the roof and sides, flowed fully three times higher, forming a greyish-black fountain, the column clearly defined on the southern side, but merging into a cloud of spray thirty yards broad on the other.
Page 101 - IN America there are over 25,000 drilled petroleum wells. Baku possesses 400. But a single one of those 400 wells has thrown up as much oil in a day as nearly the whole of the 25,000 in America put together. This is very wonderful, but a more striking fact is, that the copiousness of the well should have ruined its owners, and broken the heart of the engineer who bored it, after having yielded enough oil in four months to have realised in America at least one million sterling.
Page 129 - They collect the petroleum by skimming it, like cream from a milk-pan. For this purpose they use a broad flat board, made thin at one edge like a knife ; it is moved flat upon, and just under the surface of, the water, and is soon covered by a thin coating of the petroleum, which is so thick and adhesive that it does not fall off, but is removed by scraping the instrument on the lip of a cup.
Page 101 - ... a greyish-black fountain, the column clearly defined on the southern side, but merging into a cloud of spray thirty yards broad on the other. A strong southerly wind enabled us to approach within a few yards of the crater on the former side, and to look down into the sandy basin formed round about the bottom of the derrick, where the oil was bubbling and seething round the stalk of the oil-shoot like a geyser.
Page 128 - Its geological character is the same with that which is known to prevail in this western region; a silicious sandstone, with shale, and in some places limestone is the immediate basis of the country. The sandstone and shale (the limestone I did not see) lie in nearly horizontal strata. The sandstone is usually of a light gray color, and both it and the shale abound with entrocites, encrinites, corallines, terebratula, and other religuae, characteristic of the secondary transition formation.

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