Research Report, Issues 46-50

Front Cover
National Industrial Conference Board, 1922 - Economics
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Page 22 - ... protection of the interests of workers when employed in countries other than their own...
Page 42 - Industries in which articles are manufactured, altered, cleaned, repaired, ornamented, finished, adapted for sale, broken up or demolished, or in which materials are transformed; including shipbuilding, and the generation, transformation, and transmission of electricity or motive power of any kind.
Page 32 - Among these methods and principles, the following seem to the High Contracting Parties to be of special and urgent importance: First. The guid.ing principle above enunciated that labour should not be regarded merely as a commodity or article of commerce.
Page 124 - In framing any recommendation or draft convention of general application the Conference shall have due regard to those countries in which climatic conditions, the imperfect development of industrial organisation or other special circumstances make the industrial conditions substantially different and shall suggest the modifications, if any, which it considers may be required to meet the case of such countries.
Page 25 - Office shall include the collection and distribution of information on all subjects relating to the international adjustment of conditions of industrial life and labour, and particularly the examination of subjects which it is proposed to bring before the Conference with a view to the conclusion of international conventions, and the conduct of such special investigations as may be ordered by the Conference.
Page 156 - It is adjudged and awarded that no person shall be refused employment or in any way discriminated against on account of membership or non-membership in any labor organization, and that there shall be no discrimination against or interference with any employee who is not a member of any labor organization by members of such organization.
Page 123 - They recognise that differences of climate, habits and customs, of economic opportunity and industrial tradition, make strict uniformity in the conditions of labor difficult of immediate attainment.
Page 33 - The standard set by law in each country with respect to the conditions of labour should have due regard to the equitable economic treatment of all workers lawfully resident therein.
Page 32 - The payment to the employed of a wage adequate to maintain a reasonable standard of life as this is understood in their time and country. Fourth. — The adoption of an eight hours day or a forty-eight hours week as the standard to be aimed at where it has not already been attained.
Page 22 - ... the regulation of the hours of Work, including the establishment of a maximum working day and week, the regulation of the labour supply, the prevention of unemployment, the provision of an adequate living wage, the protection of the worker against sickness, disease and injury arising out of his employment...

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