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THE BIBLE-WOMEN NURSES. Our second and Branch Mission of Bible-women Nurses, now completes its fifth year of alliance with the first and original Mission of Bible-women. We commence with its Financial Report : STATEMENT OF RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURE OF MOTHERHOUSE AND BIBLE-WOMEN NURSES, FOR THE

YEAR ENDING Oct. 16TH, 1872.

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July

158 7 6477 2 617 9 8 6 17 2 166 16 4 46 14 2 714 19 10

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Oct.

459 16 2 550 0 0 18 5 1 0 14 0106 13 0 32 1 6 707 137

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It will interest those who make a similar movement elsewhere, to observe the annual growth of this BIBLE-WOMAN NURSE Mission.

VOL. VIII.-10. 12.

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STATEMENT OF RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURE OF MOTHER-HOUSE

AND BIBLE-WOMEN NURSES, FROM APRIL, 1868, to OCTOBER 16TH, 1872.

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We have trained with our Bible-women and in Hospital 17 new Nurses this

year. The additional Districts areGray’s-inn-road, Upper Thames-street, Drury-lane, City-road, Poplar, Millwall, Bethnal-green, Chislehurst, New-cut, Westminster, Wandsworth, Notting-hill, Kensington, Haverstock-hill.

The districts in which our Nurses are at present working are as follows:

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In 1868,

were

1869, 1870, 1871, 1872,

visited

99 sick persons, to whom were paid 5,000 visits. ditto 783

ditto

27,690 ditto. ditto 2,110

ditto

69,009 ditto. ditto 2,695

ditto

87,718 ditto. ditto 2,985

ditto

97,279 ditto.

Out of the number visited there were this year 313 deaths, the rest were either cured or are still on the list. The cure as often half consisted in small supplies of suitable nourishment and warm clothing—which the patient had no other means of obtaining, as well as in those appliances for cleanliness and comfort in the hours of helplessness to which the city poor are sad strangers.

The aid administered in food to the sick this year has been at the cost of 3131., and has consisted in meat, milk, and farinaceous varieties usually cooked by the Nurse and taken by her to the patient. Wine has cost us in the year, 51. 8s. ld. ; medicines, 35l. 13s. Medical comforts, too, are a necessity-bed-rests, air-cushions, &c. Carbolic soap has cost 15l. 4s. ; and carbolic fluid, 271. 5s. ; India-rubber sheeting, 171. 10s.; and lint about 501. Total of above, with other details, 5451. 138. Donation of such articles by large producers of them would be invaluable to us, and most carefully applied.

We owe much to the MEDICAL LADY SUPERINTENDENT, whose services we are so happy as to retain for the now large staff of our Nurses. She has a true heart of sympathy for the sickness and distress with which they bring her acquainted, and is very skilful in instructing them in their duties of ministration to its relief. When any doctor is in attendance, they follow out his directions, but “No doctor,” and “ No nurse,” is more commonly the state of things where we visit. Our Nurses meet our Medical lady fortnightly, in regular divisions, at the “ MOTHER House," and she verifies their statements and requests, which have been sent by the post on a printed form a day or two previously, to our trusty House and Store-keeper; and are therefore ready prepared for each applicant Nurse on her arrival.

A kind Lady helper presides over this division of supplies, and makes a tabulated record of it. Thus all is peaceably accomplished, and when our shelves of supply are nearly emptied one week, it is marvellous to see how much will gather there again to meet the wants of the next week—frequently, as we have noticed, the very things that will be needed, and doubtless have been prayed for, and are sent from far off quarters in answer to

the prayer.

We should be glad of skilled superintendence for our Nurses of a voluntary kind, but it is difficult to secure.

Should our numbers increase, as seems probable, we shall need an increased staff of Nurse Pioneers, who can visit all their cases with three or four Nurses a week, this help being found such a valuable supplement to voluntary effort in the original work of the Bible-women.

We commence our New Year with about 4007. in this department, which will scarcely suffice for the onward work of two current months, but we feel certain " the Lord will provide."

SUNSHINE IN DARK PLACES.

A REPORT FROM THE MEDICAL SUPERINTENDENT OF

OUR NURSES.

“It is a pleasant sight to see Nurse W— with her cwn people; she is so gentle and nice in her manner, so cheerful and bright that she is like the sunshine when she goes into the room."

The readers of “The Missing Link" may like to know the circumstances and surroundings of some of these patients.

Mrs. V-,-"I used to be in a sad way before nurse came; could not wash myself, so never was clean. Now I am always able to feel so. She is sure to come and help me. Nobody can tell what a blessing she is, and she is so good-tempered and so cheerful that she is like an angel coming into the house. She makes my bed, and in many ways is most useful.”

Since March, 1871, Mrs. V-- has been partially paralysed ; there was no use in the lower limbs ; at first the arms were much affected, but latterly there has been so much improvement that she can manage to slip on her clothes.

Mrs. D--, Oct., 1871.--"I'm in pain night and day. Never no rest. I'm waiting for my Lord to call me to His rest. Lately I have been very ill, I thought I should die, and I was so thankful. I can't tell all that was in my thoughts. When I want to express my feelings I can't, but God knows what is in my heart.” She was toasting a bit of crust for her dinner, and had a cup of weak tea without milk to drink with it. After her rent is paid, she has only sixpence a week to live upon,“ but God does not let me be very hungry.”

Visited, June 28, 1872, Mrs. D—-; is much more feeble. The left side has been paralysed, so that she is almost helpless. The ulcer on the right leg is deeper ; close to the bone it is a large round hole, into which a small egg could be placed ; the whole leg from ankle to knee is much inflamed, but amidst all her suffering, she says, “I'm able to bless God for it. He does help me and makes me glad in His love; but oh, I shall praise Him when He calls me away. Momentarily I pray to the Lord Jesus.”

“Nobody can wash me so comfortably as Nurse ; she never hurts, and I do feel so clean and tidy afterwards."

Three weeks ago Mrs. Dowling had a fit, and was unconscious for a time; has been worse since then, “but,” she says, “I can still read, and my books speak of my blessed Saviour, so that I am always comforted by them and by Nurse."

Annie N- a child of 11, who, when 2 years old, had a fall. Several months after it was found that the spine had been injured, and was seriously diseased. Near two years ago abscesses formed on the hips, and from that time she has been unable to sit up. She is an intelligent-looking child, but has not been taught to read ; is fond of looking at pictures, and will cut figures in paper from any plates she may see. A transparent-slate was afterwards sent to her, which has given much pleasure.

In June, 1871, she was sent to a workhouse infirmary, the parents hoping that country air and a better diet than they could give would benefit her. She remained eleven weeks, when Mrs. N-- fetched her away, for she was sinking for want of care and nourishment. Every morning at six she was roused from sleep and told to get up, which she did, and spent the day crawling about on the floor. The food was rough and coarse, often dry bread only, and no one noticed whether the child ate or not. Milk was never ordered for her ; wine and beef-tea were, but the nurses drank them.

Since her return home she has improved greatly. At the suggestion of Nurse she was taught to crochet. The father is a maker of children's shoes, is often short of work, and has delicate health ; is threatened with consumption. There are four younger children. Both parents expressed their gratitude for Nurse. The abscesses are less painful since she has attended to them, and her daily visits brighten the child's life.

March 1, 1872.-Find much improvement in the home since Nurse has visited; more cleanliness, a greater variety of food, and the money which Aunie has earned by her crotchet work—the chief part of which Nurse has sold for her-has been expended in buying towels, sheets, and a washing bason for Annie's personal use.

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