Life in Poetry: Law in Taste: Two Series of Lectures Delivered in Oxford, 1895-1900

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Macmillan and Company, limited, 1901 - Aesthetics - 452 pages

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Page 407 - Perplext in faith, but pure in deeds, At last he beat his music out. — • There lives more faith in honest doubt, Believe me, than in half the creeds.
Page 353 - Purples the east: still govern thou my song, Urania, and fit audience find, though few. But drive far off the barbarous dissonance Of Bacchus and his revellers, the race Of that wild rout that tore the Thracian bard In Rhodope, where woods and rocks had ears To rapture, till the savage clamour drown'd Both harp and voice; nor could the muse defend Her son.
Page 401 - I live not in myself, but I become Portion of that around me; and to me, High mountains are a feeling, but the hum Of human cities torture...
Page 360 - First follow Nature, and your judgment frame By her just standard, which is still the same: Unerring Nature, still divinely bright, One clear, unchanged, and universal light, Life, force, and beauty, must to all impart, At once the source, and end, and test of Art. Art from that fund each just supply provides; Works without show, and without pomp presides: In some fair body thus th...
Page 54 - Like Cato, give his little senate laws, And sit attentive to his own applause ; 210 While wits and templars every sentence raise, And wonder with a foolish face of praise — Who but must laugh, if such a man there be ? Who would not weep, if Atticus were he...
Page 70 - Haec ubi dicta dedit, lacrimantem et multa volentem 790 dicere deseruit, tenuesque recessit in auras. Ter conatus ibi collo dare bracchia circum ; ter frustra comprensa manus effugit imago, par levibus ventis volucrique simillima somno.
Page 210 - And when the evening mist clothes the riverside with poetry, as with a veil, and the poor buildings lose themselves in the dim sky, and the tall chimneys become campanili, and the warehouses are palaces in the night, and the whole city hangs in the heavens, and fairy-land is before us...
Page 383 - Whose honours with increase of ages grow, As streams roll down, enlarging as they flow; Nations unborn your mighty names shall sound, And worlds applaud that must not yet be found!
Page 401 - Are not the mountains, waves, and skies, a part Of me and of my soul, as I of them ? Is not the love of these deep in my heart With a pure passion?
Page 405 - Cursed be the social wants that sin against the strength of youth! Cursed be the social lies that warp us from the living truth! Cursed be the sickly forms that err from honest Nature's rule! Cursed be the gold that gilds the straiten'd forehead of the fool!

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