Page images
PDF
EPUB
[ocr errors]

...

...

...

...

...

4. Proclamation of Martial Law in Hawaii, January 7, 1895

5. Order for a Military Commission, January 16, 1895

6. Mr. Thurston to Mr. Gresham, January 20, 1895; (Extract
from 53rd Congress, 3rd Session, Ex. Doc. 202, House of
Representatives)

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

11. Mr. Hawes to the Earl of Kimberley, April 4, 1895; (Enclosing
text of Acts 20, 22, 24 and 26 of the Hawaiian Government)

...

...

...

...

13. Mr. Hawes to Mr. Hatch, August 26, 1895; (Enclosing sworn
statements by various prisoners)

14. Mr. Hatch to Mr. Hawes, August 28, 1895

[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors]
[blocks in formation]
[blocks in formation]

25. Acting Consul-General Kenny to Mr. Cooper, August 1, 1898
26. Treaty between the United States and Hawaii, June 16, 1897
27. Lord Salisbury to Sir J. Pauncefote, September 9, 1898
28. Sir J. Pauncefote to Lord Salisbury, October 10, 1898;
(Enclosing Mr. Hay to Sir J. Pauncefote, October 7, 1898)
29. Mr. Tower to Lord Salisbury, May 3, 1899

...

[ocr errors]

30. Mr. Tower to Mr. Hay, October 28. 1899 ...
31. Mr. Tower to Lord Salisbury, October 31, 1899; (Enclosing
Mr. Hay to Mr. Tower, October 30, 1899)
32. Mr. Tower to Lord Salisbury, November 4, 1899; (Enclosing
Mr. Hay to Mr. Tower, November 3, 1899)
33. Lord Pauncefote to Lord Salisbury. September 14, 1900;
(Enclosing (1) Lord Pauncefote to Mr. Hay, August 14,
1900; (2) Mr. Hill to Lord Pauncefote, September 11, 1900)
34. Lord Pauncefote to Lord Lansdowne, December 21, 1900:
(Enclosing an extract from the report of the Governor of
Hawaii)
35. Lord Pauncefote to Lord Lansdowne. April 17, 1901; (Enclosing
(1) Lord Pauncefote to Mr. Hay, April 9, 1901; (2) Mr. Hay
to Lord Pauncefote, April 15, 1901)

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

36. Sir M. Herbert to Lord Lansdowne, February 18, 1903; (Enclosing Mr. Hay to Sir M. Herbert, February 17, 1903) 37. Sir M. Herbert to Lord Lansdowne, May 28. 1903; (Enclosing Consul Hoare to Sir M. Herbert, May 13, 1903)...

38. Sir M. Durand to Lord Lansdowne, June 17, 1904; (Enclosing Mr. Hay to Sir M. Durand, June 16, 1904)

...

[merged small][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors][subsumed][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

ANNEX 1.

(Extract from "U.S. Foreign Relations, 1894," App. II.

p. 1393.)

Mr. Willis to Mr. Gresham, January 11, 1895.
Legation of the United States,
(No. 81. Confidential.) Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands,
Sir,
January 11, 1895.

I HAVE this day forwarded, through United States. Dispatch Agent Cooper, the following telegram addressed to you :

――――

of

"At Waikiki Beach, 5 miles from executive building, night of the 6th January, uprising Hawaiians, reported several hundred well supplied with arms and ammunition, commanded by Captain. Nowlein and R. W. Wilcox. Hon. C. L. Carter, late commissioner, killed first night. Desultory fighting every day since, without further loss of life or property to Government. Three Royalists killed and fifty taken prisoners. Over fifty non-combatants, mostly white, arrested, including three ex-attorneysgeneral and many prominent citizens. Martial law declared the 7th January. No vessels allowed to leave. Other islands reported quiet. Crisis thought to be over, but excitement still intense. President Dole expressed to me his gratification that no national ship has been in port during this disturbance. Arms reported to have been brought from Vancouver by 'Norma.'

999

As reported to you in my No. 79 of January 5, there have been for several weeks rumours of revolt, many of which, as therein stated, I considered well founded. On the 6th instant the first actual encounter took place.

A squad of Government police (Hawaiian), accompanied by Deputy Marshal Brown, Hon. C. L. Carter, and several others, undertook a search for arms on the premises of a half-white. named Bartelmann, who resides on

commission which visited Washington in the spring of 1893, and has held many other responsible positions. His death seems to be universally regretted.

After more firing, the Royalists retreated to the crater of an extinct volcano (Diamond Head), from which they were the following day dislodged by the Government forces. They are to-day reported to be surrounded in the adjoining mountains, without supplies and reduced to thirty men.

On the morning of the 7th instant martial law was declared, since which probably sixty citizens have been arrested. Among them are three ex-attorneys-general and other prominent persons, representing various nationalities. Many of these arrests have been, as the Government officers state, "precautionary." I have the assurance of the attorney-general that the cases of United States. citizens under arrest will be promptly investigated and justly dealt with.

In the telegram supra I have quoted the remark of President Dole that he was gratified at the absence from port at this time of any national ship. It gave his Government, he said, an opportunity to prove its ability to take care of itself, which if once done would probably insure permanent peace. Similiar views, as I have heretofore reported, were expressed by Minister Hatch when the "Philadelphia" was about to depart.

The number of royalists under arms was not probably half as large as first reported; of foreigners (white) there are not half a dozen. Their leaders are well-known here. Nowlein is a half white, who at the time of the revolution in 1893 was commander-in-chief of the Queen's forces. Since then, he has been captain of a volunteer bodyguard to her. Wilcox is a half-cast Hawaiian, was educated at the Royal Artillery School in Turin, and there married a cousin of Prince Colonna. He was the leader of the revolution in 1889.

The feeling, indicated by the newspaper slips inclosed(4), is for extreme measures against all involved, but thus far nothing has been done.

With sentiments of high esteem,
I am, &c.

« PreviousContinue »