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tair Smith. At 10 A. M., went in pursuit of the Bowes, and at meridian spoke her. I have since learned from several vessels which I boarded from Pernambuco, that the man-of-war brig* was damaged very much, besides having her first Lieutenant and five men killed, and a number wounded. Among the latter was the Captain, who had his thigh shot off, and has since died of his wounds. The ship's masts scarcely lasted to carry her to Pernambuco ; her cargo was nearly all damaged ; she was dismantled, and obliged to get new top-sides. The brig was nearly in the same situation, the greater part of her cargo being damaged, and it was with difficulty they kept her from sinking, before they reached Pernambuco harbor.

Soon after the fight and capture of the three British vessels, the gallant Boyle fell in with, and took the Scotch ship Adelphi, belonging to Aberdeen. She was from Liverpool bound for Bahia, of 361 tons, mounting 8 long twelve-pounders, laden with salt and dry-goods; manned her, with orders to proceed to the United States. He was subsequently chased by the famous British frigate Surprise, which he casily out-sailed, and continued on his cruise down among the West India Islands.

On the 6th of Feb., at daylight, being off the Island of St. Johns, distant two leagues, he discovered two brigs to leeward, when he made all sail in chase of them; called all hands to quarters ; soon made out the nearest brig to be armed. At 6 A. M. she hoisted English colors,

* Some three or four months after Captain Boyle's engagement with this fleet, the Portuguese man-of-war brig here alluded to, arrived at Lisbon. The author of this book being there at the time, had the curiosity to examine her, in company with his friend Richard M. irwrence, Esq., of New York, and several other American gentlemer. We foujid her a very large vessel, with high bulwarks, a very formidable battery, :d to all appearance big enough to hoist the Comet on her decks.

fired a gun and then struck her flag; took possession of her. She proved to be the Alexis, of Greenock, from Demarara, loaded with sugar, rum, cotton, and coffee, mounting 10 guns ; sent Mr. Ball and six men on board, to take her to the United States, and then made sail after the other. At eight A. M., discovered a man-of-war brig upon the wind, standing to the S.E., apparently from St. Thomas; ascertained from the prisoners that they were a part of a convoy of nine sail from Demarara, bound for St. Thomas ; that the most of them had got in during the night, and that the man-of-war brig then in sight had convoyed them, and that she was called the Swaggerer. Åt 9 A.m. hoisted his colors, and prepared to give the brig he was then in chase of, a broadside, when she set English colors, and gave the Comet her whole broadside of great guns, which was instantly returned, when down came her colors. After she had struck they cut away her topsail and jib-haulyards, etc., etc., in addition to the damage the Comet had done by her shot, which was very considerable ; sent Mr. Cashell, first Lieutenant, and several men, on board, to repair the rigging as quick as possible ; took out most of the prisoners, and sent Mr. Gilpin, prizemaster, with seven men, to relieve Mr. Cashell ; the brig by this time had made sail and filled away in company with the Comet. The man-of-war by this time had gained very much upon them, he therefore thought it prudent to make no delay, but to order Mr. Cashell to make the best of his way through the passage between St. Johns and St. Thomas, as the only possible way of saving the prize brig from recapture. In the mean time Capt. Boyle, with the Comet, played about the man-of-war brig, to divert his attention until the prizes had time to make their escape. The last brig captured was the Dominica

packet, of Liverpool, from Demarara bound for St. Thomas, laden with rum, sugar, cotton, and coffee, mounting ten guns. Captain B. then hove to and gave the man-of-war brig time to approach the Comet, which he did to within long gun-shot; Capt. Boyle soon found! he could out-sail his opponent with ease, and was able to tantalise and perplex him, and in this way he detained him until his prizes had made their escape through the passage. He kept him in play in this inanner until noon, when he found Mr. C. had got through the passage. He had ordered him to steer to the northward, and decided he would follow him as soon as possible. He then made all sail upon the wind to go around to the windward of St. Johns, the Swaggerer in full chase. At two P. m. he had so out-sailed his adversary, that he was at least four miles to leeward. At this time he discovered a sail on the weather bow, and soon after made her out to be a schooner running before the wind. At 3 P. M., being near her, fired several muskets at her when she hove to. Put Mr. Wild, prize-master, and six men on board, took out the prisoners, and ordered him through the passage between Tortola and St. Johns, and from thence to the United States. She proved to be the schooner Jane, from Demarara for St. Thomas, loaded with rum, sugar, and coffee. The Swaggerer still in chase, though very far to leeward.

It appears that soon after the capture of these prizes, Capt. Boyle made the best of his way home, and returned safe to Baltimore after this successful cruise, on the 17th March, passing through the British blockading squadron, bidding defiance to their vigilance and nunbers.

Soon after the termination of this successful cruise, we find the ever-active and gallant Boyle again on the broad ocean in command of the elegant and formidable

privateer-brig Chasseur, always annoying the enemy, wherever he chanced to steer ; sometimes on the coasts of Spain and Portugal, and anon in the British and Irish Channels, carrying dismay and terror to British trade and commerce, in defiance of their fleetest frigates and sloops-of-war, who strove again and again to capture him, but were never able. He appeared frequently to tantalise and vex them, as if for mere sport, and at the same time convince them, that he could out-manoeuvre and out-sail them, in any trial of seamanship or skill.

It must have been a fine sight to see him handle his beautiful vessel, and to a nautical man, highly exciting, to have witnessed his famous escape in the British Channel, when nearly surrounded by two frigates and two brigs of war, as recorded in the tenth chapter of this work.

He received the fire of one of the frigates and skilfully hauled out from among them, and made good his retreat.

CHAPTER v.

CAPTAIN SHALER'S ESCAPE IN THE PRIVATEER GOVERNOR TOMPKINS FROM – BRITISH

FRIGATE--THE PRIVATEERS YANKEE AND BLOCKADE SAIL FROM NEW PORT ON THE 1ST OF JUXE, 1813-BRITISH POLICY OF TAKING NEW ORLEANS-SCHOONER FLYINGFISH TAKEN BY THE SAUCY JACK-BRITISH SHIP INDUSTRY SENT INTO BERGEN, NORWAY, BY THE TRUE-BLOODED YANKEES BRITISH SHIP LONDON PACKET CAPTURED BY THE ARGUS AND SENT INTO BOSTON-BRITISH PACKET MORGIANNA, CAPTURED BY BOARDING, BY TILE SARATOGA-FIFTEEN BRITISH VESSELS CAPTURED OFF JAMAICA, BY THE LOVELY CORDELIA, OF CHAR

- THE YANKEE PRIVATEER RETURNS TO RHODE ISLAND AFTER A SUCCESSFUL CRUISE-TABLE OF PRIVATEERS BELONGING TO SALEM-CAPTAIN STAFFORD'S FAMOUS DEFENCE OF THE PRIVATEER DOLPHIN-ARRIVAL OF THE PRIVATEER GRAMRUS AT NEW YORK NARROW ESCAPE OP TUIS VESSEL, WHILE CRUISING AMONG TIE CANARY ISLANDS-EULOGY ON CAPTAIN JOHN MURPHY--DESPERATE ENGAGEMENT BETWEEN THE PRIVATEUR (is)3E, CAPTAIN RICHARD MOON, WITH TWO ENGLISH BRIGS, OFF MADEIRA-BRITISH SIIP NEREID CAPTURED OFF MADEIRA BY TIIE GOVERXOR TOMPKINS--INTERESTING CRUISE OF THE FAMOUS CAPTAIN BOYLE IN TIIR SCHOONER COMET.

EXTRACT OF A LETTER FROM NATHANIEL SHALER, COMMANDER OF THE PRIVATE ARMED SCHOONER “GOVERNOR TOMPKINS," TO HIS AGENT IN NEW YORK.-DATED AT SEA, JAN. 1st, 1813.

Two days after dispatching the Nereid, I took a whaleman from London, bound for the South Seas, but as she was of no value, I took out such stores, etc., as I could stow, and being much lumbered with prisoners and baggage, I put them on board, and ordered her for Falmouth. The chasing of this ship had taken me some distance from my ground, and owing to calms, I could not regain it until the 25th ult., when at sunrise three ships were discovered ahead. We made all sail in chase. The wind being light, we came up with them slowly. On a nearer approach, they proved to be two ships and a brig. One of the ships had all the appearance of a large transport, and from their manoeuvres, seemed to have concerted measures for mutual defence. The large ship appeared

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