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The American seamen in this trial of strength, and in most other naval battles during the war, went into action dancing at their guns, and telling their officers, “ Gentlemen, you take care of the flags and the quarter-deck, and we will do the fighting.”

Captain Hull, finding his ship filled with prisoners, many of whom were suffering from their wounds, made sail for Boston, where he arrived on the 30th of the month, after a cruise of just twenty-eight days.

On his return to Boston, after his glorious victory, and destruction of the Guerriere, he was welcomed with hearttelt joy by all classes of people. An artillery company was posted on the wharf, and greeted him with a federal salute, which was returned by the Constitution.

An immense number of citizens received him with loud and unanimous huzzas in every part of the city. The principal streets were beautifully decorated with American flags, and men of all ranks and distinctions appeared to vie with each other to do him honor. A splendid entertainment was given by the inhabitants of Boston to Captain Hull and the brave officers belonging to his ship. The citizens of New York raised a sum of money for the purpose of purchasing swords, which were to be presented to him and his gallant officers. The people of Philadelphia also subscribed funds to purchase two superb pieces of plate to be given to the naval hero and his first Lieutenant, the gallant Morris. In Baltimore the flags of all the vessels in the harbor were displayed in honor of Captain Hull's victory over the Guerriere, and a grand salute fired. In fine, the whole country was electrified, and the nntire heart of the Nation beat high in his praise.

CHAPTER JI.

LIST OF FRIGATES FIT FOR SEA-FIRST BRITISH SHIP CAPTURED AND SENT INTO NORFOLK

-CAPTURE OF THE BRITISH GOVERNMENT SCHOONER WHITING-COMBAT BETWEEN THE LETTER-OF-MARQUE-SCHOONER FALCON AND THE BRITISH CUTTER AERO-SIXTY-FIVE PRIVATEERS AND LETTERS-OF-MARQUE AT SEA ON THE 16TH OF JULY, 1812-FOUR PRIVATEERS LEAVE THE CAPES OF THE DELAWARE ON THE 20TH OF JULY-PRIZES ARRIVING ALMOST DAILY IN THE ATLANTIC PORTS-SUCCESSFUL CRUISE OF THE PRIVATEER-SCHOONER FAME, OF SALEM-CAPTURE OF A BRITISH TRANSPORT BRIG, SENT INTO GLOUCESTER-ESCAPE OF THE PRIVATEER SLOOP POLLY FROM THE ENGLISH SLOOP-OF. WAR INDIAN-CAPTURE OF THE SHIP MARGARET BY THE PRIVATEER TEAZER-EXTRACT FROM À LONDON NEWSPAPER -BRITISH BRIG LEONIDAS SENT INTO SAVANNAH BY THE MARS-CAPTCRE OF THE BRITISH SHIP S. CLARK BY THE GLOBE, SENT INTO NORFOLKPRIVATEER JOHN RETURNS TO SALEM, AFTER A SUCCESSFUL CRUISE - COMMODORE BARNEY ARRIVES AT NEW PORT IN THE ROSSIE, ON THE 30TH OF AUGUST, AFTER A SUCCESSFUL CRUISE-A SEVERE FIGHT BETWEEN TIE PRIVATEER SHADOW AND BRITISH SHIP MARY BRITISH SHIP QUEBEC CAPTURED BY THE SARATOGA-CHASE OF THE PRIVATEER JACK'; FAVORITE BY HIS MAJESTY'S SCHOONER SUBTLE, AND THE LOSS OF THE LATTER.

When I commenced writing the history of the privateers and letters-of-marque, it was not my intention to enter deeply into the exploits and achievements of our gallant little navy, either on the broad ocean or on our extensive lakes, but merely to intersperse my book with a few of the most brilliant combats between single ships. But, as I advance, I find the two subjects so intimately connected, that it is with great difficulty I am able to proceed without giving a sketch, or short outline of the war.

In following up the chain of events from its commencement, it will be necessary to insert here a list of the American frigates, that were well-manned and efficient, when the war was declared, on the 18th of June, 1812.

Constitution,
President,
United States,
Congress,

44 Guns. Constellation,
44

Chesapeake,
44

Essex, 38

38 Guns
38
32

Beside the above seven frigates, there were sono twelve or fifteen sloops-of-war and smaller vessels, lying in the naval dockyards. Some of these ships were repairing, others unseaworthy, and not fit for present service. Consequently, it followed that the before-ramed seven frigates were left to contend with the whole British navy, amounting in number, at that period, to one thousand and sixty sail, eight hundred of which were efficient cruising ships, and a large portion of them

at sea.

Against such an overwhelming disparity of numbers, while numerous merchant-vessels were spread over almost every sea, what was the best policy for the American government to pursue ? The question is easily answered. Send these frigates immediately to sea to protect our own merchant-ships, and order them to take, burn, sink, and destroy the enemy, wherever he should be found. Also, tell them that if they meet a man-ofwar of equal or even superior force, should the disparity not be too great, to attack him forthwith, regardless of consequences.

For the result of such a deterniination, I refer the reader to Cooper's Naval History, and to the official government documents on that subject.

After these remarks respecting the United States' navy, I will go on to record the daring exploits of the privateers and letters-of-marque.

Before I commence with the prizes made by the pri

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* The British Government publishes annually a list of its whvie navy with a particular description of the ships composing it, commencing with a first-rate, carrying 120 guns, down to the cutter of 4, with alihe intermediate rates. I refer the reader to Steel's List of the Royal Cary, for the years 1811 and 12, as my authority, and also to Fenimore Cooper's Ilistory of the I'riter! States Nary of the sine date.

vateers, I will just stop to notice that the first English merchantinan captured, was a British ship from Jamaica, bound to London (she was probably taken off Cape Hatteras), and sent into Norfolk by a revenue cutter. This occurred about the 1st of July, say twelve days after the declaration of war.

On the 10th of July, the British government schooner Whiting, Lieut. Maxey, with despatches from his government to the government of the United States, was taken while lying in Hampton Roads (he not having heard of the war), without resistance, by the privateer Dash, of Baltimore, Captain Carroway. The Dash, at this time,

, was ready for sea, and bound on a cruise for British merchantmen.

On the 18th of July, the letter-of-marque schooner Falcon, belonging to Baltimore, on her passage from Boston to Bordeaux, with four guns and sixteen men, when on the coast of France, was engaged with the British cutter Hero, with five guns and fifty men for two hours and a-half, and finally beat her off, with considerable loss on both sides, after repulsing the eneiny three times in his attempts to board. On the next day, the Falcon was attacked by a British privateer of six guns and forty men, and although considerably injured by hier engagement with the cutter the day previous, the privateer commenced a heavy fire on the Falcon, which she bravely returned for an hour and a-half, when the captain and several of the crew of the Falcon being wounded, she was carried by boarding, while her colors were still flying. They were carried into Guernsey, where the wounded were taken on shore.

I find the following in a New York paper, dated July 14th : “We believe that in sixty days from the day on which war against England was declared, there will be

afloat from the United States not less than one hundred privateers, carrying upon an average six guns and seventy-five men. If these are successful, their number will probably be doubled in a short time. At any rate, sixty-five were at sea on the 16th, and many others are probably out from different ports which have not been reported.

" Philadelphia, July the 20th.- This day four privateers of considerable force left the capes of the Delaware on a cruise, and others are preparing to follow. In the latter part of this month, prizes were almost daily pouring into most of the Atlantic ports."

PRIZES TAKEN BY PRIVATEERS DURING THE MONTH OF JULY.

The privateer Paul Jones, of New York, captured the British brig Ulysses from the West Indies for Halifax, and sent her into Norfolk.

The letter-of-marque Gypsey of New York for Bordeaux, was captured by a British cruiser, and retaken by her crew and carried safely into France.

SUCCESSFUL CRUISE.--"Salem, July 10th.-Last evening the privateer schooner Fame, Captain Webb, returned to port, having taken a ship of near 300 tons, loaded with square timber, and a brig of 200 tons, loaded with tar. The ship had two four-pounders, but was prerented from firing or making any defence by our boarding her so suddenly.”

July 14th, the British government transport, No. 50, having two guns, musketry, etc., with twelve men, prize to the Madison privateer, was sent into Gloucester ; she was from Halifax, bound to St. Johns. The transport was under convoy of the Indian, British sloop-of-war, but observing a privateer (supposed to be the sloop Tolly), she gave chase to her, and while she

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