Sketches of the English constitution. (First-class lit. readers).

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James Stuart Laurie
Thos. Murby, 1864 - Great Britain - 84 pages
 

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Page 55 - That the freedom of speech, and debates or proceedings in Parliament, ought not to be impeached or questioned in any court or place out of Parliament.
Page 55 - That levying money for or to the use of the crown, by pretence of prerogative, 'without grant of parliament, for longer time, or in other manner than the same is or shall be granted, is illegal.
Page 61 - Will you to the utmost of your power maintain the laws of God, the true profession of the gospel and the protestant reformed religion established by law...
Page 55 - That the raising or keeping a standing army within the kingdom in time of peace, unless it be with consent of parliament, is against law.
Page 56 - And that for redress of all grievances, and for the amending, strengthening, and preserving of the laws, Parliaments ought to be held frequently.
Page 54 - That the pretended power of dispensing with laws or the execution of laws by regal authority as it hath been assumed and exercised of late is illegal.
Page 73 - After this, one of the members is directed to carry it to the lords, and desire their concurrence; who, attended by several more, carries it to the bar of the house of peers, and there delivers it to their speaker, who comes down from his woolsack to receive it. It...
Page 57 - ... from being issued for any other service, and the officers of the exchequer to obey any such warrant. This has given the house of commons so effectual a control over the executive power, or, more truly speaking, has rendered it so much...
Page 76 - The answer is, by the judges in the several courts of justice. They are the depositories of the laws ; the living oracles, who must decide in all cases of doubt, and who are bound by an oath to decide according to the law of the land.
Page 29 - For, when the tenant shall make homage to his lord, he shall be ungirt, and his head uncovered, and his lord shall sit, and the tenant shall kneel before him on both his knees, and hold his hands jointly together between the hands of his lord, and shall...

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