The French Spoliation Claims: Hearings Before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Claims, United States Senate, Sixty-ninth Congress, First Session, on S. 62, a Bill for the Allowance of Certain Claims for Indemnity for Spoliations by the French Prior to July 31, 1801, as Reported by the Board of Claims. March 5 and 6, 1926

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U.S. Government Printing Office, 1926 - French spoliation claims - 43 pages
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Page 13 - Touching the adventures and perils which we the assurers are contented to bear and do take upon us in this voyage...
Page 25 - When that convention was laid before the Senate, it gave its consent and advice that it should be ratified, provided that the second article be expunged, and that the following article be added or inserted : ' It is agreed that the present convention shall be in force for the term of eight years from the time of the exchange of the ratifications...
Page 13 - ... of the seas, men of war, fire, enemies, pirates, rovers, thieves, jettisons, letters of mart and countermart, surprisals, takings at sea, arrests, restraints, and detainments of all kings, princes, and people, of what nation, condition, or quality soever...
Page 25 - The government of the United States having added to its ratification that the convention should be in force for the space of eight years, and having omitted the second article, the government of the French republic consents to accept, ratify, and confirm the above convention, with the addition importing that the convention shall be in force for the space of eight years, and with the retrenchment of the second article : Provided thai, by this retrenchment, the two states renounce the respective pretensions...
Page 13 - Takings at Sea, Arrests, Restraints and Detainments of all Kings, Princes, and People, of what Nation, Condition, or Quality soever, Barratry of the Master and Mariners, and of all other Perils, Losses, and Misfortunes, that have or shall come to the Hurt, Detriment, or Damage of the said Goods and Merchandises and Ship, &c., or any Part thereof...
Page 23 - February, 1778, the treaty of amity and commerce of the same date, and the convention of the 14th of November, 1788, nor upon the indemnities mutually due or claimed, the parties will negotiate further on these subjects at a convenient time...
Page 8 - ... the merchants of the United States, concerned in foreign commerce or navigation, that due attention will be paid to any injuries they may suffer on the high seas or in foreign countries, contrary to the law of nations or to existing treaties : and that on their forwarding hither well authenticated evidence of the same, proper proceedings will be adopted for their relief.
Page 8 - I have it in charge from the President to assure the merchants of the United States concerned in foreign commerce or navigation that due attention will be paid to any injuries they may suffer on the high seas or in foreign Countries contrary to the law of nations, or to existing treaties and that on their forwarding hither well authenticated evidence of the same proper proceedings will be adopted for their relief.
Page 25 - November, 1788, nor upon the indemnities mutually due or claimed, the parties will negotiate further on these subjects at a convenient time; and until they may have agreed upon these points the said treaties and convention shall have no operation, and the relations of the two countries shall be regulated as follows: ART.
Page 8 - Jefferson, already adduced, when he announced that he had it "in charge from the President to assure the merchants of the United States concerned in foreign commerce or navigation, that due attention will be paid to any injuries they may suffer on the high seas or in foreign countries.

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