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STEAM AND SAIL VESSELS-Continued.

SPECIAL SOUND SIGNALS.

International rules of 1885 in force on the high Rules of the United States for harbors, rivers, and seas and coastwise waters. inland waters.

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(d) Coal-boats, trading-boats, produce-boats, canal-boats, oyster-boats, fishing-boats, rafts, or other water-craft, navigating any bay, harbor, or river, by hand-power, horse-power, sail, or by the current of the river, or anchored or moored in or near the channel or fair-way of any bay, harbor, or river, and not in any port, shall sound a foghorn, or equivalent signal, which shall make a sound equal to a steam-whistle, at intervals of not more than two minutes.

STEAM AND SAIL VESSELS-Continued.

SPECIAL SOUND SIGNALS.

Proposed international rules of 1890.

(g) Asteam-vessel wishing to indicate to another The way is off my vessel, you may feel your way past me, may sound three blasts in succession, namely, short, long, short, with intervals of about one second between them.

(h) A vessel employed in laying or picking up a telegraph cable shall, on hearing the fog-signal of an approaching vessel, sound in answer three prolonged blasts in succession.

(i) A vessel under way, which is unable to get out of the way of an approaching vessel through being not under command, or unable to maneuver as required by these rules, shall, on hearing the fog-signal of an approaching vessel, sound in answer four short blasts in succession.

Sailing vessels and boats of less than twenty tons gross tonnage shall not be obliged to give the above-mentioned signals, but, if they do not, they shall make some other efficient sound-signal at intervals of not more than one minute.

Rules for the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence River.

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STEAM AND SAIL VESSELS-Continued.

MODERATE SPEED IN FOG.

International rules of 1885 in force on the high Rules of the United States for harbors, rivers, and seas and coast wise waters. inland waters.

ART. 13. Every ship, whether a sailing-ship or a steamship, shall in a fog, mist, or falling snow go at a moderate speed.

See rule twenty-one.

STEERING AND SAILING RULES.

PRELIMINARY-RISK OF COLLISION.

SAILING VESSELS.

ART. 14. When two sailing-ships are approaching one another so as to involve risk of collision, .one of them shall keep out of the way of the other, as follows, namely:

(a) A ship which is running free shall keep out of the way of a ship which is close-hauled.' (b) A ship which is close-hauled on the port tack shall keep out of the way of a ship which is close-hauled on the starboard tack.

(c) When both are running free, with the wind on different sides, the ship which has the wind on the port side shall keep out of the way of the o: her.

(d) When both are running free, with the wind on the same side, the ship which is to windward shall keep out of the way of the ship which is to leeward.

(e) A ship which has the wind aft shall keep out of the way of the other ship.

RULE SIXTEEN. If two sail-vessels are meeting end on, or nearly end on, so as to involve risk of collision, the helms of both shall be put to port, so that each may pass on the port side of the other.

RULE SEVENTEEN. When two sail-vessels are crossing so as to involve risk of collision, then, if they have the wind on different sides, the vessel with the wind on the port side shall keep out of the way of the vessel with the wind on the starboard side, except in the case in which the vessel with the wind on the port side is close-hauled, and the other vessel free, in which case the latter vessel shall keep out of the way. But if they have the wind on the same side, or if one of them has the wind aft, the vessel which is to windward shall keep out of the way of the vessel which is to leeward.

STEAM VESSELS MEETING.

ART. 15. If two ships under steam are meeting end on, or nearly end on, so as to involve risk of collision, each shall alter her course to starboard, so that each may pass on the port side of the other. This article only applies to cases where ships are meeting end on, or nearly end on, in such a manner as to involve risk of collision, and does not apply to two ships which must, if both keep on their respective courses, pass clear of each other. The only cases to which it does apply are when each of the two ships is end on, or nearly end on, to the other; in other words, to cases in which by day each.ship sees the masts of the other in a fine, or nearly in a line, with her own, and by night to cases in which each ship is in such a position as to see both the sidelights of the other. It does not apply by day to cases in which a ship sees another ahead crossing her own course, or by night to cases where the red light of one ship is opposed to the red light of the other, or where the green light of one ship is opposed to the green light of the other, or where a red light without a green light, or a green light without a red light, is seen ahead, or where both green and red lights are seen anywhere but ahead.

RULE EIGHTEEN. If two vessels under steam are meeting end on, or nearly end on, so as to involve risk of collision, the helms of both shall be put to port, so that each may pass on the port side of the other.

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ART. 17. When two sailing vessels are approaching one another, so as to involve risk of collision, one of them shall keep out of the way of the other, as follows, namely:

(a) A vessel which is running free shall keep out of the way of a vessel which is close-hauled. (b) A vessel which is close-hauled on the port tack shall keep out of the way of a vessel which is close-hauled on the starboard tack.

(c) When both are running free, with the wind on different sides, the vessel which has the wind on the port side shall keep out of the way of the other.

(d) When both are running free, with the wind on the same side, the vessel which is to the wind ward shall keep out of the way of the vessel which is to leeward.

(e) A vessel which has the wind aft shall keep out of the way of the other vessel.

RULE 16. When two sailing vessels are approaching one another so as to involve risk of collision one of them shall keep out of the way of the other, as follows, namely:

(a) A vessel which is running free shall keep out of the way of a vessel which is closehauled. (b) A vessel which is closehauled on the port tack shall keep out of the way of a vessel which is closehauled on the starboard tack.

(c) When both are running free, with the wind on different sides, the vessel which has the wind on the port side shall keep out of the way of the other.

(d) When they are running free, with the wind on the same side, the vessel which is to windward shall keep out of the way of the vessel which is to leeward.

STEAM VESSELS MEETING.

ART. 18. When two steam-vessels are meeting end on, or nearly end on, so as to involve risk of collision, each shall alter her course to starboard, so that each may pass on the port side of the other.

This article only applies to cases where vessels are meeting end on, or nearly end on, in such a manner as to involve risk of collision, and does not apply to two vessels which must, if both keep on their respective courses, pass clear of each other.

The only cases to which it does apply are when each of the two vessels is end on, or nearly end on, to the other; in other words, to cases in which, by day, each vessel sees the masts of the other in a line, or nearly in a line, with her own; and by night, to cases in which each vessel is in such a position as to see both the side-lights of the other.

It does not apply by day to cases in which a vessel sees another ahead crossing her own course; or by night, to cases where the red light of one vessel is opposed to the red light of the other, or where the green light of one vessel is opposed to the green light of the other, or where a red light without a green light, or a green light without a red light, is seen ahead, or where both green and red lights are seen anywhere but ahead."

RULE 17. When two steam vessels are meeting end on, or nearly end on, so as to involve risk of collision each shall alter her course to starboard, so that each shall pass on the port side of the other.

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STEAM VESSEL TO KEEP OUT OF WAY OF SAIL VESSEL.

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SIGNALS OF STEAMERS SHOWING COURSE.

ART. 19. In taking any course authorized or required by these regulations, a steamship under way may indicate that course to any other ship which she has in sight by the following signals on her steam-whistle, namely:

One short blast to mean "I am directing my course to starboard."

Two short blasts to mean "I am directing my course to port."

Three short blasts to mean "I am going full speed astern."

The use of these signals is optional, but if they are used the course of the ship must be in accordance with the signal made.

PASSING SIGNALS.

SEC. 4412 The Board of Supervising Inspectors shall establish such regulations to be observed by all steam vessels in passing each other, as they shall from time to time deem necessary for safety: two printed copies of such regulations, signed by them, shall be furnished to each of such vessels, and shall at all times be kept posted up in conspicu ous places in such vessels.

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