Science and Literature in the Middle Ages, and at the Period of the Renaissance

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D. Appleton & Company, 1878 - Art, Medieval - 552 pages
 

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Page 345 - And the whole earth was of one language, and of one speech. "And it came to pass, as they journeyed from the east, that they found a plain in the land of Shinar; and they dwelt there. "And they said one to another, Go to, let us make brick, and burn them thoroughly.
Page 352 - Pro Deo amur et pro christian poblo et nostro commun salvament, d'ist di in avant, in quant Deus savir et podir me dunat, si salvarai eo cist meon fradre Karlo, et in...
Page 345 - And the Lord said, Behold the people is one, and they have all one language ; and this they begin to do : and now nothing will be restrained from them, which they have imagined to do. Go to, let us go down, and there confound their language, that they may not understand one another's speech.
Page 162 - Paris. instead of a franc." These precautions were evidently taken in order that access to the professorships of St. Cosmo might be limited to students who, by their learning and application to work, would be capable of sustaining the aristocracy of the surgical body against the invading democracy of the barbers. There was, moreover, very ample room for choice, as the College of St. Cosmo comprised only ten sworn surgeons. The number of barbers, upon the other hand, steadily increased, and from forty,...
Page 399 - Words and Music. Translated by Fetis in his " General History of Music." Tacitus, " possessed some very ancient poems, in which were celebrated the warlike actions and noble deeds of their ancestors, and which were transmitted from father to son as the only annals of their race." Among the Gauls the Druids preserved as a sacred deposit the religious poems which dated from the very earliest times, and which contained the mysteries of their religion (Fig. 319), and these religious poems were in no...
Page 144 - Medicine continued, as before, to be one of the branches of philosophy. When the municipal regime arose upon the ruins of the empire of Charlemagne, when the spirit of independence and isolation gave laymen a share with ecclesiastics in civil functions, a struggle of interest and vanity commenced between these two distinct classes, which composed society at that time*, The monks soon saw that if they were to retain their monopoly Fig. 100. — Cure through the Intercession of a Healing Saint. —...
Page 378 - Dans ta garde dorée, il ya bien des reliques : » Une dent de saint Pierre, du sang de saint Basile, » Des cheveux de monseigneur saint Denis, » Du vêtement de la vierge Marie.
Page 311 - ... liveries, upon the trappings of their horses (Fig. 254), upon their dog-collars, and upon the hoods of their falcons and hawks. Towards the fifteenth century the blazons were made more complex by the addition of the helmet or distinctive sign ; that is to say, above the shield there was placed the heaume (chevalier's helmet), either full-face, threeparts face, or in profile ; and according to its shape and the way in which it was made, it indicated exactly, and at a single glance, the condition...
Page 180 - ... Middle Ages. This was Vincent of Beauvais, the wonderful encyclopaedist, who lived, so to speak, amongst the ancients at a time when their most splendid works were despised and reviled. Vincent of Beauvais was accused of sorcery because he avoided the idle discussions of the schools, in order to i8o work in his laboratory in the St. Chapelle yard. The high intelligence of the King, and the piety of his mother, Queen Blanche, were scarcely enough to shield their learned protege from the most absurd...
Page 528 - ... for the armies of Charlemagne, as the missionaries of the sixteenth century opened America to the armies of Spain." Preaching was not the sole arena in which religious oratory had to do battle. The Councils, which were, so to speak, the guardians of the sacred deposit of orthodox faith, and to which the Middle Ages owe, even in the Fig. 396. — Preaching of the first Missionary Apostles.— After a Tapestry in Tournay Cathedral, made at Arras in 1402.

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