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(which is more clearly indicated in a series of Maps accompanying this Report, exhibiting correct surveys and delineations of all the Rivers, Lakes, Water Communications, and Islands, embraced by the VIth Article of the Treaty of Ghent, by a black line, shaded on the British side with red, and on the American side with blue; and each sheet of which series of Maps is identified by a Certificate, subscribed by the Commissioners, and by the two principal Surveyors employed by them) is the true Boundary intended by the two before mentioned Treaties; that is to say:

Beginning at a stone Monument, erected by Andrew Ellicott, Esq. in the Year 1817, on the South Bank, or Shore, of the said River Iroquois, or Cataragui, (now called the St. Lawrence) which Monument bears South 74 deg. 45 min. West, and 1,840 yards distant from the stone Church in the Indian Village of St. Regis, and indicates the point at which the 45th parallel of North Latitude strikes the said River; thence, running North 35 deg. 45 sec. West into the River, on a line at right angles with the Southern shore, to a point 100 yards South of the opposite Island, called Cornwall Island; thence, turning Westerly, and passing around the Southern and Western sides of said Island, keeping 100 yards distant therefrom, and following the curva. tures of its shores, to a point opposite to the North-west corner, or angle, of said Island; thence, to and along the middle of the main River, until it approaches the Eastern extremity of Barnhart's Island; thence, Northerly, along the Channel which divides the last mentioned Island from the Canada shore, keeping 100 yards distant from the Island, until it approaches Sheik's Island; thence, along the middle of the Strait which divides Barnhart's and Sheik's Islands, to the Channel called the Long Sault, which separates the two last mentioned Islands from the lower Long Sault Island; thence, Westerly, (crossing the centre of the last mentioned Channel) until it approaches within 100 yards of the North shore of the Lower Sault Island; thence, up the north branch of the River, keeping to the North of, and near, the lower Sault Island, and also North of, and near, the Upper Sault (sometimes called Baxter's) Island, and South of the two small Islands, marked on the Map A and B, to the Western extremity of the Upper Sault, or Baxter's Island; thence, passing between the two Islands called the Cats, to the middle of the River above; thence, along the middle of the River, keeping to the North of the small Islands marked C and D; and North also of Chrystler's Island, and of the small Island next above it, marked E, until it approaches the North-east angle of Goose Neck Island; thence, along the passage which divides the last mentioned Island from the Canada shore, keeping 100 yards from the Island, to the upper end of the same; thence, South of, and near, the two small Islands called the Nut Islands; thence, North of, and near, the Island marked F, and also of the Island called Dry or Smuggler's Island; thence, passing between the Islands marked G and H, to the North of the Island called Isle au Rapid Plat; thence, along the North side of the last mentioned Island, keeping 100 yards from the shore, to the upper end thereof; thence, along the middle of the River, keeping to the South of, and near, the Islands called Cousson (or Tussin) and Presque Isle; thence, up the River, keeping North of, and near, the several Gallop Isles, numbered on the Map 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, and 10, and also of Tick, Tibbet's, and Chimney Islands; and South of, and near, the Gallop Isles, numbered 11, 12, and 13, and also of Duck, Drummond, and Sheep Islands; thence, along the middle of the River, passing North of Island No. 14, South of 15 and 16, North of 17 ; South of 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, and 28, and North of 26 and 27; thence, along the middle of the River, North of Gull Island and of the Islands No. 29, 32, 33, 34, 35, Bluff Island, and No. 39, 44, and 45, and to the South of No. 30, 31, 36, Grenadier Island, and No. 37, 38, 40, 41, 42, 43, 46, 47, and 48, until it approaches the East end of Well's Island; thence, to the North of Well's Island, and along the Strait which divides it from Rowe's Island, keeping to the North of the small Islands No. 51, 52, 54, 58, 59, and 61, and to the South of the small Islands numbered and marked 49, 50, 53, 55, 57, 60, and X, until it approaches the North-east point of Grindstone Island; thence, to the North of Grindstone Island, and keeping to the North also of the small Islands No. 63, 65, 67, 68, 70, 72, 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, and 78, and to the South of No. 62, 64, 66, 69, and 71, until it approaches the Southern point of Hickory Island; thence, passing to the South of Hickory Island, and of the two small Islands lying near its Southern extremity, numbered 79 and 80; thence, to the South of Grand or Long Island, keeping near its Southern shore, and passing to the North of Carlton Island, until it arrives opposite to the South-western point of said Grand Island in Lake Ontario; thence, passing to the North of Grenadier, Fox, Stony, and the Gallop Islands, in Lake Ontario, and to the South of, and near, the Islands called the Ducks, to the middle of the said Lake; thence, Westerly, along the middle of said Lake, to a point opposite the mouth of the Niagara River; thence, to and up the middle of the said River, to the Great Falls; thence, up the Falls, through the point of the Horse Shoe, keeping to the West of Iris or Goat Island, and of the group of small Islands at its head, and following the bends of the River so as to enter the Strait between Navy and Grand Islands; thence, along the middle of said Strait, to the head of Navy Island; thence, to the West and South of, and near to, Grand and Beaver Islands, and to the West of Strawberry, Squaw, and Bird Islands, to Lake Erie; thence, Southerly and Westerly, along the middle of Lake Erie, in a direction to enter the passage immediately South of Middle Island, being one of the Easternmost of the group of Islands lying in the Western part of said Lake; thence, along the said passage, proceeding to the North of Cunningham's Island, and of the three Bass Islands, and of the Western Sister, and to the South of the Islands called the Hen and Chickens, and of the Eastern and Middle Sisters; thence, to the middle of the mouth of the Detroit River, in a direction to enter the Channel which divides Bois-blanc and Sugar Islands; thence, up the said Channel to the West of Bois-blanc Island, and to the East of Sugar, Fox, and Stony Islands, until it approaches Fighting, or Great Turkey Island; thence, along the Western side and near the shore of said last mentioned Island, to the middle of the River above the same; thence, along the middle of said River, keeping to the South-east of, and near, Hog Island, and to the North-west of, and near, the Island called Isle à la Pêche, to Lake St. Clair; thence, through the middle of said Lake, in a direction to enter that mouth or Channel of the River St. Clair which is usually denominated The Old Ship Channel; thence, along the middle of said Channel, between Squirrel Island on the South-east and Herson's Island on the North-west, to the upper end of last mentioned Island, which is nearly opposite to Point au Chênes, on the American shore; thence, along the middle of the River St. Clair, keeping to the West of, and near, the Islands called Belle Riviere Isle, and Isle aux Cerfs, to Lake Huron; thence, through the middle of Lake Huron, in a direction to enter the Strait or Passage between Drummond's Island on the West, and the little Manitou Island on the East; thence, through the middle of the passage which divides the two last mentioned Islands; thence, turning Northerly and Westerdly, around the Eastern and Northern shores of Drummond's Island, and proceeding in a direction to enter the passage between the Island of St. Joseph's and the American shore, passing to the North of the intermediate Islands No. 61, 11, 10, 12, 9, 6, 4, and 2, and to the South of those numbered 15, 13, 6, and l; thence, up the said last mentioned passage, keepiug near to the Island St. Joseph's, and passing to the North and East of Isle à la Crosse, and of the small Islands numbered 16, 17, 18, 19, and 20, and to the South and West of those numbered, 21, 22, and 23, until it strikes a line (drawn on the Map with black ink, and shaded on one side of the point of intersectioa with blue, aud on the other side with red) passing across the River at the head of St. Joseph's Island, and at the foot of the Neebish Rapids, which line denotes the termination of the Boundary directed to be run by the VIth Article of the Treaty of Ghent.

And the said Commissioners do further decide and declare, that all the Islands lying in the Rivers, Lakes, and Water Communications, between the before described Boundary Line and the adjacent Shores of Upper Canada do, and each of them does, belong to His Britannick Majesty, and that all the Islands lying in the Rivers, Lakes, and Water Communications, between the said Boundary Line and the adjacent Shores of The United States, or their Territories, do, and each of them does, belong to The United States of America, in conformity with the true intent of the IId Article of the said Treaty of 1783, and of the VIth Article of the Treaty of Ghent.

In faith whereof, we, the Commissioners aforesaid, have signed this
Declaration, and thereunto affixed our Seals.

Done in Quadruplicate, at Utica, in The State of New York, in the
United States of America, this 18th day of June, in the Year of our
Lord 1822.
(L.S.) ANTH. BARCLAY. (L.S.) PETER B. PORTER.

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DECLARATION of the Provisional Government of Greece to Christian Nations.-Corinth, 27th April, 1822.

(Translation.) La grande lutte dans laquelle est engagée la Nation Grecque a occupée l'Europe, comme elle occupera un jour les plumes des Historiens. Dans le premier moment, toutes les ames droites et sensibles se sont rejouies en entendant retentir ces mots : “la Grèce combat pour sa liberté.” Devenue la victime de l'oppression la plus humiliante et la plus tyrannique, elle a excité la commisération du Monde Civilisé;

l'humanité a demandé à haute voix la délivrance de sa bienfaitrice, 1

l’Europe le rétablissement de sa partie la plus intéressante et la plus précieuse. La justice éternelle a déchiré le voile devant le trône du Tout Puissant, et a accusé les Profanateurs impies des mystères chrétiens, les dépredateurs sanguinaires des fortunes légitimes, qui s'abreuvent des larmes de la veuve et de l'orphelin. Comment s'est-il pu faire que la politique, au lieu de bénir d'aussi justes efforts, ait si étrangement méconnu leur véritable nature ? Comment est-il possible qu'une malveillance inouie cherche à calomnier et à dénaturer les intentions d'une Nation opprimée, et à envenimer une entreprise qui a à peine besoin d'excuse ? L'Insurrection Grecque n'avoit-elle pas un motif cathégorique dans la Tyrannie Ottomane toujours en flagrant délit?. Ne savoit-on pas que le désespoirs et les armes deviendroient bientôt les moyens de parvenir à l'indépendance et à la liberté légitime? Quelles que pussent être l'occasion, le prétexte et les circonstances de l'explosion du mouvement insurrectionnel, il étoit néanmoins évident, qu'ils avoient leur source dans un mécontentement intérieur, général et nourri depuis longtems; mécontentement dont les terribles suites devoient tôt ou tard mettre la Grèce en feu. Du'reste, le soulèvement de cette Nation n'est ni une Révolte ni une Insurrection. Il n'est pas davantage une parodie sans but, ou une émanation matérielle en morale de ces secousses politiques, dont le caractère équivoque a fait faire des réflexions sérieuses aux hommes sensés. Les vexations horribles que la Grèce avoit à souffrir, prouvoient assez que nous n'appartenions pas à une Puissance Protectrice et légale, et que la légitimité se deshonoreroit elle-même, si elle vouloit mettre sa cause en parallèle avec la conduite de ces Barbares inexorables, que notre anéantissement politique n'avoit point adoucis, et qu'une ombre de liberté civile met en fureur. Aucun serment, aucun Traité de nous lioit à un Pouvoir absolu fondé sur la force, qui semblable à la plus mortelle épidémie, infectoit l'atmosphère de notre Patrie dévastées Ce n'étoit pas sans quelque vraisemblance, quoique foible et éloignée, d'un heureux succès, que le tems étoit arrivé, non de renverser une Royauté Nationale et révérée, non de sacrifier une situation supportable, bien que défectueuse, aux phantômes d'une perfection imaginaire, mais de briser la verge de fer de nos Tyrans, de repousser la force par la force, et de substituer un état légal, invariable, à une existence précaire, sans Lois et sans protection. Et quel desastre plus grand ou plus funeste pouvoit-on craindre que celui où ont été plongés Candie, l'Epire et la Morée ? Une Administration détestable, digne fille du Gouvernement avide du Troisième Mahomed, modèle de brigandage et de pillage, qui tous les jours étoit mise officiellement à l'enchère, arrachoit à un Peuple opprimé les dernières gouttes de son sang. C'est en vain que les plaintes des malheureux s'élevoient de toutes parts, elles retentissoient, sans pénétrer, jusqu'à la région, d'où émanoit l'autorité qui nous écrasoit.

Déjà le désespoir, causé par le délai des secours, commençoit à présenter à la misère de plusieurs Provinces, un changement de religion, comme le dernier moyen pour parvenir à la tranquillité, et à faire évanouir les droits sacrés que l'évangile s'étoit acquis sur la reconnoissance pieuse de la Nation Grecque. Mais l'Europe auroit-elle préféré voir sous ses yeux ce monstrueux parjure ? auroit-elle, quoique fière d'une Alliance toute Chrétienne, voulu donner de nouveau son suffrage au triomphe du Coran sur la sainte écriture, de la barbarie sur la civilisation ? Il a fallu prendre les armes pour périr du moins avec honneur. Qu'on ne se fasse point ici illusion sur ce grand problème; en politique chaque illusion a aussi sa punition, qui est d'autant plus rigoureuse que les intérêts et les tems que l'on méconnoit, sont plus importans. Ici, dans le cas actuel, tout nait et découle de la force des choses. Les hommes, les lieux, les paroles ne comptent pour rien. Le premier pas une fois fait, quoique d'une manière violente, il a fallu continuer sous peine d'être anéanti. La Révolution, populaire dans ses motifs, devoit le devenir encore plus par les événemens, qui l'ont suivie. Le sort affreux de tout ce que la Nation Grecque possedoit d'hommes distingués et de familles celébres, la destruction des églises et des écoles, les effets d'une vengeance féroce, ont montré

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