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BIOGRAPHY-continued :

CHAPTER XVI. -Progress of the Confederation Scheme

Death of Sir E. P. Taché-Negotiations for the '

Reconstruction of the Cabinet.....

951

CHAPTER XVII.--Mr. Brown advocates the Acquisition of

the North-West Territory-Withdrawal from the

Government-Confederation Accomplished........ 10

CHAPTER XVIII.--Mr. Brown's work in achieving Reli-

gious Equality and Colonial Union-Correspondence

with Dr. Ryerson

103

CHAPTER XIX.—The Reform Convention of 1867—Reso-

lution of Thanks to Mr. Brown-Mr. Brown's Reply 112

CHAPTER XX.-Mr. Brown contests South Ontario_His

Bow Park Farm-His Interest in Confederation.... 117

CHAPTER XXI.-Letter to the Roman Catholic Committee. 12.2

CHAPTER XXII.-Mr. Sandfield Macdonald's “Patent Com-

bination"_The Elections of 1872–Mr. Brown and

Mr. Justice Wilson......

123

CHAPTER XXIII. -Mr. Brown made Senator-Appointed

Joint Plenipotentiary to Washington-Declines the

Lieutenant-Governorship of Ontario, and the Title

of K.C.M.G......

135

CHAPTER XXIV.-Mr. Brown's Assassination, Universal

Sympathy and Sorrow—The Funeral Obsequies ... 141

CHAPTER XXV.-Mr. Brown's Services to Liberalism in

Canada–Estimate of his Public and Private Char-

acter

147

IN MEMORIAM :

City Council of Toronto

157

Buffalo City Council...

157

University of Toronto....

158

From Canadians in Chicago'.

158

City Council, Ottawa. ..

159

City Council, Guelph..

160

Galt Town Council

160

Toronto Presbytery

160

Coloured Citizens of Toronto.

161

Congregational Church

162

Cobden Club, England

162

Extract from Proceedings of the County Council of County

of Oxford

162

· INTRODUCTION.

STATE OF POLITICAL AFFAIRS IN CANADA ON MR. BROWN'S

ARRIVAL IN 1843.

It is impossible to present any fair estimate of Mr. Brown's life and character, or to do justice to his merits as a public man, without dealing to a certain extent with the public questions in the discussion of which he was engaged for thirty-six years.

When Mr. Brown first appeared in Canada the country had not recovered from the shock and confusion caused by the ill-advised insurrectionary movements of 1837-9. These movements were brought about by a quarter of a century's misgovernment at the hands of a small but compact body of men, whose professed excessive loyalty to king and church, though marred by an abhorrence of popular rights, had generally secured to them the support of the British Government, then also controlled to a great extent by the same unjust and antiprogressive spirit.

The leaders of the popular party were almost exclusively engaged in a battle with the powers of the day on specific grievances complained of, and consequently gave comparatively little attention to the advocacy of fundamental principles of government which, left to operate freely, would have removed all grievances by due course of law. Mr. Lindsey, in his life of Wm. Lyon Mackenzie, says : "complained of the government, when they ought to have struck a blow “at the system which rendered it possible for a party who could com

mand only a small minority in the popular branch of the legislature “ to continue their grasp on the reins of power.” Wild attacks on the leaders of the Canadian oligarchy (sometimes embracing the Governor), and petitions to the Secretary of State for the colonies, on subjects which the Canadian people, left to themselves, would have immediately put right, were perhaps to be expected ; nor would it be just now to severely blame, or to blame at all, that mode of procedure ; but such a course only anticipated some temporary relief in some specific cases of injustice caused by a bad system of government, rather than looked for a radical cure.

The initiation of a system of partially responsible government with the union of the two Canadas did not rapidly tend to produce perfect contentment, for the simple reason that the name existed without the

“ The people

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