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THE ACCENT, OR SYLLABIC EMPHASIS, ALONE REGULATES ENGLISH VERSE.

AMONG PAINTERS, THE EPITHET ACCESSORY IS GIVEN TO THOSE PARTS OF AN HISTORICAL PIECE WHICH ARE MERELY ORNAMENTAL.

ACE] The Scientific and Literary Treasury; (aco more restricted sense, the term is applica- tilled vinegar, or the acid of vinegar, is obble to a person appointed to keep the ac- tained from mucilaginous substances by counts of a public company or office: thus, fermentation. we say the accountant of the India-Com- ACE'TUM, vinegar, or any acid liquor pany, the Custom-house, the Excise, &c. made from potable juices, particularly wine

-ACCOUNTANT-GENERAL, in the court and beer. of Chancery, is an officer appointed to re- ACHROMAT'IC, colourless; a term apceive all monies lodged in court.

plied to telescopes which were first conACCOU'TREMENTS, the necessaries of trived by Dr. Bevis to remedy the aberraa soldier, as belts, pouches, cartridge- tions of colour. boxes, &c.

ACIC'ULÆ, in natural history, certain ACCREʼTION, the increase or growth small spikes, or prickles, in form of needles, of a body by an external addition of new wherewith nature has armed several ani. parts; thus shells, stones, and various other mals, as the hedge-hog, echinus marinus, substances are formed.

&c. ACCUBATION, the posture used among ACID, in a general sense, denotes such the Greeks and Romans at their meals, things as affect the palate with a sour, which was with the body extended on a sharp, and tart taste; change blue vegetacouch, and the head resting on a pillow, or ble colours to red; and combine with all on the elbow, supported by a pillow. This the alkalis, and most of the metallic oxydes practice was not permitted among soldiers, and earths, so as to form the compounds children, and servants; nor was it known called salts. Acids are distinguished acuntil luxury had corrupted manners. Their cording to the proportion of oxygen which couches were called ACCUBITA.

they contain, by the terminations ic and ACEPH'ALI, a sect of Christians, so ous, as nitric acid, and nitrous acid, sul. called because they admitted no head, or phuric acid, and sulphurous acid; the forsuperior, either lay or ecclesiastic.

mer of which denotes the larger dose or ACER'RA, in Roman antiquity, was a portion of oxygen, and the latter the small altar erected near the bed on which smaller. When the prefix hypo is put to a dead person was laid out. Incense and either of these, it denotes a degree below perfume were burnt upon it, till the time it in point of oxidizement, as osulphuric of the funeral. The real intention, pro- acid, an intermediate between the sulphu. bably, was to prevent or overcome any of- ric and the sulphurous acid. The principal fensive smells that might arise about the acids are vinegar and its spirits; the juices corpse.

of lemons, oranges, sorrel, citrons, &c.; ACETAB'ULUM, in anatomy, is a large also the spirits of nitre, alum, vitriol, sulround cavity in a bone, which receives the phur, and sea-salt. Acid and alkali have convex head of another, thereby forming been considered by some chemists as the that species of articulation termed enar- two athletæ of nature, the great instruthrosis. Also the name of a Roman mea- ments whereby all things were effected ; sure equal to about one-eighth of our pint. and the cause not only of natural, but pre

ACETATES,certain neutral salts formed ternatural things, as diseases and cures. by the combination of acetic acid with a ACIDIFIABLE, capable of being consalifiable base, as the acetate of potash. verted into an acid by an acidifying prinThese salts differ from acetites in this re- ciple. An acidifiable base or radical is any spect; the acid employed in the production substance that is capable of uniting with of the former is fully saturated with oxy- such a quantity of oxygen as to become gen, or the acidifying principle, that is, it possessed of acid properties. is completely acid ; while that which is ACID'ULÆ, or ACIDULATED WATERS, used to form the latter, contains a less pro- a species of mineral waters which contain portion of oxygen than is sufficient to satu- a considerable quantity of carbonic acid, rate it.

and which are known by the pungency of ACETIC ACID, a vegetable acid, which their taste, the sparkling appearance which is produced by distilling the acetous acid they assume when shaken or poured from with metallic oxydes. It is of a green co- one vessel into another, and the facility lour, but becomes white by rectification; is with which they boil. extremely volatile and inflammable; cor- ACID'ULOUS, an epithet expressing rodes and cauterizes the skin; and when either a slight degree of acid, or an excess heated in contact with air, takes fire. It is of acid in a compound salt. the sour principle, in fact, which exists in ACINE'SIA, the interval of rest which vinegar.

takes place between the contraction and ACETIM'ETER, an apparatus for deter- dilatation of the pulse. mining the strength of vinegar.

ACI'NUS, in botany, a name given to A"CETITES, compound or neutral salts, grapes or berries growing in clusters, in formed by the union of the acetous acid, or opposition to baccae, or such berries as distilled vinegar, with different bases: the

grow single. most remarkable of these substances, and ACLI'DES, a missile weapon, in usc those whose properties are best known, are amongst the Romans; it was of the form the acetite of alumine, copper and lead. of a spear with a thong tied to it, by which,

ACE'TOUS, an cpithet applied to such after the discharge, it was drawn back. substances as are sour, or partake of the ACOLLE', in heraldry, a term somenature of vinegar.-ACETOUS Acid, dis- times used to denote two things joined to

WHEN NERO PLAYED IN THE THEATRE, FIVE THOUSAND SOLDIERS CHANTED ACCLAMATIONS, AND THE SPECTATORS WERE OBLIGED TO JOIN THEM.

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ACCLAMATIONS WERE GIVEN BY THE VOICE; APPLAUSES, BY THE HANDS.

IN PROPORTION AS THE AIR IS DENSER, SOUNDS ARE MORE INTENSE.

ACTIONS CONTINED TO A SINGLE SHOCK UPON TIK XAR ARK TERMED NOISHS; THOSE WHICU PRODUCE A CONTINUED SENSATION, SOUNDS.

Acq] A New Dictionary of the Belles Lettres. (ACR gether; at other times, animals with col. ACRA'SIA, in medicine, the predomi. lars or crowns about their necks; and nancy of one quality above another. It finally, batons, or swords, placed saltier- was also used to express excess of any kind, wise behind the shield.

as the drinking of unmixed wine, which ACOLY'THI, in ecclesiastical history, among the Greeks amounted to intempedenotes candidates for the ministry, so rance. called from their continually attending the A'CRE, a measure of land, very general bishop. It is also an appeilation given to in name, but varying in different places as the stoics, on account of their steady adhe. to the extent which it is intended to de. rence to what they had once resolved. note. The English acre contains 4 square

ACONITA, a vegetable poison extracted roods, or 160 square poles of 5 yards and a from the aconite, or wolfsbane.

half, or 4840 square yards. The French A"CONITE, the plant wolfsbane, or acre is equal to one and a quarter of an monks-hood, the flower of which resembles English acre. the hood of a monk; the plant is a violent AC'RID, an epithet to denote such sub. poison.

stances as are hot, dry, and pungent to the ACONTIAS, in zoology, a venomous taste. serpent, otherwise called the anguis facu. ACRISʻIA, or A'CRISY, the want of a lus, or dart-snake, from its vibrating its crisis, or discriminating state, in a disorder body in the manner of a dart.

which is very fluctuating: ACONTIUM, in Grecian antiquity, a ACROATIC, in the Aristotelian schools, kind of dart or javelin, resembling the Ro- a denomination given to such lectures as man pilum,

were calculated only for the intimate ACOUSMATICI, in Grecian antiquity, friends and disciples of that philosopher ; such disciples of Pythagoras, as had not being chiefly employed in demonstrating finished their five years probation. The some speculative or abstruse part of philoacousmatici were instructed by bare posi- sophy. The acroatic lectures stood con. tive precepts and rules, without reasons or tradistinguished from the exoteric ones, demonstrations, and these precepts they which were adapted to a common auditory. called acousmata.

ACROBATICA, or ACROBATICUM, ACOUSTICS, that branch of science in Grecian antiquity, an engine on which which treats of the nature and modifica people were raised aloft, that they might tions of sound. It is usually divided into have the better prospect. two parts, viz. diacoustics, which explains ACROCERAU'NIAN, an epithet applied the properties of those sounds that come di- to certain mountains, between Epirus and rectly from the sonorous body to the ear; Illyricum, which project into the Adriatic, and catacoustics, which treats of reflect and obtain their name from being often ed sounds. Almost all sounds that affect struck with lightning. us are conveyed to the ear by means of the ACROCHIRIS'MUS, among the Greeks, air; but water is a good conductor of was a sort of gymnastic exercise, in which sound; so also are timber and flannel. It the two combatants contended with their must be observed, that a body, while in the hands and feet only, without closing or enact of sounding, is in a state of vibration, gaging the other parts of the body. It which it communicates to the surrounding was, in fact, a species of wrestling. air, and that the undulations

of the air affect

ACRODRYA, in natural history, all the ear, and excite in us the sense of sound. fruits that have rinds or shells, such as Sound, of all kinds, it is ascertained, tra- acorns, almonds, &c. vels at the rate of thirteen miles in a mi. ACROʻMION, in anatomy, that part of nute: the softest whisper travels as fast as the spine of the scapula which receives the the most tremendous thunder. The know. end of the clavicle. ledge of this fact has been applied to the ACROMONOGRAMMATICUM, a po. measurement of distances. Thus, if we see etical compositon, wherein each subsequent a vivid flash of lightning, and in two se- verse commences with that which the verse conds hear a tremendous clap of thunder, preceding terminates. we may be assured that the thunder cloud ACRONICAL, or ACHRON'YCAL, in is not more than 760 yards distant. astronomy, an appellation given to the

ACQUITTAL, a discharge, deliverance, rising of a star above the horizon, at sunor setting free of a person from the guilt set; or to its setting, when the sun rises. or suspicion of an offence. Acquittal is of Acronical is one of the three poetical ris, two kinds; in law, and in fact. When two ings of a star; the other two being called are indicted and tried for a felony, one as cosmical and helical. principal, the other as accessary, the prin. ACROPOLIS, the citadel of Athens. It cípal being discharged, the accessary is, by was formerly the whole city, and at first consequence, also freed: in which case, as called Acropia, from Acrops the founder; the accessary is acquitted by law, so is the but, after the inhabitants were greatly in. principal in fact.-Acquittal is also used creased in number, the whole plain around for a freedom from entries and molesta- it was filled with buildings, and the ori. tions of a superior lord, on account of ser. ginal city became the centre, under the devices issuing out of land.

nomination of Acropolis, or the upper city. ACQUITTANCE, a discharge in writ. A'CROSPIRE, the popular term for ing for a sum of money, witnessing that what among botanists is called the germ, the party is paid the same.

plume, or plumule.

IN ANCIENT THEATRES, ACOUSTIC VESSELS, OR TUBES OY BRASS, WERE USED TO PROPEL THX VOICE OP THE ACTORS TO A GREAT DISTANCE.

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AN ECHO RETURNS A MONOSYLLABLE AT FORTY FEET DISTANCE.

ACTION, WHEN PRODUCED BY ONE BODY ON ANOTHER, IS CALLED MECHANICAL.

AT THE CLOSE OF EACH SESSION, THE ACTS OF PARLIAMENT ARE COLLECTED INTO ONE BODY, AND ARRANGED IN SEPARATE CHAPTERS.

ACT] The Scientific and Literary Treasury; [ACT

ACROSTIC, a poem, the lines of which act of the king in council, whereby, at are so contrived, that the first letters of the beginning of a new reign, or on other each, taken together, will make a proper great occasions, a free pardon has been name or other word.

sometimes granted to criminals. ACROSTICUM, in botany, the name of ACTS OF THE APOSTLES, a canonical a genus of the cryptogamia class of plants, book of the New Testament, which conand of that order called the filices, the tains great part of the lives of St. Peter fructifications of which are collected into and St. Paul; commencing at the ascenclusters, and cover the whole under-surface sion of our Saviour, and continued down to of the leaves.

St. Paul's arrival at Rome, after his appeal ACROSTOʻLIUM, in the naval architec- to Cæsar; comprehending in all about ture of the ancients, the extreme part of thirty years. St. Luke has been generally the ornament used on the prows of their taken for the author. ships. It was usual to tear the acrostolia AC'TA PUB’LICA, in Roman history, from the prows of vanquished ships, as a the journal of the senate. It seems to have token of victory:

resembled the votes of the House of ComACROTE’RIA, in architecture, small mons amongst us, wherein a short account pedestals, upon which globes, vases, or was given to the public of what passed in statues stand at the ends or middle of pe- the senate-house. diments. It also denotes the figures them- AC'TA DIUR'NA, was a sort of Roman selves placed in such situations. Among gazette, containing an authorised narrative ancient physicians, the term ACROTERIA of the transactions worthy of notice, which was used to denote the larger extremities happened at Rome. of the body.

ACTA CONSISTOʻRII, the edicts or ACROTHYM'IA, in surgery, a large tu. declarations of the council of state of the mour, usually rising in the shape of a wart, emperors. though sometimes depressed and flat.

AC'TIAN GAMES, or LUDI ACTIACA, ACT, in a general sense, denotes the ex- were instituted in commemoration of the ertion, or effectual application, of some victory obtained by Augustus over Anthony power or faculty. Act is distinguished at Actium. They returned every fifth year, from power, as the effect from the cause, according to the general opinion, and were or as a thing produced, from that which sacred to Apollo, who was then called Ac. produces it. Act, among logicians, tius Apollo. Actian years became an era, more particularly denotes an operation of commencing from the battle of Actium, the human mind; in which sense, compre- called also the era of Augustus. The Achending, judging, willing, &c. are called tian games consisted of shows of gladiaacts. -Act, in law, is used for an instru- tors, wrestlers, and other exercises, and ment or deed in writing, serving to prove were kept generally at Nicopolis, a city the truth of some bargain or transaction. built by Augustus, near Actium, for that Thus, records, certificates, &c. are called purpose, with a view to perpetuate the fame acts. Act is also used for the final reso- of his victory. lution, or decree of an assembly, senate, ACTIN'IA, or SEA ANEMONIES, in zoocouncil, &c.-Acts of parliament are logy, a genus belonging to the order of called statutes; acts of the royal society, vermes mollusce. They are viviparous, and transactions; those of the French academy form one of those wonderful links in the of sciences, memoirs ; those of the academy chain of creation, that connect the animal of sciences at Petersburg, commentaries; and vegetable kingdoms, by partaking of those of Leipsic, acta eruditorum; the de. the nature of both. crees of the lords of session, at Edinburgh, ACTIN'OLITE, a mineral, of which acta sederunt, &c.—Acr, in the universi- there are three varieties, the crystallized, ties, is the delivery of orations, or other the asbestous, and the glassy. It is prinexercises, in proof of the proficiency of a cipally found in primitive districts, with a student who is to take a degree. At Ox magnesian basis. ford, the time when masters or doctors ACTION, in mechanics and physics, is complete their degrees, is called the act. the pressure or percussion of one body At Cambridge, the same period is called against another. It is one of the laws of the commencement.--Act, in a dramatic nature, that action and re-action are equal, sense, is the name given to certain portions that is, the resistance of the body moved of a play, intended to give respite both to is always equal to the force communicated the spectators and the actors. In the an- to it; or, which is the same thing, the cient drama, five acts were required both moving body loses as much of its force as in tragedy and comedy; and in what is it communicates to the body moved. termed the regular drama that rule is still Action, in ethics, something done by a free observed, the acts being divided into smaller or moral agent, capable of distinguishing portions, called scenes.

good from evil. The essence of a moral acACT or Fartu, or AUTO-DA-TE. In dark tion consists in its being done knowingly and barbarous countries, where the Spa- and voluntarily: that is, the agent must nish inquisition had power, the act of faith not only be able to distinguish whether it was a solemn murder of infidels and here- be good or bad in itself; but he must liketics, usually performed on some great fes. wise be entirely free from compulsion of tival, and always on a Sunday.-Act or any kind, and at full liberty to follow the Grace, in English law, an extraordinary dictates of his own understanding. Hence

THE WORD ACTION IS GENERALLY USED FOR ORDINARY TRANSACTIONS; AND ACT, FOR SUCH AS ARE REMARKABLE OR DIGNIFIED.

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ACTION, WIEN PRODUCED BY ONE'S OWN WILL, IS SPONTANEOUS OR VOLUNTARY.

THE COMMERCE OF GREAT BRITAIN IS ACTIVE; THAT OF CHINA IS PASSIVE.

ACTIVE CAPITAL, IS PROPERTY THAT MAY READILY BE CONVERTED INTO MONEY, AND USED IN TRADE OR COMMERCE FOR PROFIT.

ACT] A New Dictionary of the Belles Lettres. [ADA the actions of idiots, slaves, &c. cannot be and if their moral conduct be irreproachcalled moral. Hence also appears the ab- able, no persons are more esteemed or surdity of fatalism, which undermines the lauded. very foundation of morality.---Action, in ACTRESS, a female dramatic performer. rhetoric, may be defined, the accommoda- They were unknown to the ancients, among tion of the voice, but more especially the whom men always took the parts of women. gesture of an orator, to the subject he is Nor were they introduced on the English upon. Cicero tells us, " that it does not stage till the days of the Stuarts. so much matter what an orator says, as ACTUA'RIUS, or ACTA'RIUS, in Rohow he says it.” Horace, in his art of po- man antiquity, an officer, or rather notary, etry, is no less explicit in setting forth its appointed to write down the proceedings vast influence on mankind:

of a court.-Actuarii were also officers “ With those who laugh, our social joy ap- who kept the military accounts, and dispears;

tributed the corn to the soldiers. With those who mourn, we sympathize in AC'TUARY, the chief clerk, or person, tears;

who compiles minutes of the proceedings If you would have me weep, begin the strain, of a company in business. Then I shall feel your sorrows; feel your AC'TUS, in antiquity, a measure of pain.”

length containing one hundred and twenty ACTION, in a theatrical sense, is nearly Roman feet. the same with action among orators; only

ACU'LEATE, or ACU'LEATED, an apthe actor adapts his action to an assumed pellation given to any thing that has aculei, character, whereas the orator is supposed or prickles: thus, in ichthyology, fishes to be in reality what his action expresses. are divided into aculeated, and non-acu.

-ACTION, in painting and sculpture, de- leated. notes the posture of a statue or picture, ACU'MEN, mental sharpness, or quick serving to express some passion, &c.- discernment; great intellectual capacity: Action, in the military art, is an engage- In ancient music, acumen denotes a sound ment between two armies, or between dif- produced by raising the voice to a high ferent bodies of troops belonging thereto. pitch.

ACTIONS, in law, are either criminal or ACU'MINA, in antiquity, a kind of micivil. (For the various kinds, see Dictionary litary omen, taken from the points or edges of Law Terms, in the “ Treasury of Know- of spears, swords, &c. ledge."]

ACUPUNCTURATION, an oriental ACTIONARY, in commerce, a term practice of puncturing diseased parts of used among foreigners, for the proprietor the body with fine needles, by which the of an action or share of a public company's morbid galvanic action of the parts is restock.

stored, and painful disorders removed. In ACTIVE, in a general sense, denotes China and Japan it has been a part of their something that communicates motion or system of surgery time out of mind, and of action to another, in which sense it stands late years it has been in some repute in opposed to passive. --ACTIVE, among England. grammarians, an appellation given to words ACU'TE, an appellation given to such expressing some action, as I write, I read, things as terminate in a sharp point, or &c.ACTIVE POWER, in metaphysics, edge: thus, we say an acute angle, acutethe power of executing any work or labour; angled triangle, &c.--ACUTE, in music, in contradistinction to speculative powers, an epithet given to sharp or shrill sounds, in as those of seeing, hearing, reasoning, &c. opposition to those called grave.--ACUTE

-ACTIVE PRINCIPLES, in chemistry, DISEASES are distinguished from CHRONIC, those which act of themselves, without any by being attended with violent symptoms, foreign assistance: such are mercury, sul- and requiring immediate aid : chronic disphur, and salt, supposed to be. Some au- eases, those which usually last long. thors contend that sulphur, or fire, is the ACYROLO'GIA, in grammar, denotes an only active principle and source of all the improper word, phrase, or expression: it motion in the world, and there are others differs a little from the catachresis. who call oil, salt, and spirit, active prin- AD, a Latin preposition, expressing the ciples, merely because their parts are bet- relation of one thing to another. It is freter fitted for motion than those of earth or quently prefixed to other words: thus, AD water.

HOMINEM, among logicians, an argument AC'TOR, in a dramatic sense, is a man drawn from the professed belief or prinwho enacts some part or character in a ciples of those with whom we argue. play. It is remarkable with what differ- AD LUDOS, in Roman antiquity, a kind of ence actors were treated among the an. punishment, whereby the criminals entercients. At Athens they were held in such tained the people, either by fighting with esteem, as to be sometimes sent on em- wild beasts, or with each other.-AD bassies to foreign powers; whereas, at VALOREM, in commerce, according to the Rome, if a citizen became an actor, he value.- AD INFINITUM, indefinitely, or to thereby forfeited his freedom. Actors in infinity. the present day have little to complain of, ADÁGIO, a degree quicker than grave in regard to the treatment they receive : time, in music, but with graceful and ele. according as they contribute to the gratifi- gant execution. cation of the public so are they rewarded; AD'AMANT, a sort of diamond, and the

ACTIVE COMMERCE, IS THAT IN WHICH A NATION CARRIES ITS OWN PRODUCTIONS AND YOREIGN COMMODITIES IN ITS OWX SHIPS.

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ADAMANTINE SPAR WILL CUT GLASS EASILY, AND SCRATCH ROCK CRYSTAL.

ADHESION IS USED IN A LITERAL SENSE; ADIERENCE, METAPHORICALLY.

IN THE ROMAN LAW, THE MAKING OVER GOODS TO ANOTHER, EITHER BY SALE OR LEGAL SENTENCE, WAS TERMED BONA ADDICTA.

ADI] The Scientiâc and Literary Treasury ; [Adm hardest, most brilliant, and most valuable court or other meeting till another day. of the precious stones.

In parliament, adjournment differs from ADDER, a small poisonous serpent with prorogation, the former being not only for plaits on the belly, and scales under the the shorter time, but also done by the tail; it is by no means rare in Britain. house itself, whereas the latter is an act of

ADDICTI, in Roman history, those who royal authority. were delivered over to their creditors to be AD’JUNCT, some quality belonging either made slaves until they discharged their to body or mind, either natural or acquired. debts.

Thus, thinking is an adjunct of the mind, ADDI"TION, in a general sense, is the and growth of the body. It also denotes uniting or joining several things together : something added to another, without being or, it denotes something added to another. any necessary part of it. Thus water ab.

-ADDITION, in arithmetic, the first of sorbed by a sponge is an adjunct, but no the four fundamental rules of that art, necessary part of that substance. whereby we connect into a total sum se- AD'JUTANT, a military officer, whose veral small ones. When the number has duty it is to carry orders from the major to only one kind of figures, it is called simple the colonel and serjeants. When detachaddition; when it has two or several de- ments are to be made, he gives the number nominations, it is compound. ADDITIONS to be furnished by each company or troop, in law, denote all kinds of designations and assigns the hour and place of rendezgiven to a man, over and above his proper vous. He also places the guards, receives name and surname, to show his estate, de- and distributes the ammunition to the gree, profession, place of abode, &c. companies, &c.

ADENOGʻRAPHY, or ADENOL'OGY, ADJUTANT-GEN'ERAL, an officer of that part of anatomy which treats of the distinction, who assists the general, by glands.

forming the several details of duty of the ADDORS’ED, a term in heraldry, sig- army with the brigade majors. nifying back to back.

ADLOCUTION, or ADLOCUẤTIO, in 6 A'DEPS, in anatomy, denotes the fat Roman antiquity, the address made by gefound in the abdomen; differing from the nerals to their armies, in order to rouse common fat or pinguedo, as being thicker, their courage before a battle. harder, and of a more earthy substance. ADMINICLE, in Scotch law, signifies ADEPs, among physicians, is used in a more any writing or deed referred to by a party, general sense, for all kinds of animal fat. in an action of law, proving his allegations.

ADHESION, the phenomenon by which ADMINISTRATION, the executive gothe particles of bodies continue together. vernment of a country. Adhesion denotes union to a certain point ADMINISTRATOR, in law, the perbetween two bodies, and Cohesion retains son to whom the estate and effects of an together the component particles of the intestate are committed, for which he is to same mass. — Adhesion, among logicians, be accountable when required. denotes the maintaining some tenet, merely AD'MIRAL, the commander of a fleet of on account of its supposed advantage, ships of war; having two subordinate comwithout any positive evidence of its truth. manders, as vice-admiral and rear-admiral;

In medicine, it signifies the junction of and distinguished into three classes, by the parts that ought to be separated.

colour of their flags, as white, blue, and ADIANTHUM, in botany, maiden-hair; red. The admiral carries his flag at the a genus of plants of the order filices, and main-top-mast head; the vice-admiral at class cryptogamia, They are perennials. the fore-top-mast head; and the rear-ad.

ADIPOʻCERE, a substance resembling miral, at the mizen-top-mast head. The spermaceti, which is formed from an ani. LORD High ADMIRAL OF GREAT BRITAIN, mal in its progress towards decomposition. called in some ancient records, Capitaneus

AD'IPOŠE, in a general sense, denotes Marinorum, is judge or president of the something belonging to the fat of the body. court of admiralty. He has the manageThe term adipose is chiefly used by phy- ment of all maritime affairs, and the gosicians and anatomists, in whose writings vernment of the royal navy, with power of we read of adipose cells, adipose ducts, deciding in all maritime causes, both civil adipose membranes, adipose vessels, &c. and criminal. In short, his power is so

A'DIT OF A MINE, the aperture whereby extensive and absolute in all matters that it is entered, and the water and ores carried come under his cognizance, that the office away; it is distinguished from the air has usually been given to princes of the shaft, and usually made on the side of a blood, or the most eminent persons among hill. -ADIT OF A SHIP, in antiquity, was the nobility. For a short time it was filled a space in the upper part, where the ship by his late Majesty William IV. when duke was widest, at which people entered. of Clarence, after having been in abeyance ADITS OF A THEATRE, were doors on the just a century; during which period, as at stairs, whereby persons entered from the present, the office was executed by a certain outer porticoes, and descended into the number of commissioners, called lords of seats.

the admiralty. ADJECTIVE, in grammar, a word ex- ADMIRALTY, COURT OF, is a sovereign pressing some quality, or other accident, court, instituted by Edward III., and held of the substantive with which it is joined. by the lord high-admiral, or the commis

ADJOURNMENT, the putting off a sioners of the admiralty; where cognizance

AMONG THE JESUITS, A SELECT NUMBER WERE CALLED ADJUTANTS-GENERAL, EACH OF WHOM HAD A PROVINCE OR COUNTRY ASSIGNED HIM.

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THE ADIT, OR HORIZONTAL ENTRANCE OF A MINE, IS ALSO CALLED THE DRIFT.

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