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TOTAL ABSTINENCE ABOVE SEVEN DAYS IS SAID TO BE FATAL TO MAN.

TO ENCOURAGE THE FISHERIES, AND THEREBY INCREASE THE NUMBER OF MARINERS, QUEEN ELIZABETH PASSED LAWS IN FAVOUR OF ABSTINENCE.

ABS] A New Dictionary of the Belles Lettres. [aca naturalists for the fibres of the roots of wise liberality in this, which induces us to plants, which draw nourishment from the hope their efforts may eventually succeed. surrounding earth.

ÅBÄSTRACT, a concise but general view, ABSTEMII, a name given to persons who or analysis, of some large work; in which could not partake of the sacrament from sense it differs from an abridgment only as their natural aversion to wine.

being shorter, and its entering less miABSTERʻGENTS, medicines proper for nutely into particulars; and from an er. cleansing the body from concretions and tract, as this last is only a particular view other impurities, not to be effected by sim- of some part or passage of it. ple abluents. Abstergents are of a sapo- ABSTRACTION, in logic, that operation naceous nature, and therefore very different of the mind whereby it forms abstract ideas. from mere abluents.

The faculty of abstraction stands directly AB'STINENCE, the abstaining or re- opposite to that of compounding. By comfraining from what is either useful, agree-position we consider those things together, able, or pernicious; but more especially, which, in reality, are not joined together from eating and drinking. In the Romish in any one existence. And by abstraction, church there are “ days of abstinence," as we consider those things separately and well as “ fast days;" the former importing apart, which, in reality do not exist apart. a partial, and the latter, almost a total ab. In its passive sense it implies occupation stinence from food.

with one's-self to the exclusion of other ob. ABʻSTINENTS, a sect of Christians who jects.-ABSTRACTION, in chemistry, the appeared in France about the end of the process of drawing off by distillation any third century, professing celibacy, and ab- part of a compound, and returning it again stinence from particular kinds of food, &c. to the residue to be redistilled.

-The most rigid ABSTINENTS of the pre- ABSTRACTITIOUS, an epithet for the sent day, are those who, under the whim- native spirits of aromatic vegetables, in sical denomination of tee-totallers, (TEA- distinction from those produced by fertotallers ?) profess to abstain wholly from mentation. the use of all liquors stronger than tea or ABUT MENTS, the extremities of any coffee. In the United States, according to body adjoining another, as the extremities a calculation which has app nearly of a bridge resting on the banks or sides of half-a-million belong to the different "tem- a river. Also the junctions or meetings of perance societies ;” and even their disci. two pieces of timber. ples in England, on a general muster-day, ABYSS', any deep place that is supposed are able to make a display of forces suffi- to be bottomless, as the deepest or un. ciently numerous, we should think, to alarm fathomable parts of the sea. the proprietors and keepers of those tem- ACACIA, a beautiful shrub, one of ples of sin called gin-palaces, which rear the species of which bears rosc-coloured their unblushing heads in every street in flowers. In the materia medica, acacia the metropolis, presenting to the mind, is the inspissated juice of the pods of the when viewed in contrast with the squalid mimosa Nilotica of Linnæus. and filthy wretches who support them, a ACÆ'NA, a genus of curious evergreen truly appalling picture of moral, mental, herbaceous exotics, chiefly from South and physical degradation. Whatever means America and New Holland. may be found most effectual for banishing ACADEMICS, a sect of philosophers who the detestable vice of drunkenness from ci- followed the doctrine of Socrates and Plato, vilized life, should most assuredly be pro- as to the uncertainty of knowledge and moted, whether it be tee-totalism, the the incomprehensibility of truth. Aca stocks, or the whipping post; yet we can- demic, in this sense amounts to much the not help feeling that there is something same with Platonist; the difference bebordering upon the ludicrous in these pro- tween them being only in point of time. miscuous assemblages, where “reformed” They who embraced the system of Plato, drunkards, i.e. emaciated old sots, either among the ancients, were called Academici; affecting abstemiousness or having spent whereas those who did the same since the all their substance in bacchanalian orgies, restoration of learning, have assumed the set up for apostles of temperance, and de- denomination of Platonists. scant on their former bibulous propensi. ACAD'EMY, in Grecian antiquity, a ties, in order that blushing maidens and in- large villa in one of the suburbs of Athens, nocent youths may have an adequate idea where the sect of philosophers called Acaof the enormity of drinking a glass of home- demics held their assemblies. It took its made wine. It should, however be observed name from Academus, a celebrated Athethat, as among professing Christians some nian, who resided there, and became cele. are less strict than others, so among the brated from its being the place in which advocates of the "temperance system,” Plato taught philosophy:- ACADEMY, in some give much greater latitude than the modern acceptation, is a society of perothers to the meaning of the term ; nay, sons united for the pursuit of some objects there are those, we understand, who, so far of study and application, as the Royal from insisting on the necessity of tee-to- Academy of Arts of London, and the Royal talism, regard it as a wishy-washy doctrine, Academy of Sciences of Berlin. The first and are willin to allow their converts a academy of science, in modern times, was generous glass whenever the wants of the established at Naples, by Baptista Porta, body require one. There appcars to be a in 1560.

ACADEMIES OF THE FINE ARTS ARE THE BEST INCENTIVES TO GENIUS. [B 3

ABSTRACTION IS THE GROUND-WORK OF CLASSIFICATIOX, BY WHICH THINGS ARE ARRANGED IN ORDERS, GEXERA, AND SPECIES. THE ACCELERATION OF THE MOON WAS DISCOVERED BY DR. HALLEY.

ACANTHOPTERYGIOUS IS THE TERM APPLIED TO TUOSE FISHES WHICH HAVE WARD, BONY, AND PRICKLY BACK FINS.

ACA]

The Scientific and Literary Treasury; [ACC ACAL'YPHA, a genus of exotic shrubs, or pinnace used in military affairs. The natives of North and South America: the acatium was a species of the naves accalyx of the male flowers consists of four tuariæ. small, roundish, concave, and equal petals, ACAUʼLOSE, or ACAU'LOUS, among but no corolla; in the female flower the botanists, a term used for such plants as calyx is composed of three leaves, and no have no stem. corolla.

ACCA’LIA, in Roman antiquity, solemn ACALEP'TÆ (Sea Nettles), third class festivals held in honour of Acca Laurentia, of Cuvier's Zoophites. The free species the nurse of Romulus: they were also call(acalepte libere), float on the sea. The ed Laurentalia. hydrostatic (acalepta hydrostaticæ), are so ACCAPITARE, in our old law books, named from the air bladders or vessels by the act of becoming a vassal, or paying which means they suspend themselves in homage to some lord. Hence ACCAPITUM the water.

signified the money paid by a vassal upon ACANA'CEÆ, a class of plants which such an occasion. are prickly, and hear their flowers and ACCELERATION, in mechanics, the seeds on a kind of head.

increase of velocity in a moving body. AcACANTHA, a name given to the prickles celerated motion is that which continually of thorny plants. Acantha is also used receives fresh accessions of velocity, and is by zoologists for the spines of certain either equally or unequally accelerated. fishes, as those of the echinus marinus, &c. The word is particularly applied to falling

ACANTHA'CEOUS, an epithet given to bodies tending towards the centre of the all the plants of the thistle kind.

earth by the force of gravity - ACCELEACANTHINE, among the ancients, RATING FORCE, being a sort of centripetal something belonging to, or resembling the force, is expressed by that velocity, geneherb acanthus: hence we read of acan- rated in a given time, with which bodies thine garments, acanthine woods, &c. (considered as physical points) move to.

ACAN'THOPIS, a genus of venomous wards the central body attracting them by serpents, classed by Cuvier with the vipers, its absolute force. This accelerating force but differing from them in many essential is greater or less, according to the distance characters. They are natives of New Hol. of the centre of the force, ir a reciprocal land, where they live in holes at the roots duplicate proportion. The word ACCELEof trees. Their name is derived from the RATION, is also used astronomically, and is tail, which is terminated by a little spur. applied to the moon, the planets, and fixed

ACANTHOPTERY'GII, one of the divi. stars. sions in the natural order of fishes which ACCENDENTES, or ACCENSOʻRES, Cuvier has established. Its name is sug. in the church of Rome, an inferior rank of gested by its spinous fins.

ministers, whose business it is to light, ACANTHOŠ'CELIS, a genus of insects. snuff, and trim the candles and tapers. Order, coleoptera; family, scarabide.

ACCEN DONES, in Roman antiquity, ACANTHOCI'NUS, a genus of insects. officers in the gladiatorial schools, who exOrder, coleoptera; family, cerambycide. cited and animated the combatants during

ACAN'THURUS (Thorn-tailed or Lan- the engagement. cet Fish), a genus of fishes; ninth family ACCEN'SI, in Roman antiquity, certain of Cuvier's order, with spinous fins; found supernumerary soldiers, designed to supin the West Indian Seas, and much re- ply the place of those who should be killed, lished as food.

or anywise disabled.--ACCENSI also deACANTHUS, in architecture, an orna- noted' a kind of inferior officers, appointed ment representing the leaves of the acan- to attend the Roman magistrates. thus, or herb bear's-breech; principally AC'CENT; a modification of the voice employed in the Corinthian and Compo in pronouncing certain words or syllables: site capitals.

also, the marks on the words or syllables; ACANZII, Turkish light-horse, the as, the acute accent, marked thus ('), the avant-guard of the Grand Seignor's army. grave accent thus (0) the circumflex thus

ACASTA, a genus of shells found in (). This is called grammatical accent, but sponge, and never affixed to hard bodies. there is also a rhetorical accent or empha

A'CARUS, in zoology, a numerous genus sis, which is designed to give to a senof insects, comprehending the vermin which tence distinctness and clearness. In a infest several animals, and mites in general. sentence, therefore, the stress is laid on

ACATALEPSY (acatalepsia), among an. the most important word, and in a word on cient philosophers, the impossibility of the most important syllable. When the comprehending something; uncertainty in accent falls on a vowel, that vowel has its science.

long sound, as in po'rous; but when it falls ACA'TERY, an officer of the king's on a consonant, the preceding vowel is household, designed to be a check between short, as in potter. Accents also not only the clerks of the kitchen and the pur- give a pleasing variety and beauty to the veyors.

modulation of the voice, but often serve ACATHOL'ICI, the name by which to ascertain the true meaning of the word. Protestants are distinguished in some ca- In music, accent denotes a certain motholic countries, as a term less objection-dulation or warbling of the sounds, to able than heretics.

express passions, either naturally by the ACAPTIUM, in antiquity, a kind of boat voice, or artificially by instruments. Every

TIE ACCELERATION OF A PLANET, IS THE INCREASE OF ITS REAL DIURNAL MOTION, ABOVE ITS MEAN DIURNAL MOTION.

6

THE ACCENSI IN THE ROMAN ARMIES FOUGHT WITHOUT ARMOUR.

IN COMMERCE, AN ACCOUNT IS A REGISTRY OF DEBTS, CREDITS, AND CHARGES.

MANY OF THE MINERAL ACIDS ABE FOUND IN GREAT ABUNDANCE IN NATURE, THOUGH GENERALLY COMBINED WITH OTHER SUBSTANCES.

Acc]

A New Dictionary of the Belles Lettres. [acc bar or measure is divided into the accented including four genera of birds of prey, and unaccented parts; the former being whose distinguishing characteristics are, the principal, on which the spirit of the that they have hooked bills, strong legs, music depends. In mathematics, the ac. and sharp claws, cent is used to avoid the confusion of using ACCLAMATION, in Roman antiquity, too many letters in an algebraical problem. a shout raised by the people, to testify their

ACCEN’TOR, a genus of birds which applause, or approbation of their princes, feed both on insects and seed; as the com- generals, &c. In ages when people were mon hedge sparrow.

more accustomed to give full utterance to ACCEPTANCE, in commerce, is when their feelings, acclamations were very coin. a man subscribes, signs, and makes him mon, whenever a mass of people was influ. self a debtor for the sum contained in a enced by one common feeling. We find, bill of exchange, or other obligation, drawn therefore, acclamations in theatres, senates, upon, or addressed to him; which is done ecclesiastical meetings, elections, at nupby his writing the word "Accepted" on it, tials, triumphs, &c. In the carly times of and signing his name.

Christianity, the bishops were elected by ACCEPÄTOR, the person who accepts a acclamation. The first German emperors bill of exchange by signing it, and thereby were elected in the same way; and at the becoming bound to pay its contents. present day, wherever the forms of civilized

ACCEPTILATION, among civilians, sig. life are least regarded, approbation or dis. nifies an acquittance given by a creditor to approbation of proposed public measures a debtor, without receiving any money. is shown by acclamations of the assem.

ACCÉSS, in a general sense, denotes bled multitude. the approach of one thing towards another; ACCOLA, among the Romans, signified but it is more proper to say, the approach a person who lived near some place; in of bodies, the appulse of the planets, &c.- which sense it differed from incola, the inACCESS, or ACCESSION, in medicine, is habitant of such a place. used to denote the beginning of a paroxysm, ACCOLADE, the ancient ceremony of or a fit of some periodical disease.

conferring knighthood, by the king's laying AC'CESSARY, in law, a person who aids his arms about the young knight's neck, in the commission of some felonious action. and embracing him. This familiar expres. There are two kinds of accessaries, viz. be. sion of regard appears to have been ex. fore the fact, and after it. The first is he changed for the more stately act of touch. who commands and procures another to ing, or gently striking, with the royal commit an offence; who, though he be ab- sword, the neck of the knceling knight. sent when it is committed, is now regarded the present ceremony of conferring the as much a principal as the actual offender. honour of knighthood is evidently derived The accessary after the fact is one who re- from it. ceives, comforts, or assists the offender, ACCOM'PANIMENT, an instrumental knowing him to be such. In the highest part added to a musical composition by crimes, as high treason, &c. and the lowest, way of embellishment, and in order to sup. as riots, forcible entries, &c. there are no port the principal melody. When the piece accessaries, but all concerned are prin may be performed with or without the accipals.

companiment at pleasure, it is called acACCIACATU'RA, in music, a sweeping companiment ad libitum; but when it is of the chords of the pianoforte, and drop- indispensable, accompaniment obligato. ping sprinkled notes usual in accompani. ACCOM'PLICE, in law, a person who ments.

is privy to, or aiding in, the perpetration of ACCIDENS, or PER ACCIDENS, a term some crime. applied to the operations of natural bodies, ACCOMPLISHMENT, in a general in distinction from per se; thus fire is said sense, denotes the perfecting, or entirely to burn per se, but a heated iron per ac- finishing and completing any matter or cidens.

thing; but it more expressly describes the ACʻCIDENCE, a display of the varia- acquirement of some branch of learning, tions of words according their govern- useful art, or elegant amusement.Ac. ment or sense.

COMPLISHMENT is also particularly used ACCIDENT, that which belongs acci. for the fulfilment of a prophecy, in which dentally, not essentially, to a thing, as sense, we read of a literal accomplishment, sweetness, softness, &c. ACCIDENTAL, a mystical accomplishment, &c. in heraldry, an additional mark in a coat ACCORDATU'RA, an Italian word, to of arms, which may be either omitted or express the tuning of an instrument. retained, without altering its character. ACCOR'DION, a new musical instru

ACCIDENTAL, in philosophy, a term ment, of German invention, but now also applied to effects which result from causes made in this country, consisting of a douoccurring by accident. - ACCIDENTAL ble series of vibrating tongues, acted on by Point, in perspective, that point in the a current of air from a sort of bellows, and horizontal line, where all línes parallel producing tones very similar to those of the among themselves meet the perspective organ. plane. Accidental colours depend on the ACCOUNT'ANT, or ACCOMPTANT, affections of the eye in contradistinction to in a general sense, denotes one whose bn. light itself.

siness it is to compute, adjust, and range ACCIPITRES, the first order of birds, in due order accounts in commerce. In a

IN ACHROMATIC TELESCOPES, THE COLOURS OP REFRACTION ARE CORRECTED BY COMBINING GLASS LENSES OF DIFFERENT DISPERSIVE POWERS.

7

ACIDS AND ALKALIES, MIXED IN EQUAL PROPORTIONS, NEUTRALIZE EACH OTHER.

THE ACCELERATION OF THE MOON WAS DISCOVERED BY DR. HALLEY.

ACANTHOPTERYGIOUS IS THE TERM APPLIED TO TUOSE FISHES WHICH HAVE WARD, BONY, AND PRICKLY BACK FINS.

ACA] The Scientific and Literary Treasury ; [acc

ACAL'YPHA, a genus of exotic shrubs, or pinnace used in military affairs. The natives of North and South America: the acatium was a species of the naves accalyx of the male flowers consists of four tuaria. small, roundish, concave, and equal petals, ACAU'LOSE, or ACAU'LOUS, among but no corolla; in the female flower the botanists, a term used for such plants as calyx is composed of three leaves, and no have no stem. corolla.

ACCALIA, in Roman antiquity, solemn ACALEP'TÆ (Sea Nettles), third class festivals held in honour of Acca Laurentia, of Cuvier's Zoophites. The free species the nurse of Romulus: they were also call(acalepte libere), float on the sea. The ed Laurentalia. hydrostatic (acalepte hydrostatica), are so ACCAPITARE, in our old law books, named from the air bladders or vessels by the act of becoming a vassal, or paying which means they suspend themselves in homage to some lord. Hence ACCAPITUM the water.

signified the money paid by a vassal upon ACANA'CEÆ, a class of plants which such an occasion. are prickly, and hear their flowers and ACCELERA'TION, in mechanics, the seeds on a kind of head.

increase of velocity in a moving body. Ac. ACANTHA, a name given to the prickles celerated motion is that which continually of thorny plants.-ACANTHA is also used receives fresh accessions of velocity, and is by zoologists for the spines of certain either equally or unequally accelerated. fishes, as those of the echinus marinus, &c. The word is particularly applied to falling

ACANTHACEOUS, an epithet given to bodies tending towards the centre of the all the plants of the thistle kind.

earth by the force of gravity-Accele. ACANTHINE, among the ancients, RATING PORCE, being a sort of centripetal something belonging to, or resembling the force, is expressed by that velocity, geneherb acanthus: hence we read of acan- rated in a given time, with which bodies thine garments, acanthine woods, &c. (considered as physical points) move to.

ACAN'THOPIS, a genus of venomous wards the central body attracting them by serpents, classed by Cuvier with the vipers, its absolute force. This accelerating force but differing from them in many essential is greater or less, according to the distance characters. They are natives of New Hol. of the centre of the force, ir a reciprocal land, where they live in holes at the roots duplicate proportion. The word ACCELEof trees. Their name is derived from the RATION, is also used astronomically, and is tail, which is terminated by a little spur, applied to the moon, the planets, and fixed

ACANTHOPTERY'GII, one of the divi- stars. sions in the natural order of fishes which ACCENDENTES, or ACCENSOʻRES, Cuvier has established. Its name is sug in the church of Rome, an inferior rank of gested by its spinous fins.

ministers, whose business it is to light, ACANTHOSCELIS, a genus of insects. snuff, and trim the candles and tapers. Order, coleoptera; family, scarabide.

ACCEN DONES, in Roman antiquity, ACANTHOCINUS, a genus of insects. officers in the gladiatorial schools, who exOrder, coleoptera; family, cerambycide. cited and animated the combatants during

ACANTHURUS (Thorn-tailed or Lan- the engagement. cet Fish), a genus of fishes; ninth family ACCENSI, in Roman antiquity, certain of Cuvier's order, with spinous fins; found supernumerary soldiers, designed to supin the West Indian Seas, and much re- ply the place of those who should be killed, lished as food.

or anywise disabled.----ACCENSI also deACAN'THUS, in architecture, an orna- noted a kind of inferior officers, appointed ment representing the leaves of the acan- to attend the Roman magistrates. thus, or herb bear's-breech; principally AC'CENT; a modification of the voice employed in the Corinthian and Compo in pronouncing certain words or syllables: site capitals.

also, the marks on the words or syllables; ACANZII, Turkish light-horse, the as, the acute accent, marked thus ('), the avant-guard of the Grand Seignor's army. grave accent thus (0) the circumflex thus

ACASTA, a genus of shells found in ). This is called grammatical accent, but sponge, and never affixed to hard bodies. there is also a rhetorical accent or empha

A'CARUS, in zoology, a numerous genus sis, which is designed to give to a senof insects, comprehending the vermin which tence distinctness and clearness. In a infest several animals, and mites in general. sentence, therefore, the stress is laid on

ACATALEPSY (acatalepsia), among an- | the most important word, and in a word on cient philosophers, the impossibility of the most important syllable. When the comprehending something; uncertainty in accent falls on a vowel, that vowel has its science.

long sound, as in po'rous; but when it falls ACA'TERY, an officer of the king's on a consonant, the preceding vowel is household, designed to be a check between short, as in potter. Accents also not only the clerks of the kitchen and the pur- give a pleasing variety and beauty to the veyors.

modulation of the voice, but often serve ACATHOL'ICI, the name by which to ascertain the true meaning of the word. Protestants are distinguished in some Ca- -In music, accent denotes a certain motholic countries, as a term less objection- dulation or warbling of the sounds, to able than heretics.

express passions, either naturally by the ACATIUM, in antiquity, a kind of boat voice, or artificially by instruments. Every

TIE ACCELERATION OY A PLANET, IS THE INCREASE OF ITS REAL DIURNAL MOTION, ABOVE ITS MEAN DIURNAL MOTION.

6

THE ACCENSI IN THE ROMAN ARMIES YOUGHT WITHOUT ARMOUR.

IN COMMERCE, AN ACCOUNT IS A REGISTRY OF DEBTS, CREDITS, AND CHARGES.

MANY OF THE MINERAL ACIDS ARE FOUND IN GRIAT ABUNDANCE IN NATURE, THOUGH GENERALLY COMBINED WITH OTHER SUBSTANCES.

ACC] A New Dictionary of the Belles Lettres. [acc bar or measure is divided into the accented including four genera of birds of prey, and unaccented parts; the former being whose distinguishing characteristics are, the principal, on which the spirit of the that they have hooked bills, strong legs, music depends. In mathematics, the ac- and sharp claws. cent is used to avoid the confusion of using ACCLAMATION, in Roman antiquity, too many letters in an algebraical problem. a shout raised by the people, to testify their

ACCEN’TOR, a genus of birds which applause, or approbation of their princes, feed both on insects and seed; as the com- generals, &c. In ages when people were mon hedge sparrow.

more accustomed to give full utterance to ACCEPTANCE, in commerce, is when their feelings, acclamations were very coma man subscribes, signs, and makes him. mon, whenever a mass of people was influ. self a debtor for the sum contained in a enced by one common feeling. We find, bill of exchange, or other obligation, drawn therefore, acclamations in theatres, senates, upon, or addressed to him; which is done ecclesiastical meetings, elections, at nup. by his writing the word "Accepted” on it, tials, triumphs, &c. In the carly times of and signing his name.

Christianity, the bishops were elected by ACCEP TOR, the person who accepts a acclamation. The first German emperors bill of exchange by signing it, and thereby were elected in the same way; and at the becoming bound to pay its contents. present day, wherever the forms of civilized

ACCEPTILATION, among civilians, sig. life are least regarded, approbation or dis. nifies an acquittance given by a creditor to approbation of proposed public measures a debtor, without receiving any money.

is shown by acclamations of the assem. ACCESS, in a general sense, denotes bled multitude. the approach of one thing towards another; AC'COLA, among the Romans, signified but it is more proper to say, the approach a person who lived near some place; in of bodies, the appulse of the planets, &c.- which sense it differed from incola, the inACCESS, or ACCESSION, in medicine, is habitant of such a place. used to denote the beginning of a paroxysm, ACCOLADE, the ancient ceremony of or a fit of some periodical disease.

conferring knighthood, by the king's laying AC'CESSARY, in law, a person who aids his arms about the young knight's neck, in the commission of some felonious action and embracing him. "This familiar expres. There are two kinds of accessaries, viz. be. sion of regard appears to have been ex. fore the fact, and after it. The first is he changed for the more stately act of touchwho commands and procures another to ing, or gently striking, with the royal commit an offence; who, though he be ab. sword, the neck of the kneeling knight. sent when it is committed, is now regarded The present ceremony of conferring the as much a principal as the actual offender. honour of knighthood is evidently derived The accessary after the fact is one who re- from it. ceives, comforts, or assists the offender, ACCOM'PANIMENT, an instrumental knowing him to be such. In the highest part added to a musical composition by crimes, as high treason, &c. and the lowest, way of embellishment, and in order to supas riots, forcible entries, &c. there are no port the principal melody. When the piece accessaries, but all concerned are prin may be performed with or without the accipals.

companiment at pleasure, it is called acACCIACATU'RA, in music, a sweeping companiment ad libitum; but when it is of the chords of the pianoforte, and drop- indispensable, accompaniment obligato. ping sprinkled notes usual in accompani. ACCOM'PLICE, in law, a person who ments.

is privy to, or aiding in, the perpetration of ACCIDENS, or PER ACCIDENS, a term some crime. applied to the operations of natural bodies, ACCOM'PLISHMENT, in a general in distinction from per se; thus fire is said sense, denotes the perfecting, or entirely to burn per se, but a heated iron per ac- finishing and completing any matter or cidens.

thing; but it more expressly describes the ACCIDENCE, a display of the varia- acquirement of some branch of learning, tions of words according to their govern- useful art, or elegant amusement. -Ac. ment or sense.

COMPLISHMENT is also particularly used ACCIDENT, that which belongs acci- for the fulfilment of a prophecy; in which dentally, not essentially, to a thing, as sense, we read of a literal accomplishment, sweetness, softness, &c. ACCIDENTAL, a mystical accomplishment, &c. in heraldry, an additional mark in a coat ACCORDATU'RA, an Italian word, to of arms, which may be either omitted or express the tuning of an instrument. retained, without altering its character. ACCOR'DION, a new musical instru.

ACCIDENTAL, in philosophy, a term ment, of German invention, but now also applied to effects which result from causes made in this country, consisting of a douoccurring by accident. -ACCIDENTAL ble series of vibrating tongues, acted on by POINT, in perspective, that point in the a current of air from a sort of bellows, and horizontal line, where all lines parallel producing tones very similar to those of the among themselves meet the perspective organ. plane. Accidental colours depend on the ACCOUNTANT, or ACCOMPTANT, affections of the eye in contradistinction to in a general sense, denotes one whose bulight itself.

siness it is to compute, adjust, and range ACCIP'ITRES, the first order of birds, in due order accounts in commerce. In a

IN ACHROMATIC TELESCOPES, THE COLOURS OP REFRACTION ARE CORRECTED BY COMBINING GLASS LENSES OY DIFPERENT DISPKESIVE POWERS.

7

ACIDS AND ALKALIES, MIXED IN EQUAL PROPORTIONS, NEUTRALIZE EACH OTHER.

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