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ARTICLE XXIII.

If it should become necessary at any time to employ armed forces for the safety or protection of the Canal, or of the ships that make use of the same, or the railways and auxiliary works, the United States shall have the right, at all times and in its discretion, to use its police and its land and naval forces or to establish fortifications for these purposes.

ARTICLE XXIV.

No change either in the Government or in the laws and treaties of the Republic of Panama shall, without the consent of the United States, affect any right of the United States under the present convention, or under any treaty stipulation between the two countries that now exists or may hereafter exist touching the subject matter of this convention.

If the Republic of Panama shall hereafter enter as a constituent into any other Government or into any union or confederation of states, so as to merge her sovereignty or independence in such Government, union or confederation, the rights of the United States under this convention shall not be in any respect lessened or impaired.

ARTICLE XXV.

For the better performance of the engagements of this convention and to the end of the efficient protection of the Canal and the preservation of its neutrality, the Government of the Republic of Panama will sell or lease to the United States lands adequate and necessary for naval or coaling stations on the Pacific Coast and on the western Caribbean Coast of the Republic at certain points to be agreed upon with the President of the United States.

ARTICLE XXVI.

This convention when signed by the Plenipotentiaries of the Contracting Parties shall be ratified by the respective Governments and the ratifications shall be exchanged at Washington at the earliest date possible.

In faith whereof the respective Plenipotentiaries have signed the present convention in duplicate and have hereunto affixed their respective seals.

Done at the City of Washington the 18th day of November in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and three.

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And whereas the said Convention has been duly ratified on both parts, and the ratifications of the two governments were exchanged in the City of Washington, on the twenty-sixth day of February, one thousand nine hundred and four;

Now, therefore, be it known that I, Theodore Roosevelt, President of the United States of America, have caused the said Convention to be made public, to the end that the same and every article and clause thereof, may be observed and fulfilled with good faith by the United States and the citizens thereof.

In testimony whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States of America to be affixed.

Done at the City of Washington, this twenty-sixth day of February, in the year of our Lord one thousand nine hundred and four, and of the Independence of the United States the one hundred and twenty-eighth.

[SEAL]

By the President:

JOHN HAY,

THEODORE ROOSEVELT.

Secretary of State.

Protocol of an agreement between the United States and Panama regarding neutrality, signed at

Washington, October 10, 1914.

Protocol of an agreement concluded between Honorable Robert Lansing, Acting Secretary of State of the United States, and Don Eusebio A. Morales, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary of the Republic of Panama, signed the tenth day of October, 1914.

The undersigned, the Acting Secretary of State of the United States of America and the Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary of the Republic of Panama, in view of the close association of the interests of their respective Governments on the Isthmus of Panama, and to the end that these interests may be conserved and that, when a state of war exists, the neutral obligations of both Governments as neutrals may be maintained, after having conferred on the subject and being duly empowered by their respective Governments, have agreed:

That hospitality extended in the waters of the Republic of Panama to a belligerent vessel of war or a vessel belligerent or neutral, whether armed or not, which is employed by a belligerent power as a transport or fleet auxiliary or in any other way for the direct purpose of prosecuting or aiding hostilities, whether by land or sea, shall serve to deprive such vessel of like hospitality in the Panama Canal Zone for a period of three months, and vice versa. 37

In testimony whereof, the undersigned have signed and sealed the present Protocol in the city of Washington this tenth day of October, 1914.

ROBERT LANSING, (L. S.)
EUSEBIO A. MORALES (L. S.]

Convention between the United States and Panama, defining the boundary line

of the Panama Canal Zone. Signed at Panama, September 2, 1914; ratification advised by the Senate, October 22, 1914; ratified by the President, January 4, 1915; ratified by Panama, February 8, 1915; ratifications exchanged at Panama, February 11, 1915; proclaimed, February 18, 1915.

By the PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.

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A PROCLAMATION. Whereas a Convention between the United States of America and the Republic of Panama defining the boundary line of the Panama Canal Zone, was concluded and signed by their respective Plenipotentiaries at the City of Panama on the second day of September, one thousand nine hundred and fourteen, the original of which Convention, being in the English and Spanish languages, is word for word as follows:

BOUNDARY CONVENTION.28

Whereas, Gen. George W. Davis, then Governor of the Canal Zone, on behalf of the United States of America, and Messrs. Tomás Ariás and Ramón Valdés López, then Secretary of Foreign Affairs and Attorney General, respectively, of the Republic of Panama, acting on behalf of that Republic, entered into an agreement on the 15th day of June, 1904, by the terms of which the Republic of Panama delivered over to the United States of America, the use, occupation, and control in perpetuity of the zone of land ten miles in width described and mentioned in articles II and III of the Canal treaty between the United States of America and the Republic of Panama, dated November 18, 1903, and the boundary lines of said zone, as well as those of the cities of Panama and Colon and their adjacent harbors, were subsequently located upon the ground and monumented:

And, whereas, the President of the Republic of Panama, by decree number 46 of May 17, 1912, delivered over to the United States the use, occupation, and control of the areas of land to be covered by the waters of Lake Gatun and all that part of the shores of the lake up to an elevation of one hundred feet above sea level, in conformity with articles II and III of said Canal Treaty:

And whereas, since the promulgation of said decree of May 17, 1912, the l'nited States, in conformity with the said articles of said Treaty, have taken over the use, occupation, and control of the islands in said Lake Gatun and the peninsulas bordering on said lake to which there is no access except from said lake or from lands within the jurisdiction of the Canal Zone;

Now, therefore, the Government of the United States and the Republic of Panama being desirous to establish permanently the boundary lines of the above-mentioned lands and waters so taken over by the United States, to that end have resolved to enter into the following agreement, for which purpose the President of the United States of America has commissioned His Excellency William Jennings Price, Envoy

" See secs. 3-5. Art. III. p. 17 (Hay-Pauncefote Treaty) relative to use of Canal by vessels of belliger. ents, and neutrality proclamation of Nov. 13, 1914 (E. 6. 203). on same subject.

See notes under Arts. II-III, pp. 18 19.

Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary of the United States to the Government of Panama, and the President of the Republic of Panama has commissioned His Excellency Ernesto T. Lefevre, Secretary of State in the office of Foreign Affairs of the Republic of Panama, who, having exchanged their respective full powers, have entered into the following boundary convention:

I.

It is agreed that the boundary lines of the zone of land of ten miles in width described in article II of the said Canal Treaty shall remain as defined and established by the agreement of June the 15th, 1904, 29 above mentioned, and subsequently located on the ground and monumented as shown by exhibit “A” accompanying this Convention, with the modifications hereinafter set out in respect to the cities of Panama and Colon and their adjacent harbors.

II.

In conformity with articles II and III of said Treaty the rights of the United States to the use, occupation, and control of the areas to be covered by the waters of Gatun Lake and all that part of the shores of the lake up to an elevation of one hundred feet above mean sea level, and the islands in said lake, is hereby recognized, and in like manner the right of the United States to the use, occupation, and control of the peninsulas bordering on said lake to which there is no access except over lands of the Canal Zone or from the waters of Gatun Lake, is hereby recognized.

The one hundred feet contour line above referred to, as well as the peninsulas above mentioned, shall be conveniently monumented and marked upon the ground by the United States, with the intervention of a representative or representatives of the Republic of Panama designated for that purpose, and sketched upon a special map.

III.

It is agreed that the permanent boundary line between the City of Panama and the Canal Zone shall be as follows:

Beginning at a concrete monument located above high water mark on the shore of Panama Bay, south of the Balboa Road on the slope of the headland called "Punta Mala," and north thirty-two degrees and thirty minutes west (N. 32° 30' W.) and one hundred and fifty (150) meters from about the center of an island called "Gavilan."

From the above concrete monument (marked “A” on the map) the boundary line runs north twenty degrees and two minutes east (N. 20° 2' E.) six hundred and thirty-three and seven-tenths (633.7) meters to a concrete monument (marked "B" on the map) located at the intersection of the easterly line of the Zone boundary road, and the northerly line of the road leading from Panama to Balboa; thence north thirty-six degrees and forty-two minutes east (N. 36° 42' E.) nine hundred and sixty-six and eighty-five hundredths (966.85) meters to a concrete monument (marked "C" on the map) on the northerly side of the road leading to Ancon Hospital grounds; thence north three degrees and nineteen minutes east (N. 3° 19'. E.) one hundred and forty-eight and forty-six one-hundredths (148.46) meters to an iron rail property monument; thence north eight degrees and fourteen minutes, and forty seconds west (N. 8° 14' 40" W.) one hundred and fifty-one and thirty-three onehundredths meters (151.33) to a point; thence north thirty-seven degrees and fortyfive minutes east (N. 37° 45' E.) fourteen and thirty-three one-hundredths meters to a point in the road on the present boundary line; thence along said present boundary north no degree and forty-seven minutes west (N. 0° 47' W.) sixty-six and forty-four one-hundredths meters (66.44) to a point; thence north seventy-six degrees and fiftynine minutes east (N. 76° 59' E.) forty-two and forty-five one-hundredths (42.45) meters to a point; thence south seventy-two degrees and eleven minutes east (S. 72° 11' E) one hundred and fifty-nine and twenty-seven one-hundredths (159.27) meters to a point near Calidonia Bridge; thence north three degrees and eight minutes east (N. 3° 8' E.) crossing the Panama Railroad Company's tracks, seventy-seven and three-tenths (77.3) meters to a point twelve and two-tenths (12.2) meters from the center line of the main track of the said Panama Railroad; thence parallel to the said railroad in a north-westerly direction, two hundred and ninety and five-tenths

* The boundary limits as defined in the Davis Agreement were subsequently modified as to Panama Harbor by sec. 5 of the Taft Agreement (E. O. 29).

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(290.5) meters to a point on the present boundary line; thence north forty-nine degrees, thirteen minutes and ten seconds west (N. 49° 13' 10" W.) and one hundred and sixty-five and thirty-seven one-hundredths (165.37) meters to an iron rail monument, twelve and three-tenths meters from the center of the main line track of the Panama Railroad; thence north forty-six degrees, thirty-nine minutes and thirty seconds west (N. 46° 39' 30" W.) two hundred and twenty and four onehundredths (220.04) meters to a Panama Railroad boundary monument twentytwo and one-tenth (22.1) meters from the center line of Panama Railroad main line track; thence north forty-nine degrees and fourteen minutes west (N. 49° 14' W.) and parallel with the Panama Railroad track two hundred and ninety and thirty-six one-hundredths (290.36) meters to Rio Curundu; thence following the course of Rio Curundu upstream to a point (marked "E" on the map) where the said Rio Curundu is intersected by a straight line drawn through the point of intersection on the canal axis (marked "Cocoli" on the map) perpendicular to that part of the Canal axis of A. D. 1906 which extends in a straight line southeasterly from the said point marked "Cocoli" to the point of intersection (marked "Bay" on the map) the former point of intersection being situated between Miraflores and Corozal, and the latter point in Ancon Harbor; thence from "E" north sixty-three degrees and thirty minutes east (N. 63° 30' E.) two thousand and eight and six-tenths (2,008.6) meters to a concrete monument (marked "F" on the map) on the present boundary between the Canal Zone and the Republic of Panama; thence along this boundary south twenty-six degrees and thirty-four minutes east (S. 26° 34' E.) about four thousand seven hundred and forty-four and five-tenths (4,744.5) meters to monument No. 99 and thence continuing on this line to the shore of Panama Bayat low water mark; thence following the mean low water line around the shore of Panama Bay to a point on the boundary line between Panama Harbor and Ancon Harbor; thence north seventy-two degrees, fourteen minutes west (N. 72° 14' W.) to a monument "A," the point of beginning, except that the entire area of the middle island on the map called Las Tres Hermanas shall be under the jurisdiction of the United States of America.

Points "A," "B" and "C," above referred to, are the same points mentioned in the original agreement between the Government of the Republic of Panama and the Canal Zone Government, dated June 15, 1904.

All bearings in this description and on the map mentioned above are referred to true meridian and all coordinates are in accordance with the Panama-Colon Datum.

The Government of Panama agrees that the portion of the roadway now existing between the Ancon Post Office and the Tivoli Dispensary and connecting the Tivoli Road with the roads leading to Balboa and the Ancon Hospital grounds, which will fall within Panaman jurisdiction as a result of the boundary lines established in accordance with the foregoing description, will be kept open and of the same grade as same now is and will be maintained in good serviceable condition by the said Government of Panama so that it will afford a free, uninterrupted and unobstructed permanent public thoroughfare, unless in the future provided otherwise by the mutual agreement of the chief executive authorities of the Republic of Panama and the Panama Canal.

IV. It is agreed that the harbor of the City of Panama shall include the maritime waters in front of the City of Panama lying to the north and east of a line beginning at a concrete monument set on "Punta Mala” marked "A" on the map already referred to in this Convention, and running south seventy-two degrees and fourteen minutes east (S. 72° 14' E.) through the middle island of the three islands known as “Las Tres Hermanas,” but excluding the said middle island, and extending three marine miles from mean low water mark at Punta Mala; and that the harbor of Ancon shall include the waters lying south and west of said line, but including the said middle island which shall be deemed to be within the harbor of Ancon. The said middle island hereby included within the harbor of Ancon is situated about south twelve degrees, thirty minutes west (S. 12° 30' W.) eight hundred and fifty-six (856) meters from the point of Las Bovedas and lies in latitude north eight degrees, fifty-six minutes (N. 8° 56') plus one thousand and fifty-eight and eighty-eight hundredths (1,058.88) meters and longitude west seventy-nine degrees, thirty-two minutes (W. 79° 32') plus three hundred forty-two and six-tenths (342.6) meters, the datum of said latitude and longitude being what is generally known as the Panama-Colon Datum. All bearings are referred to true meridian.

The foregoing description of the City of Panama and Panama Harbor conform to the accompanying blue print marked exhibit "B."

V.

It is agreed that the permanent boundary line between the City of Colon and the Canal Zone shall be as follows:

Beginning at a point on the western shore of Boca Chica (sometimes called Folks River) marked "A" on the map, and fifty (50) meters to the eastward of the center line of the main line of track of the Panama Railroad; thence northward and northwestward, always parallel with said railroad track, and at a uniform distance of fifty (50) meters from the center line thereof to the center of Bolivar Street (sometimes called "C" street), said point being marked "B" on the map; thence northerly along the center line of said Bolivar Street, to the center line of Eleventh Street, this point of intersection being marked "C" on the map; thence westerly along the center line of Eleventh Street, a distance of one hundred sixty-two and fifty-three hundredths (162.53) meters to a cross on the sea wall along Limon Bay, said point being marked "D" on the map; thence north seventy-eight degrees, thirty minutes and thirty seconds west (N. 78° 30′ 30′′ W.) to the shore of Limon Bay at mean low water mark; thence following the mean low water line around the shore in a northerly, easterly, southerly, and westerly direction to the point of beginning, except that at the site of the old Colon lighthouse a detour is made, as shown on the map, to exclude an area of land to be used as the site for a United States battery, which site shall be deemed to be within the Canal Zone.

The site for a United States battery above mentioned, which is to be included within the jurisdiction of the Canal Zone, is described as follows:

The initial point is a tack in a stake on Colon point, situated with reference to certain prominent points as follows: South forty-one degrees, six minutes east (S. 41° 6' E.) twenty-five and twenty-two one-hundredths (25.22) feet from the southwest interior corner of the upper pavement of the swimming pool; south eleven degrees thirty-seven minutes west (S. 11° 37′ W.) one hundred twenty-seven and sixty-eight one-hundredths (127.68) feet from a cross mark on a bolt set in a concrete base thirteen and nine-tenths (13.9) feet to the northeast of the center of the northeastern edge of the swimming pool; south thirty-five degrees, eighteen minutes west (S. 35° 18' W.), two hundred sixty-six and seventy-five one-hundredths (266.75) fe t from the northwestern corner of the Hotel Washington; and north sixty-eight degrees, twenty-nine minutes west (N. 68° 29' W.), five hundred forty-three and ninety-five one-hundredths (543.95) feet from the cross mark on a rail set in a concrete base at a point where the south building line of Second Street intersects the center line of Bottle Alley; from this initial point south forty-three degrees, no minutes west (S. 43° 00′ W.), two hundred fifty-eight and five-tenths (258.5) feet to a point; thence north forty-seven degrees, no minutes west (N. 47° 00′ W.) ninety and sixty-four one-hundredths (90.64) feet to a point; thence by a curve to the right with a radius of fifty-six and eighty-six one-hundredths (56.86) feet and a central angle of fortyfive degrees, no minutes (45° 00′), forty-four and sixty-six one-hundredths (44.66) feet to a point; thence by a curve to the right with a radius of ninety-one (91) feet and a central angle of forty-five degrees, no minutes (45° 00′), seventy-one and fortyseven one-hundredths (71.47) feet to a point; thence north forty-three degrees, no minutes east (N. 43° 00′ E.), one hundred seventy-seven and five-tenths (177.5) feet to a point; thence south forty-seven degrees, no minutes east (S. 47° 00′ E.), one hundred fifty-seven and five-tenths (157.5) feet to the point of beginning, containing ninety-one one-hundredths (0.91) acres, more or less. All bearings are referred to true meridian (Panama-Colon Datum).

VI.

The harbor of Colon shall consist of those maritime waters lying to the westward of the City of Colon and bounded as follows:

The southerly boundary of the harbor of Colon is in a line running north seventyeight degrees, thirty minutes and thirty seconds west (N. 78° 30' 30" W.), which begins at a cross cut in the concrete sea wall on the easterly side of Limon Bay and on the center line of Eleventh Street, Colon, produced westerly. This point is marked "D" on the map designated exhibit "C." Beginning at mean low water mark on Limon Bay on the above described line the boundary runs northwesterly along said line to a point in Limon Bay marked "E" on the map, and located three hundred and thirty (330) meters east of the center line of the Panama Canal; thence turning to the right and running in a northerly direction the line runs parallel with the above mentioned center line and at a distance of three hundred and thirty (330) meters easterly therefrom until it meets an imaginary straight line drawn through the light

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