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much at their ease; and the whole man, on board a ship in th
seems to be intended as a burlesque would be investigated
upon the most solemn act, which a ralty courts; and the
creatore, like man, can execute. The ing him, or transpr.
consequences that have ensued, and out his consent, fro
which are likely to ensue, unless the other, is actional
place of execution is altered, are such blacks been der
as might have been expected, when from an ill-for
the curiosity or feelings of the pub- prejudice is
lic have been strongly excited. rejoice that,

In the House of Commons severa) their right
important subjects were discussed, but for
amongst them the Catholic Bill, the For an
Freehold Liability Bill, the Bill for ner in
the Abolition of the Slave Trade, and chan
the examination of witnesses in the sari,
case of the Electors of Westminster of
against Mr. Sheridan, were the most
important. Tle Slave Trade has
received its death blow. After twen.
ty years' agitation, the question is no
set at rest, and both Lords and Co
mons are agreed, that in this tradis
Englishman shall no longer ”
gaged. In this deci ion we F;
concur; not that we, by any
agree with the chief lends,
question, in the niode of

toility ing; and we carefully dis

ale freehold case of the slaves in ih

dying in debt, the situation of a black

Maynient of those debts. ship. The former ba

poct was most ablu introducer with the latter que

ArRonilly, the solicitor-general, it alter our opinion

dild opposed, legally and technicalls, carried by us int

we by che Master of the Rolls. The me do we place an

usition, rits of the question scarcely allow 1 tions of Mr. ;

Jout a divis one moment's discussion. Thornton, pa'

ordered to be man to defrau: his creditors, because tleman, res

a second time on his property is in land? Some excepthe blacks

Alter various tions, in a bill of this kind, might be question

Howick, on the 18th made in favour of the peerage, but Houses talked

5:21Ch, informed the House, dishonesty is not to be encouraged. Sertain circumsancts had inter- We have no doubt that a bill of this subje

pay, rendering a postponement of kind will tinally pass, though on the

bill necessary. He was aware, third readi!g of the present bil, sixtyhar

ellvo require some explanation. only for it. We should reconurend, i was not authorised, if present, to that previously, to the next attempt

The bill would of course to recommend honesty, and to slipout he could not say when it port te industrious against the kinase, De indolence of the House till that manner in which persons of landed Dirild be lerived; but he hop.d for that an account be drawn up of the sneni sbouki arrive, for which he property bare cheated their creditors, is as in Sintis 35 any person, when and to what extent within the last ten be noig!! tumunicate the necessary years, from which the necessity of

the bill will be evident to all, except On ibo 23d, a petition was pre- those who wish to cheat their cridischied visi ile bill, from the Uni- tors.

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APOLLONIAN CRITIC.

" SEMPER FIDELIS." n's Musical Ca- songs, sequels, &c. &c. are too often Vocket Library, found to contain a sort of echo to the

Violin, and original, but freyuently wholly destithe Flageo- tute of its merit; and not seldom, by 'ce 2s. 6d. means of a similar frontispiece or

title page, intended as a catchpenny, tiscel- and by the public to be mistaken for 'itle. the original publication. Braham's ne; song, which gave rise to the present

article, has been very popular; and this has given rise to a number of imitions. The one now before us is ‘te in the usual ti tum ti stile, and othing extraordinary to recom

2.

257

own tree- of Calabria.
State of Public Affairs.

truite it in the appointment

v tre in it, the government
..??st be gradual. the benetit ot ile ac!, was testified
10w granied by the shores of Egypt, and the plains

; if any danger could be appre

11 1,5 proposed also

*** IN W. (Hunisterit ch deliberation, and That the country load already received

leikrit to admit Catholics into the ar

30 dpemilied only the executive govern-
Setting rid of it in the House of Commons of Ireland.

istite the use of

1:1,
The proposed measure

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Noir de Musique; or,
Pastimes,-being Games

constituted on the Prinses of Music. By Thomas Dan. vers Worgan.

Any rational attempt to render of its amusement subservient to promote se musical the attainment of science must be -.ent one, and, highly commendable. In the little ne work will prove work now before us, Mr. W. has mayuisition to those who nifested a considerable degree of in

sess a pleasing variety of genuity; although, for ourselves, we at a small expense. The two must confess, that we prefer the viumes before us contain a great straight forward road of instruction; number of excellent songs (with the and we very much query, whether words) for one and two voices, or those who are fond of card-playing in instruments ; also, a number of po- the usual way will so far deviate from polar country dances, waltzes, &c. their accustomed method of amuseThe music is adapted professedly for ment, as to pay sufficient attention to the German Aute and Aageolet, but the author's plan of connecting music will equally well suit for violins or with the game. We think, a pack of hautboys. As far as we can judge from cards with musical characters, beginwhat we have already seen, we are in- ning with very simple, and gradually clined sincerely to recommend this proceeding to the more difficult parts Deat little cabinet of music, and to of the science, would more effectually wish the publishers much success. answer the purpose.

After all, we We shall continue to potice the vo- are willing to allow the author some lumes occasionally, as they make their merit; and we think, was he to introappearance.

2. duce a few more lessons, and those That a Smile and a Tear,"—written printed on half a dozen cards, it

expressly as an Answer to the cele- would be a considerable improvebrated song, “Said the Smile to ment.

2. the Tear," as sung by Mr. Braham, at the Theatre-Royal, Drury-Lane.

Å Recreation,"--composed of a The music with an Accompaniment Scene, or Introduction, an Aria, for the Piano Forte. By W. F. and a Rondo, for the Piano Forte, Crouch. Price Is. 6d.

with an Accompaniment for the We confess that, generally speaking, German Flute. Dedicated to Miss we are far from being friendly to pub- Caroline Cole, of Bath. By Louis lications of this sort. Answers to Von Esch. 5s. UNIVERSAL MAG. Vol. VII.

2 A1

upon us by these concessions, must versity of Cambridge, which excited be speedily stopped, or, it sutierec 10 Mir. Dickenson to ingaire of Lord increase, that would ultimately be Howick, wheiher he was prepared extorted from the weakness of par. to enter into an ciplanation of the Jiment which is wisdom would be causes which delaved the progress desirous to withhold.

of the bill; and also to inform the Lord Temple thought the opinions 11.00 whether the runours were of the preceding speaker avourer weil founded, that the ministers had mole of the dark djes, than of the pressed upon the king à measure to prest'nii enlightened times. The which he felt an invincible aver-ion. matness of intolerance was now uni- Lord Howick in reply, observed, that vervally comessed: and be would he was not af liberty, at that mo. enter his solenın proieit against the ment, to a swer the question, wheverival of all those intolerant bigotries ther the ministers bad endevoured which produce narrow-ninded po- to forre the measure upon hii, Majesliey in government, and a dangerous ty, when they knew his conscience division among the people. Mr. could not agree to it.

He must Yorke coineived that some limits throw himself, for the present, upon must be put to the daily innovations the indulgence of the House : and he on the church establishment. In this could state only, that he had not rehe was joined by Mr. Montague, u ho ceived his Majesty's con manis to deprovoked much laughter in the House, liver up the seats of cilice, but that by leis absurdity in supposing, that our he understood that his Majesty was séamen, if the bill were admitted, now employed with certain persons, would, instead of beating the enemy, in arranging a new administration. fall to disputes between themselves The administration was equally unahout religion. Mr. Corry approved fortunate in the Irechold Liability of the bill, as it wouli restore to our Lill--a bill to render the freehold service the talents and courage of the property of persons dying in debt, Dillons of France, and the Reillys assets for the paynient of those debts. of Spain--iren who were the support The subject was most ably introduced and ornaments of a foreign service. by Mr. Roniilly, the solicitor-general, Lord Ffowick summed up in a very and opposed, legally and technicalis, masterly manner, answering all the by the Master of the Rolls. The mearguments against his proposition, rits of the question scarcely allow which was agreed to without a divi- one moinent's discussion. Why is a sion ; ancı ile bill was ordered to be man to defraud his creditors, because printed, and read a second time on his property is in land: Some excepthat day se'nnight. Aiter various tions, in a bill of this kind, might be delays Lord Howick, on the 18th made in favour of the peerage, but day of Marchi, informed the House, dishonesty is not to be encouraged. that certain circumstances had inter- We have no doubt that a bill of this vened, rendering a postponement of kind will finally pass, though on the the bill vecessary. He was aware, third reading of the present bill, sixiythat the House and the public would nine were against it, and forty-seven naturally require some explanation. only for it. We should recommend, He was not authorised, at present, to that previously to the next atiempt give it.

The bill would of course to recommend honesty, and to supdrop, and he could not say when it port the industrious against the knase, would lic revived; but he hop d for that an account be drawn up of the the indulgence of the House fill ihat manner in which persons of landed moment should arrive, for which he property hufe cheated their creditors, Vis as assivtis as any person, when and to what extent within the last ten be might coaimunicate the necessary years, from which the necessity of eaulamation,

the bil will be evident to all, except Da ibe 23d, a petition was pre- those who wish to cheat their crid:scried horisost che bill, from the Uni- tors.

APOLLONIAN CRITIC.

SEMPER FIDELIS.” Purday and Button's Musical Ca- songs, sequels, &c. &c. are too often

binet, or, Complete Pocket Library, found to contain a sorl of echo to the for the German Flute, Violin, and original, but frequently wholly desti. Oboe ; adapted also for the Flageo- tute of its merit; and not seldom, by let.” Vols. 1. and 2. Price 2s. Od. means of a similar frontispiece or each.

title page, intended as a catchpenny, THE plan of this Musical Miscel- and by the public to be mistaken for page, is most certainly a good one; song, which gave rise to the present by which it appears, that the work article, has been very popular; and is to consist of four volumes of select this has given rise to a number of imisongs and dances; two volumes of tations. The one now before us is duets and trios; two volumes of the quite in the usual ti tum ti stile, and most favorite Scotch, Irish, and has nothing extraordinary to recomWelch airs, arranged as duels; two mend it.

2. volumes of marches; and two volumes of the most popular airs, &c. in sacred Rouge et Noir de Musique; or, music, arranged as before. The wbole Harmonic Pastimes,-being Games to be completed in twelve monthly of Cards, constituted on the Prinvolumes, and at a price which appears ciples of Music. By Thomas Dan. to us to be very moderate. We have vers Worgan. been thus particular in noticing this Any rational attempt to render work, on account of the extent of its amusement subservient to promote plan The plan of this little musical the attainment of science must be lihrary is a most excellent one, and, highly compiendable. In the little if well conducted, the work will prove work now before us, Mr. W. has maa valuable acquisition to those who nifested a considerable degree of inwish to possess a pleasing variety of genuity; although, for ourselves, we music at a small expense. The two must confess, that we prefer the volumes before us contain a great straight forward road of instruction; number of excellent songs (with the and we very much query, whether words) for one and two voices, or those who are fond of card-playing in instruments ; also, a number of po- the usual way will so far deviate from polar country dances, waltzes, &c. their accustomed method of amuseThe music is adapted professedly for ment, as to pay sufficient attention to the German flute and Aageolet, but the author's plan of connecting music will equally well suit for violins or with the game. We think, a pack of hautboys. As far as we can judge from cards with musical characters, beginwhat we have already seen, we are in- ning with very simple, and gradually clined sincerely to recommend this proceeding to the more difficult parts beat little cabinet of music, and to of the science, would more effectually wish the publishers much success, answer the purpose. After all, we We shall continue to notice the vo- are willing to allow the author some lumes occasionally, as they make their merit; and we think, was he to introappearance.

z. duce a few more lessons, and those That a Smile and a Tear,"--written printed on half a dozen cards, it expressly as an Answer to the cele- would be a considerable improve• Said the Smile to ment.

2. the Tear," as sung by Mr. Braham, at the Theatre-Royal, Drury-Lane. “ Å Recreation,"—-composed of a The music with an Accompaniment Scene, or Introduction, an Aria, for the Piano Forte. By W. F. and a Rondo, for the Piano Forte, Crouch. Price 1s. 6d.

with an Accompaniment for the Weconfess that, generally speaking, German Flute. Dedicated to Miss we are far from being friendly to pub- Caroline Cole, of Bath. By Louis lications of this sort.

brated song,

Answers to Von Esch. 5s. UNIVERSAL MAG. VOL. VII.

2 MI

In the compositions of Mr. Von least valuable part of thie performance. Esch we find 'uniter, what alas ! in In praise of the second, or aria andanthe fallen state of music in these de- tino, we cannot express ourselves too generate days we seldom dlo, GENIUS highly. Mozart himself never proand taste; and it is to the possession duced a finer slow movement; while of these rare faculties, added to what the rondo evinces all that exquisite is no less rare, viz. an accurate know- taste, and brilliancy of fancy, for ledye of the science, that he is in- which the lighter works of Plevel debted for the uncommon share of have been so long and justly celepopularity which his musical works brated. In a word, had Mr. Von experierce.

Esch never published any other work That such works should be popular than this “Recreation," his name is highly gratifying to us, as, by that would not have been soon forgotten. popularity, we are convinced, that We cannot clos this article with. the public taste is not yet entirely out, in justice, paying our tribute of vitiated by those miserable musical approbation to the publishers, Messrs. cooks, who have lately served up the Purday and Button, for the elegant operatical dishes at our winter theatres. style in which they have published

Of the work before us, we are bappy this work. The neatness and accuto speak in the highest terms of admi- racy of the engraving, beauty of the ration; we think it one of the inost paper, and taste of the embellishmasterly productions that has pro- ments, do them great credit. T. ceeded from the pen of this excellent ['The brevity of the "Apollonian composer. It consists of three move- Critic," this month, has been occaments, an allegro moderato, a rondo sioned by the indisposition of one of allegretto in 6-8 time, and an aria an- its writers; which, also, is the cause dantino in common time. The first of the conclusion of the Review of part or scene, though evidently the Dr. Calcott's Grammar being postmost laboured, is nevertheless the poned till next month.]

מן

TO CORRESPONDENTS. MR. BARTHELEMON's communication respecting the Clariole, in answer to Mr. PRATT, caine too late for insertion in the present Number; but it shall appear in our next.

VELLEIUS PROFUTURUS, and AMATOR LIBERTATIS, will be gratified by finding their communications in our Magazine for April next. We have been compelled to defer the insertion of several literary favours, owing to the great press of the materials designed for the latter portion of our current number.

A“Defence of Gambier's Moral Evidence” is under consideration. In the same predicament, with us, remains the “ Address to the Free Masons of Durham.”

It is always painful to us, when we feel ourselves under the necessity of disappointing the wishes of any one of our friendly contributors; but there are reasons which induce us to decline the publication of a “Reply to the Strictures on a paper, entitled, “The Oppression of Employers.'”

" Have we met to meet no more?" asks the author of lines called “ The Partixg?" To this interrogatory, we fear we must answer—Yes!

Correct the Press in the last Numher.
Page 143, 2d columii, for continued read contained.
Page 145, 2d column, for my tito hundred, dele my.
Page 146, line 2, for to the, read to his.

BOOKS PUBLISHED MARCH 1807. 67 As this Department will be of great Importance to AUTHORS and

BOOKSELLERS, as well as to Literature in general, it is requested that Notices of Works may be forwarded as early as possible (free of Postage), which will be regularly inserted.

BIOGRAPHY.

Writings of the Ilon. H. Home, of Literature, and Improvement in of Kaimes, one of the Lords Com- Scotland, during the greater part of missioners of Justiciary in Scotland: the 18th century. By A. F. Tytler,

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