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ment, defining clearly the matter in dispute, the scope of the powers of the arbitrators, and the periods to be fixed for the formation of the arbitral tribunal and the several stages of the procedure. It is understood that on the part of the United States such special agreements will be made by the president of the United States, by and with the advice and consent of the senate thereof, and on the part of Costa Rica shall be subject to the procedure required by the constitution and laws thereof.

ARTICLE III.

The present convention is concluded for a period of five years, and shall remain in force thereafter until one year's notice of termination shall be given by either party.

ARTICLE IV.

The present convention shall be ratified by the president of the United States of America, by and with the advice and consent of the senate thereof; and by the president of Costa Rica in accordance with the constitution and laws thereof. The ratifications shall be exchanged at Washington as soon as possible, and the Convention shall take effect on the date of the exchange of its ratifications.

Done in duplicate in the English and Spanish languages at Washington, this 13th day of January, in the year one thousand nine hundred and nine.

[SEAL]
[SEAL]

ELIHU ROOT.

J. B. CALVO.

CONVENTION BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES AND GERMANY CONCERNING

PATENTS.1

Signed at Washington, February 23, 1909; Ratified by the President, April 20, 1909; Proclaimed, August 1, 1909.

The president of the United States of America and his majesty the German Emperor, King of Prussia, in the name of the German Empire, led by the wish to effect a full and more operative reciprocal protection

1 U. S. Treaty Series, No. 531.

of patents, designs, working patterns, and models in the two countries, have decided to conclude an agreement for that purpose and have appointed as their plenipotentiaries:

The president of the United States of America, Mr. Robert Bacon, Secretary of State of the United States; and

His majesty the German Emperor, King of Prussia, His Excellency Count von Bernstorff, His Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary to the United States;

Who, after having communicated each to the other their respective full powers, found to be in good and due form, have agreed to the following articles:

ARTICLE I.

The provisions of the laws applicable, now existing or hereafter to be enacted of either of the contracting parties, under which the nonworking of the patent, working pattern (Gebrauchsmuster), design or model carries the invalidation or some other restriction of the right, shall only be applied to the patents, working patterns (Gebrauchsmuster), designs or models enjoyed by the citizens of the other contracting party within the limits of the restrictions imposed by the said party upon its own citizens. The working of a patent, working pattern (Gebrauchsmuster), design or model in the territory of one of the contracting parties shall be considered as equivalent to its working in the territory of the other party.

ARTICLE II.

This agreement shall take effect from the date of its promulgation and remain in force until the expiration of 12 months following the notice of termination given by one of the contracting parties.

ARTICLE III.

The present agreement shall be ratified and the ratifications shall be exchanged at Washington as soon as possible.

In witness whereof the respective plenipotentiaries have executed the present agreement and affixed their seals thereunto.

Done in duplicate in the English and German languages at Washington this 23rd day of February, 1909.

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ARBITRATION CONVENTION BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES AND PERU.1 Signed at Washington, December 5, 1908; Ratified by the President, March 1, 1909; Proclaimed, June 30, 1909.

The Government of the United States of America, signatory of the two conventions for the pacific settlement of international disputes, concluded at The Hague, respectively, on July 29, 1899, and October 18, 1907, and the government of the republic of Peru, adherent to the said convention of July 29, 1899, and signatory of the said convention of October 18, 1907;

Taking into consideration that by article XIX of the convention of July 29, 1899, and by article XL of the convention of October 18, 1907, the high contracting parties have reserved to themselves the right of concluding argreements, with a view to referring to arbitration all questions which they shall consider possible to submit to such treatment;

Have authorized the undersigned to conclude the following convention:

ARTICLE I.

Differences which may arise of a legal nature, or relating to the interpretation of treaties existing between the two contracting parties, and which it may not have been possible to settle by diplomacy, shall be referred to the Permanent Court of Arbitration established at The Hague by the convention of the 29th July, 1899, for the pacific settlement of international disputes, and maintained by The Hague Convention of the 18th October, 1907; provided, nevertheless, that they do not affect the vital interests, the independence, or the honor of the two contracting states, and do not concern the interests of third parties.

ARTICLE II.

In each individual case the high contracting parties, before appealing to the Permanent Court of Arbitration, shall conclude a special agreement, defining clearly the matter in dispute, the scope of the powers of the arbitrators, and the periods to be fixed for the formation of the arbitral tribunal and the several stages of the procedure. It is understood.

1 U. S. Treaty Series, No. 528. This treaty and those with Salvador, December 21, 1908; and Costa Rica, January 13, 1909, printed herewith, continue the series of arbitration treaties appearing in the SUPPLEMENT to this JOURNAL, 2:296-303, 330-336; and also 3:221.

that on the part of the United States such special agreements will be made by the president of the United States, by and with the advice and consent of the senate thereof, and on the part of Peru shall be subject to the procedure required by the constitution and laws thereof.

ARTICLE III.

The present convention is concluded for a period of five years and shall remain in force thereafter until one year's notice of termination shall be given by either party.

ARTICLE IV.

The present convention shall be ratified by the president of the United States of America, by and with the advice and consent of the senate thereof; and by the president of Peru in accordance with the constitution and laws thereof. The ratifications shall be exchanged at Washington as soon as possible, and the convention shall take effect on the date of the exchange of its ratifications.

Done in duplicate in the English and Spanish languages at Washington, this 5th day of December, in the year one thousand nine hundred and eight.

[SEAL]
[SEAL]

ELIHU ROOT.
FELIPE PARDO.

AGREEMENT BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES AND RUSSIA REGULATING THE POSITION OF CORPORATIONS AND OTHER COMMERCIAL ASSOCIATIONS.1

Signed at St. Petersburg, June 25/12, 1904; Ratified by the President, June 7, 1909; Proclaimed, June 15, 1909.

The government of the United States and the Imperial Russian government having judged that it would be mutually useful to regulate the position of corporations or stock companies and other commercial associations, industrial or financial, the undersigned, by virtue of the authority which has been vested in them, have agreed as follows:

1. Corporations or stock companies, and other industrial or financial commercial organizations, domiciled in one of the two countries, and on

1 U. S. Treaty Series, No. 526.

the condition that they have been regularly organized in conformity to the laws in force in that country, shall be recognized as having a legal existence in the other country, and shall have therein especially the right to appear before the courts, whether for the purpose of bringing an action or of defending themselves against one.

2. In all cases the said corporations and companies shall enjoy in the other country the same rights which are or may be granted to similar companies of other countries.

3. It is understood that the foregoing stipulation or agreement has no bearing upon the question whether a society or corporation organized in one of the two countries will or will not be permitted to transact its business or industry in the other, this permission remaining always subject to the regulations in this respect existing in the latter country.

This agreement shall go into force on the 25/12 of June 1904, and shall only be discontinued one year after its denunciation shall have been made by one of the parties to the agreement.

Made in duplicate at St. Petersburg, the 25/12 day of June 1904. COUNT LAMsdorff.

[SEAL]

ROBERT S. MCCORMICK. [SEAL]

ARBITRATION CONVENTION BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES AND SALVADOR.1 Signed at Washington, December 21, 1908; Ratified by the President, March 1, 1909; Proclaimed, July 7, 1909.

The government of the United States of America, signatory of the two conventions for the pacific settlement of international disputes, concluded at The Hague, respectively, on July 29, 1899, and October 18, 1907, and the government of the republic of Salvador, adherent to the said convention of July 29, 1899, and signatory of the said convention of October 18, 1907;

Taking into consideration that by article XIX of the convention of July 29, 1899, and by article XL of the convention of October 18. 1907, the high contracting parties have reserved to themselves the right of concluding agreements, with a view to referring to arbitration all questions which they shall consider possible to submit to such treatment;

Have authorized the undersigned to conclude the following convention:

1 U. S. Treaty Series, No. 529.

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