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In the first district, between Pedro Miguel Locks and the sea, there were removed 5,364,816 cubic yards, of which 3,329,072 cubic yards were taken from within the canal prism and the balance was auxiliary work. Of the amount removed from within the canal prism, 1,186,432 cubic yards were of rock. Of the rock excavated, 146,477 cubic yards were drilled and blasted by the drill barge Teredo and 60,832 cubic yards were broken by the rock breaker Vulcan. The remainder includes rock which had been drilled by well drills and blasted in previous years and material which could be handled by the dredges without mining. The average cost of prism excavation was $0.2578 per cubic yard. Active operations began in Culebra Cut on October 23, 1913, and continued throughout the year; a total of 3,432,363 cubic yards were removed, of which 919,655 cubic yards were of earth and the balance rock. The average cost was $0.5194 per cubic yard. Of this amount, 865,015 cubic yards of earth and 1,557,360 cubic yards of rock were removed from Cucaracha slide, at an average cost of $0.4730 per cubic yard. Pipe-line dredges, with the assistance of a relay, pumped over the west bank of the canal into the Rio Grande Valley 684,514 cubic yards of earth and 77,880 cubic yards of rock, at an average cost of $0.2773 per cubic yard. Cucaracha slide has been very active since dredging operations started, the daily movement averaging about 24 feet. On June 30, 1914, the total area of the slide was 60.4 acres, 44.6 acres active and 15.8 acres without motion. Dredging was done during four months of the year in Miraflores Lake, removing 159,817 cubic yards of earth from the canal prism, at an average cost of $0.3179 per cubic yard.

In the second district 6,544,192 cubic yards were removed during the year, of which 3,692,576 cubic yards were removed from within the canal prism, 574,630 cubic yards from old French dump in Limon Bay, and the balance was auxiliary work. The average cost of prism and French dump dredging was $0.1717 per cubic yard. Of the amount removed from the canal prism, 158,994 cubic yards were of rock. Of the total amount taken out, there were removed between October, 1913, and February, 1914, 507,195 cubic yards of earth and 5,035 cubic yards of rock from the canal prism just north of Gamboa, from what was formerly known as Point No. 1.

In connection with the Atlantic terminals the dredges removed 18,286 cubic yards of earth and 16,015 cubic yards of rock from the site of the bridge crossing the French canal south of the dry dock, 117,289 cubic yards of earth from the approach channel, 275,993 cubic yards of earth and 46,360 cubic yards of rock from the new Piers Nos. 7, 8, and 9, and 181,709 cubic yards of earth and 213,325 cubic yards of rock from the coaling station. The average cost of excavation at these terminals was $0.3646 per cubic yard. Seventeen

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SCOWS.

2 first district, between Pedro Miguel Locks and the sea, the thousand cubic yards were placed in the fill for the substation and moved 5,364,816 cubic yards, of which 3,329,072 cubic ya 304,411 cubic yards were placed in fills for bridge foundations, coal ken from within the canal prism and the balance was au

basins, and yards at the coaling station. ork. Of the amount removed from within the canal pris

At the Pacific terminals the dredges removed 1,919,003 cubic yards 2 cubic yards were of rock. Of the rock excavated, 146,67 of earth and 7,964 cubic yards of rock, of which 1,831,711 cubic yards rds were drilled and blasted by the drill barge Teredo of earth were handled by pipe-line dredges and relays and placed in ubic yards were broken by the rock breaker Vulcan. T. fills for reclaiming swamp land. The average cost of this work was er includes rock which had been drilled by well drills 2: $0.1655 per cubic yard. in previous years and material which could be handled by t A considerable amount of miscellaneous dredging was also done, without mining. The average cost of prism excavation making the total removed by the entire dredging fleet, including per cubic yard. Active operations began in Culebra Cut e yardage of sand and gravel reclaimed, 15,341,371 cubic yards. The 23, 1913, and continued throughout the year; total

fleet consisted of the seagoing suction dredges Caribbean and Culebra, 3 cubic yards were removed, of which 919,655 cubic par: the seagoing ladder dredge Corozal, the French ladder dredges earth and the balance rock. The average cost was $0.12 Badger, No. 1, No. 5, Gopher, Marmot, and Mole (the last abandoned c yard. Of this amount, 865,015 cubic yards of earth as worn out on September 20, 1913), the 5-yard dipper dredges

cubic yards of rock were removed from Cucaracha slide Cardenas, Chagres, and Mindi, the 15-yard dipper dredges Gamboa ge cost of $0.4730 per cubic yard. Pipe-line dredges, with t and Paraiso, and the pipe-line suction dredges No. 4, No. 82, No. 83, e of a relay, pumped over the west bank of the canal intot

No. 85, No. 86, and the Sandpiper. In connection with these dredges nde Valley 684,514 cubic yards of earth and 77,880 ct there were employed 12 tugs, 19 launches, 9 clapets, and 24 dump

rock, at an average cost of $0.2773 per cubic yard. Cuz de has been very active since dredging operations starta As noted in the previous annual report, a contract was made with 1 movement averaging about 24 feet. On June 30, 1914, 0 the Bucyrus Co. for the construction of two 15-yard dipper dredges a of the slide was 60.4 acres, 44.6 acres active and 15.8 ac and their delivery at tidewater in the United States. The first was motion. Dredging was done during four months of the se to be ready for towing to the Isthmus on December 1, 1913, and the lores Lake, removing 159,817 cubic yards of earth from ! second on January 1, 1914. The first dredge was accepted at Port sm, at an average cost of $0.3179 per cubic yard. Richmond, N. Y., on February 16, reached the Isthmus on March second district 6,544,192 cubic yards were removed dur: 16, and was placed in operation on April 4, 1914. The second dredge of which 3,692,576 cubic yards were removed from wit

was accepted at Port Richmond on April 13, reached the Isthmus prism, 574,630 cubic yards from old French dump in Lim on May 22, and went into commission at Cucaracha slide on June the balance was auxiliary work. The average cost of pre 7; 1914. Due to a failure of the buckets

, which were not suffinch dump dredging was $0.1717 per cubic yard. Of e ciently strong to do the work, an additional delay was caused. The removed from the canal prism, 158,994 cubic yards failure to meet the stipulated dates of delivery resulted in very serif the total amount taken out, there were removed betre ously handicapping the work at Cucaracha slide and delayed secur1913, and February, 1914, 507,195 cubic yards of earthe ing a channel sufficiently deep and wide to permit the canal to be -c yards of rock from the canal prism just north of Gazi. utilized for the passage of commerce before the close of the year. t was formerly known as Point No. 1.

The sum of $2,000 was authorized to be expended in the construcnection with the Atlantic terminals the dredges remi" tion of temporary dikes on the west side of the channel where it is pic yards of earth and 16,015 cubic yards of rock from cut through at the head of Limon Bay, to determine the effect upon 2 bridge crossing the French canal south of the dry

erosion that was occurring, due to the waves created by the trade ubic yards of earth from the approach channel

, 27

winds. The results were so satisfactory that it has been decided to ds of earth and 46,360 cubic yards of rock from the mos - 7, 8, and 9, and 181,709 cubic yards of earth and 24

For further particulars, attention is invited to Appendix C. at these terminals was $0.3646 per cubic yard. Serezie, Is of rock from the coaling station. The average cost of a

wer

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make these dikes permanent.

633999--14----3

MECHANICAL DIVISION.

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The mechanical division was in charge of Mr. A. L. Robinson until July 19, 1913, when he resigned from the service. Subsequent to that date and until March 6, 1914, Lieut. Col. T. C. Dickson, United States Army, performed the general duties relating to organization and personnel, while the operation of the shops was under the supervision of Mr. John J. Eason as assistant superintendent. On January 26, 1914, Mr. D. C. Nutting, United States Navy, reporting for duty, was assigned as superintendent and took over all the duties performed by Col. Dickson in connection with this division.

The establishments under operation by the division consisted of the Balboa shops (including roundhouse and car shops), the Cristobal shops and dry dock, Paraiso shops, Cristobal roundhouse, the small hoisting establishments at Gatun, Empire, and Paraiso, and the car-inspecting establishments at Cristobal and Balboa.

The Cristobal shops and dry dock have been charged with all repairs to floating equipment; as this dock was the only one available when a dry dock was necessary, it was in practically continuous use throughout the year. For the purpose of docking the five submarines which are on duty on the Isthmus and for docking the Corozal the upper lock of the east flight at Gatun was used. The Paraiso shops were reestablished on October 22, 1913, to take care of repair work on the dredging equipment operating in Culebra Cut. The hostling of four engines operating in this vicinity was turned over to these shops on May 25, 1914, and is performed under the foreman machinist. The Cristobal roundhouse was turned over to the mechanical division on April 1, 1914, and all hostling at the north end of the canal was concentrated there. The establishment, in addition to the roundhouse, comprises a small boiler plant and two air compressors with a combined capacity of about 2,000 feet per minute. The plant supplies air for hostling purposes and also for work on the new piers of the Panama Railroad. A small hostling plant was established at Empire, in the shops vacated, March 1. With the establishment of the electrical division on April 1, 1914, the electrical plants at Empire, Miraflores, Gatun, and Balboa, previously operated by the mechanical division, were turned over to that division and, as these plants contained air compressors, the air compressors were likewise turned over to the electrical division. The old shipways shops at the Pacific entrance, formerly occupied by the dredging division, were turned over to the mechanical division on October 22, 1913, and so continued until they were torn down in March and April. The machine shops and engine house at Gatun were operated for work in connection with the installation of lock ma

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MECHANICAL DIVISION,

chinery and caring for locomotives engaged in that vicinity. They e mechanical division was in charge of Mr. A. L. Robir

were abandoned April 1, 1914, and the work transferred to Balboa and

Cristobal. The Pedro Miguel engine house was abandoned on SepJuly 19, 1913, when he resigned from the service. Subsequr

tember 15, 1913, and the greater portion of the equipment moved at date and until March 6, 1914, Lieut. Col. T. C. Dicks

to the Gold Hill engine house and the buildings turned over to the ed States Army, performed the general duties relating to

quartermaster's department and torn down. An engine house was ation and personnel, while the operation of the shops

established at Gold Hill in September, 1913, to care for the equip? the supervision of Mr. John J. Eason as assistant super

ment employed in dry excavation north of Gold Hill. The engine nt. On January 26, 1914, Mr. D. C. Nutting, United St

house continued in operation until completion of the excavation work reporting for duty, was assigned as superintendent and ta

and was discontinued on March 31, 1914. The air-compressor plant ill the duties performed by Col. Dickson in connection

at Rio Grande, which had been in operation since 1905, was shut down ivision.

on October 15, 1913, and such compressed air as was required in the establishments under operation by the division consisted

district previously supplied by Rio Grande was furnished by the alboa shops (including roundhouse and car shops), the la

plant at Empire. The Cristobal car shops were in operation until hops and dry dock, Paraiso shops, Cristobal roundhouse,

March 7, 1914, when they were abandoned and all car work conhoisting establishments at Gatun, Empire, and Paraiso, es

centrated at the Balboa shops. When the Balboa roundhouse was -inspecting establishments at Cristobal and Balboa.

put into service on April 1, 1914, the Panama roundhouse of the Cristobal shops and dry dock have been charged with

Panama Railroad was placed out of use. to floating equipment; as this dock was the only one 32

Throughout the year, while the shops were in operation, two shifts nen a dry dock was necessary, it was in practically continent

Were regularly worked at Gorgona, Empire, Paraiso, and Balboa. bughout the year. For the purpose of docking the fire so

In addition to the double shift, emergencies continually arose which which are on duty on the Isthmus and for docking

necessitated large amounts of overtime work, in order that equipthe upper lock of the east flight at Gatun was used. I

ment might be kept in condition for use and to prevent delay in the shops were reestablished on October 22, 1913, to take cry

work of other divisions. ir work on the dredging equipment operating in Culete

For further details, as well as a statement showing the amount of he hostling of four engines operating in this vicinity

work done during the year by the various shops, attention is invited ver to these shops on May 25, 1914, and is performed ung

to Appendix D. man machinist. The Cristobal roundhouse was turned of echanical division on April 1, 1914, and all hostling at

DIVISION OF TERMINALS. d of the canal was concentrated there. The establishme

The division of terminal construction was organized on April 1, ion to the roundhouse, comprises a small boiler plante

1914, under Mr. H. H. Rousseau, United States Navy, as engineer of compressors with a combined capacity of about 2,000 €

terminal construction. The division embraces the forces of the te. The plant supplies air for hostling purposes and

former second division, chief engineer's office engaged in the design, on the new piers of the Panama Railroad. A small hostit

inspection and construction of the dry docks, shops, coal and fuels established at Empire, in the shops vacated, March establishment of the electrical division on April 1, 198

oil plants, floating cranes, docks and other terminal facilities; con

struction transportation by rail; the road, street and sewer work Fical plants at Empire, Miraflores, Gatun, and Balbos

,

under the landscape architect; and the breakwater construction at perated by the mechanical division, were turned over ion and, as these plants contained air compressors,

Dry docks.--The general description and principal dimensions of Drs were likewise turned over to the electrical dirisi

Dry Docks No. 1 and No. 2, at Balboa, were given in the previous Shipways shops at the Pacific entrance, formerly occupe

annual report. On account of the condition of funds, it was decided edging division, were turned over to the mechanical die

to defer the construction of Dry Dock No. 2, but such of the dock ctober 22, 1913, and so continued until they were torme dor and April. The machine shops and engine house at Gam

structure as serves as an entrance pier for Dry Dock No. 1, and as

will permit the future completion of Dry Dock No. 2 in the dry ated for work in connection with the installation of locks

without especial increase in cost will be built now. The cofferdam,

the Atlantic terminal.

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which was begun on April 1, 1913, to protect the entrance of Dry Dock No. 1, Dry Dock No. 2, the entrance basin, and coal-pocket excavations, was completed by placing 103,116 cubic yards of material. Difficulty was experienced through a portion of the double-track trestle giving way and moving outward after dumping from it had commenced, but this was overcome by reinforcing the outer toe by dumping material from barges and the cofferdam was completed. The leakage through it is relatively small and can be controlled by pumps. In excavating for Dry Dock No. 1 and Dry Dock No. 2, the coal pockets and entrance basin, the old Balboa machine shops forced the work to be confined to the center and south sides until November, when they were demolished and the last obstacle to excavation was removed. The total amount taken out from the site of Dry Dock No. 1 during the year was 358,282 cubic yards, 48,838 cubic yards of which were classified as earth and the balance as rock, making a total of 466,975 cubic yards excavated from this area up to the close of the year. The division cost for the year was $1.0250 per cubic yard, and the average division cost of the total was $0.9946 per cubic yard. From the site of Dry Dock No. 2, which is located just north of the entrance of Dry Dock No. 1, there were removed during the year 41,548 cubic yards of earth and 52,129 cubic yards of rock, at an average division cost of $0.8129 per cubic yard. Steam-shovel operations deepened the excavation from – 13.5 to the final grade for the entire area of the approach basin inside of the cofferdam, and a total of 351,333 cubic yards were removed at a division cost of $1.0250 per cubic yard. The area required for the storage of coal and for the travel of unloading towers measures 800 feet in length and about 400 feet in width, measured from the outer edge of the quay wall. The total amount of excavation during the year was 166,104 cubic yards, 79,837 cubic yards of which were earth and the balance rock. The average division cost was $0.7984 per cubic yard. The material excavated from the site of the dry docks, entrance basin, and coal pocket was removed by means of steam shovels, three of which were worked 8 hours a day until February, 1914, when on the 5th of that month the shovels were placed on a 12-hour basis and another shovel added. These shovels worked on split shifts, 12 hours a day, continuously to the end of the year; one shovel was removed in June. The contract entered into October 12, 1912, for one pair of steel miter-gate leaves and fixed irons was completed during the fiscal year, and the material is stored on the Isthmus awaiting erection. The moving machines for operating the leaves, together with motors, controls, and covers, are also delivered.

Balboa coaling station.—Upon completion of the excavation for the coaling plant, work was begun on masonry for the crane runway supports, which extend east and west through the center of the

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