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PROCLAMATION by the President of the United States,

warning Persons against enteriny Behring Sea for the purpose of killing Fur-beariny Animals (Seal Fishery).Washington, April 1, 1891.

The following provisions of the laws of the United States are hereby published for the information of all concerned.

Section 1956, Revised Statutes, Chapter 3, Title 23, enacts that:--

See Vol. LXXXI, page 1273.] Section 3 of the Act entitled “An Act to provide for the protection of the Salmon Fisheries of Alaska," approved the 2nd March, 1889, provides that:-

[See Vol. LXXXI, page 237.] Now, therefore, I, Benjamin Harrison, President of the United States, pursuant to the above recited Statutes, hereby warn all persons against entering the waters of Behring Sea within the dominion of the United States, for the purpose of violating the provisions of said section 1956, Revised Statutes; and I hereby proclaim that all persons found to be, or to have been, engaged in any violation of the laws of the United States, in said waters, will be arrested and punished as above provided, and that all vessels so employed, their tackle, apparel, furniture, and cargoes, will be seized and forfeited.

In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be asli sed.

Done at the city of Washington, this 4th day of April, 1891, and of the Independence of the United States the 115th.

(L.S.) BENJ. HARRISON. By the President: JAMES G. BLAINE, Secretary of State.

PROCLAMATION by the President of the United States,

applying the Copyright Act of March 3, 1891,* to Great Britain, Belgium, France, and Switzerland.-II'ushington, July 1, 1891.

WHEREAS it is provided by section 13 of the Act of Congress of the 3rd March, 1891, entitled “An Act to amend Title 60,

* Page 97.

Chapter 3, of the Revised Statutes of the United States, relating to Copyrights,” that said Act "shall only apply to a citizen or subject of a foreign State or nation when such foreign State or nation perniits to citizens of the United States of America the benefit of copyright on substantially the same basis as its own citizens; or when such foreign State or nation is a party to an International Agreement which provides for reciprocity in the granting of copyright, by the terms of which Agreement the United States of America may, at its pleasure, become a party to such Agreement:"

And whereas it is also provided by said section that "the existence of either of the conditions aforesaid shall be determined by the President of the United States by Proclamation made from time to time as the purposes of this Act may require:”

And whereas satisfactory official assurances have been given that in Belgium, France, Great Britain and the British possessions, and Switzerland, the law permits to citizens of the United States the benefit of copyright on substantially the same basis as to the citizens of those countries :

Now, therefore, I, Benjamin Harrison, President of the United Siates of America, do declare and proclaim that the first of the conditions specified in section 13 of the Act of the 3rd March, 1891, is now fulfilled in respect to the citizens or subjects of Belgium, France, Great Britain, and Switzerland.

In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be asfixed.

Done at the city of Washington, this 1st day of July, 1891, and of the Independence of the United States the 115th.

(L.S.) BENJ. TARRISON. By the President: WILLIAM F. WILARTON, Actiny Secretary of State.

PROCLAMATION by the President of the United States,

respecting a Reciprocal Commercial Arrangement between the United States and the Spanish Islands of Cubu and Porto Rico.-Washington, July 31, 1891.

Whereas, pursuant to section 3 of the Act of Congress approved the 1st October, 1890, entitled “In Act to reduce the revenue and qualize duties on imports, and for other purposes," the Secretary of State of the United States of America communicated to the Government of Spain the action of the ('ongress of the 1990-91. LXIXIT.]

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United States of America, with a view to secure reciprocal trade, in declaring the articles enumerated in said section 3, to wit, sugars, molasses, coffee, and hides, to be exempt from duty upon their importation into the United States of America :

And whereas the Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary of Spain at Washington has communicated to the Secretary of State the fact that, in reciprocity and compensation for the admission into the United States of America free of all duty of the articles enumerated in section 3 of said Act, the Government of Spain will, by due legal enactment, and as a provisional measure, admit, from and after the 1st September, 1891, into all the established ports of entry of the Spanish islands of Cuba and Porto Rico, the articles or merchandize named in the following Transitory Schedule, on the terms stated therein, provided that the same be the product or manufacture of the United States and proceed directly from the ports of said States :

TRANSITORY SCHEDULE.

Products or Manufactures of the United States to be admitted into Cuba and

Porto Rico free of Duties. 1. Meats, in brine, salted or smoked, bacon, hams, and meats preserved in cans, in lard, or by extraction of air ; jerked beef excepted.

2. Lard.
3. Tallow and other animal greases, melted or crude, unmanufactured.

4. Fish and shellfish, live, fresh, dried, in brine, smoked, pickled; oysters and salmon in cans.

5. Oats, barley, rye, and buckwheat, and flour of these cereals.

6. Starch, maizena, and other alimentary products of corn, except cornmeal.

7. Cotton seed, oil, and meal-cake of said seed for cattle.
8. Hay, straw for forage, and bran.
9. Fruits, fresh, dried, and preserved, except raisins.
10. Vegetables and garden products, fresh and dried.
11. Resin of pine, tar, pitch, and turpentine.

12. Woods of all kinds, in trunks or logs, joists, rafters, planks, beams, boards, round or cylindric masts, although cut, planerd and tongued and grooved, including flooring

13. Woods for cooperage, including staves, headings, and wooden hoops. 16. Wooden boxes, mounted or unmounted, except of cedar.

15. Woods, ordinary, manufactured into doors, frames, window 3, and shutters, without paint or varnish, and wooden houses, unmounted, without paint or varnish.

16. Waggons and carts for ordinary roads and agriculture. 17. Sewing machines.

18. Petroleum, raw or unrefined, according to the classification fixed in Die existing orders for the importation of this article in said islands.

19. Coal, mineral. 20. Ice.

Products or Manufactures of the United States to be admitted into Cuba and

Porto Rico on payment of the Duties stated. 21. Corn or maize, 25 cents per 100 kilog. 22. Corn meal, 25 cents per 100 kilog. 23. Wheat, from 18t January, 1892, 30 cents per 100 kilog. 24. Wheat-flour, from !st January, 1892, 1 dollar per 100 kilog.

Products or Manufactures of the United States to be admitted into Cuba and

Porto Rico at a reluction of Duty of 25 per cent. 25. Butter and cheese. 26. Petroleum, refined. 27. Boots and shoes, in whole or in part, of leather or skins.

And whereas the Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiairy of Spain in Washington has further communicated to the Secretary of State that the Government of Spain will, in like manner and as a definitive arrangement, admit, from and after the 1st July, 1892, into all the established ports of entry of the Spanish islands of Cuba and Porto Rico, the articles or merchandize named in the following Schedules (A), (B), (C), and (D), on the terms stated therein, provided that the same be the product or manufacture of the United States and proceed directly from the ports of said States.

SCHEDULE (A). Products or Manufactures of the United States to be admitted into Cuba and

Porto Rico free of Duties. 1. Varble, jasper, and alabaster, natural or artificial, in rough or in pieces, drnased, squared, and prepared for taking shape.

2. Other stones and earthy matters, including cement, employed in building, the arts, and industries.

3. Waters, mineral or medicinal.
4. Ice.
5. Coal, mineral.
6. Resin, tar, pitch, turpentine, asphalt, schist, and bitumen.

7. Petroleum, raw or crude, in accordance with the classification fixed in the Tariff of said islands.

8. Clay, ordinary, in paving tiles, large and small, bricks, and roof tiles, unglazed, for the construction of buildings, ovens, and other similar purposes.

9. Gold and silver coin.
10. Iron, cast in pigs, and old iron and steel.

11. Iron, cast, in pipes, beams, rafters, and similar articles, for the construction of buildings, and in ordinary manufactures (see repertory).

12. Iron, wrought, and steel, in bars, rails and bars of all kinds, plates, heams, rafters, and other similar articles for construction of buildings.

13. Iron, wrought, and steel, in wirc, nails, screws, nuts, and pipes.

14. Iron, wrought, and steel, in ordinary manufactures, and wire cloth unmanufactured (see repertory).

15. Cotton, raw, with or without seed. 16. Cotton seed, oil and meal-cake of same for cattle. 17. Tallow and all other animal greases, melted or crude, unmanufactured. 18. Books and pamphlets, printed, bound and unbound.

19. Woods of all kinds, in trunks or logs, joists, rafters, planks, beams, boards, and round or cylindric masts, although cut, planed, tongned, and groored, including flooring.

20. Wooden cooperage, including staves, headings, and wooden hoops. 21. Wooden boxes, mounted or unmounted, except of cedar.

22. Woods, ordinary, manufactured into doors, frames, windows, and shutters, without paint or varnish, and wooden houses, unmounted, without paint or varnish.

23. Woods, ordinary, manufactured into all kinds of articles turned or unturned, painted or varnished, except furniture (see repertory).

24. Manures, natural or artificial.

25. Implements, utensils, and tools for agriculture, the arts, and mechanical tracles.

26. Machines and apparatus, agricultural, motive, industrial, and scientific, of all classes and materials, and loose pieces for the same, including waggons, carts, and hand-carts for ordinary roads and agriculture.

27. Material and articles for public works, such as railroads, tramways, roadls, canals for irrigation and navigation, use of waters, ports, lighthouses, and civil construction of general utility, when introduced by authorization of the Gorernment, or if free admission is obtained in accordance with local laws.

28. Materials of all classes for the construction, repair in whole or in part, of vessels, subject to specific regulations to avoid abuse in the importation.

29. Meats, in brine, salted and smoked, including bacon, bams, and meats preserved in cans, in laril, or hy extraction of air ; jerked beef excepted.

30. Lari and butter. 31. Cheese.

32. Fish and shell-fish, live, fresli, driel, in brine, salted, smoked, and pickled ; oysters and salmon in cans.

33. Oats, barley, rye, and buckwheat, and flour of these cercals.

34. Starch, maizena, and other alimentary products of corn, except commeal.

35. Fruits, fresli, dried, and preserved, except raisins.
36. Vegetables and garden products, fresh and cried.
37. Hay, straw for forage, and bran.
38. Trees, plants, shrubs, and garden seeds.
39. Tan bark.

SCHEDULE (B). Products or Manufactures of the United States to be admitted into Cuba and

Porto Rico on payment of the Duties stated. 10. Corn or maize, 25 cents per 100 kilog, 11. Corn-meal, 25 cents per 100 kilog. 42. Wlicat, 30 cents per 100 kilog. 13. Wheat-flour, 1 dollar per 100 kilog.

14. Carriages, cars, and other vehicles for railroads or tramways, where suthorization of the Government for free admission has not been obtained, 1 per cent. ad ralorem,

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